By Tim Graham | October 22, 2015 | 11:50 PM EDT

They were feeling Hillary Clinton's pain on Thursday's Morning Edition before the House special committee on Benghazi heard her testimony. Congressional correspondent Tamara Keith claimed Hillary's "what difference does it make" comment -- highly praised by the media at the time -- has been taken out of context by Clinton critics.

Back in 2013, NPR said Hillary suffered "not a scratch" and was now "fireproof" after Republicans tried to tangle with her in that previous Benghazi hearing.

By Tim Graham | October 6, 2015 | 10:54 AM EDT

As the Supreme Court term begins, NPR court correspondent Nina Totenberg played dumb on Monday’s Morning Edition, much like Adam Liptak at The New York Times. Why would conservatives dislike “consistently conservative” chief justice John Roberts?

Desperately employing rickety rationales twice to uphold Obamacare somehow doesn’t undermine “consistency.” Totenberg forgot Roberts being hailed by Time magazine in 2012 as similar to  Beethoven, Willie Mays, and King Solomon: “Not since King Solomon offered to split the baby has a judge engineered a slicker solution to a bitterly divisive dispute.”

By Tim Graham | September 27, 2015 | 7:21 AM EDT

On Saturday, NPR’s Weekend Edition celebrated atheist author Philip Pullman and the His Dark Materials trilogy he wrote for middle-schoolers, a sort of anti-Narnia series. Anchor Scott Simon celebrated the 20th anniversary of the first book in this trilogy and interviewed Pullman as he sat a BBC studio in Oxford, hinting they have "maybe the mark of real excellence."

By Tim Graham | August 23, 2015 | 7:52 AM EDT

The police-bashing community organizers known as the “Black Lives Matter” movement have a healthy contingent of completely biased black journalist/publicists. Gene Demby, brought into National Public Radio to agitate in the racial “Code Switch” project, wrote a 3,900-word essay for the NPR website and appeared on Friday’s Morning Edition to discuss how depressing it is to travel from cop victim to cop victim.

Anchor Steve Inskeep set Demby up to explain the toll of "How Black Reporters Report On Black Death" and why objectivity was a dishonest white construct on this taxpayer-funded network:

By Tim Graham | August 13, 2015 | 2:11 PM EDT

NPR Morning Edition anchor interviewed President Obama about just two topics: the Iran deal and race relations. On Wednesday’s morning show, Inskeep began with a question from the radical left – from black professor and MSNBC host Michael Eric Dyson – and then just prompted the president instead of really asking questions. 

Dyson wrote a column for The New York Times going after the usual allegedly racist suspects: “The right wing had made furious efforts to demonize him as a man unworthy of assuming the mantle of national leadership. The assaults from political figures who portrayed him as a cipher, or a monkey or, later, the police officers who cracked jokes at his expense, proved the toxic atmosphere.” That’s not the section Inskeep quoted. 

By Tim Graham | August 12, 2015 | 10:07 PM EDT

NPR Morning Edition anchor Steve Inskeep was granted another interview with President Obama just before he left on another Martha’s Vineyard vacation, and the first story aired on Tuesday's Morning Edition, with a second on Tuesday night’s All Things Considered. The subject was limited to the Iran deal.

Despite the strange notion held by many liberals that NPR is a voice for civility in media and politics, Inskeep failed to ask the president about his controversial recent remarks in a speech at American University that “It’s those hardliners chanting ‘Death to America’ who have been most opposed to the deal. They're making common cause with the Republican Caucus.”

By Jeffrey Meyer | July 8, 2015 | 3:42 PM EDT

During Hillary Clinton’s first national interview on CNN Tuesday, the Democratic presidential candidate was pressed about her use of a private e-mail server during her time as Secretary of State, but both PBS and NPR ignored the topic during their post-interview coverage on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning.

By Tom Blumer | June 24, 2015 | 10:56 PM EDT

The politically correct speech police are everywhere these days. Many members of the leftist establishment have taken it upon themselves to aid in their enforcement efforts. No one is safe — not even the person they want us to believe is destined to be the Democrats' 2016 presidential nominee.

Yesterday, at a Florissant, Missouri church only five miles from Ferguson, Hillary Clinton uttered the following words in succession: "All lives matter." NPR's Tamara Keith and Amita Kelly devoted much of their four-minute "Morning Edition" report on her appearance to what was described as a "3-Word Misstep."

By Matthew Balan | June 12, 2015 | 9:45 PM EDT

Friday's Morning Edition on NPR spotlighted the author of children's books who asserted that the push for the legalization of same-sex "marriage" is "the same struggle" as the fight against bans on interracial marriage during the 1960s. Karen Grigsby Bates marked the anniversary of the 1967 Loving v. Virginia case, which struck down anti-miscegenation laws in the United States, by featuring writer/artist Selina Alko, who stated that "while the Loving case is long settled, it's still deeply relevant in the current fight for marriage equality."

By Matthew Balan | June 5, 2015 | 6:21 PM EDT

NPR's Morning Edition on Friday actually covered the EPA's new report that found that fracking for oil and natural gas "has not caused widespread pollution in drinking water," as host Renee Montagne put it. The liberal public radio network's report came as ABC and NBC maintained their blackout on the study on their morning and evening newscasts.

By Matthew Balan | May 29, 2015 | 5:42 PM EDT

Friday's Morning Edition on NPR did its best to try to promote the liberal cause of expanding Medicaid in Texas. Wade Goodwyn lined up six soundbites from pro-expansion talking heads, versus only two from former Texas Governor Rick Perry, an opponent. Goodwyn played up that "in hating the Affordable Care Act, the state is leaving on the table as much as a hundred billion dollars of federal money over ten years – money that would pay for health insurance for more than a million of its working poor."

By Tim Graham | April 27, 2015 | 9:58 AM EDT

Former White House press secretary Dana Perino appeared on The Kelly File on Friday night to lament that she shared a touching story about President Bush visiting wounded soldiers in Washington with National Public Radio, but they edited out a family who was overjoyed to see the president, choosing to focus just on an angry mother who was mad at Bush. "Why are your children okay, but my son is here?"