This category contains postings about the largest newspapers in America. For other papers, look under "Regional News" for each state.

By Tom Blumer | March 23, 2017 | 7:45 PM EDT

In their March 12 coverage of the release from prison of a Jordanian man who killed seven Israeli schoolgirls 20 years ago, Washington Post reporters Ruth Eglash and Taylor Luck quoted one of the many Jordanians who consider the man a hero claiming that “Israelis kill Palestinians by the hundreds every month, and no one is brought to justice." The pair allowed that claim to go unchallenged, leaving one to wonder where this "great journalism" the paper promotes in its subscription solicitations is hiding.

By Tom Blumer | March 22, 2017 | 6:25 PM EDT

One would hope that the Washington Post, where the news masthead is "Democracy Dies in Darkness," and whose emails soliciting subscriptions tell recipients that "Democracy needs great journalism," searched far and wide for the most credible person they could possibly find to criticize the foreign-policy impact of how the Trump administration "twists the truth." Apparently, the best person they could find for the job was ... Susan Rice?

By Tom Blumer | March 22, 2017 | 1:00 AM EDT

Early Tuesday evening, Curtis Houck at NewsBusters noted that the rape of a 14 year-old girl at a Maryland high school by two older teens (17 and 18) who recently arrived the U.S. was the subject of a question at Trump Press Secretary Sean Spicer's press conference earlier that day. The Washington Post's first story on the rape Friday illustrates Houck's observation that the crime is "an inconvenient story for their liberal narrative" that one must downplay or simply not report negative news about the actions of illegal immigrants.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | March 21, 2017 | 12:44 AM EDT

Following the release of President Donald Trump’s new federal budget last week, the liberal media was up in arms that Trump would dare to defund the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. On Sunday, a CNN anchor asked the MRC’s Dan Gainor if it was “conservative revenge.” But The Washington Post on Monday had an even more ridiculous explanation. “Trump wants to defund PBS. ‘Sesame Street’ brutally parodied him for decades,” read the headline to an arts and entertainment article by Avi Selk. 

By Tom Blumer | March 20, 2017 | 8:15 AM EDT

On Saturday, Harvard law professor, lifelong Democrat and dogged Bill Clinton defender during the late-1990s Monica Lewinsky saga Alan Dershowitz was interviewed on Fox & Friends about U.S. Court rulings in Hawaii and Maryland halting enforcement of the Trump administration's revised temporary travel ban against six countries. Dershowitz, who strongly disagrees with the judges' rulings, made a point which the press has almost uniformly failed to note, and which echoes something I am told the State of Hawaii's Attorney General openly admitted during his court arguments, namely that if former President Barack Obama had issued the exact same order during his administration, it would have been upheld, or even litigated. But because it was Donald Trump's order, it was halted.

By Tom Blumer | March 19, 2017 | 1:31 PM EDT

If a federal judge allowed a lawsuit to proceed alleging that police led participants in a far-left protest rally into a gauntlet of violence-prone right-wing counter-demonstrators, and that several protesters were pummeled and hurt as a result, it would be nationally prominent news. But the national establishment press, and the California press outside of the San Francisco Bay area, have just demonstrated that when the political affiliations of those involved are different, it's not news, even when the aggrieved protesters win a significant court victory affirming their depiction of events.

By Tom Blumer | March 17, 2017 | 11:31 AM EDT

A Wonkblog item at the Washington Post about immigrants who have been receiving food stamps allegedly deciding to cancel their enrollment has been sharply criticized for a headline change which occurred a short time after the entry went up. It was: "Immigrants are now canceling their food stamps for fear that Trump will deport them"; now it's "Immigrants are going hungry so Trump won't deport them." Despite the headline revision's alarmism, that's nowhere near the most serious problem with Caitlin Dewey's post.

By Tom Blumer | March 16, 2017 | 8:15 PM EDT

On Tuesday, Tucker Carlson opened his Fox News show by reviewing the "evidence," after months of allegations and bitter left-leaning cable news hysteria, that Russia conspired, perhaps with now-President Donald Trump's help, to engineer the Republican's November presidential win — by, in short, asserting that "there's no reason to believe that Russia changed the course of American political history." Then, after savagely indicting NBC News for its obvious attempt to tip the scales in Hillary Clinton's favor by releasing the Access Hollywood Trump tape to the Washington Post two days before the second presidential debate, Carlson asked a far more important question: "What do you think played a bigger role in the 2016 race: The Access Hollywood tape or the Russian government." Answer: "That's an obvious one."

By Tom Blumer | March 15, 2017 | 4:58 PM EDT

The Washington Post, which recently changed its web masthead's motto to "Democracy Dies in Darkness," also promises potential subscribers "Award-winning content" and "Top political coverage." We've yet to hear from the Post where it would categorize its original description Sunday of destruction perpetrated by far-left environmentalist vandals — as "a daring act of defiance" — at Trump National Golf Club in California.

By Tom Blumer | March 14, 2017 | 4:17 PM EDT

The outcome of the Michael Brown saga in Ferguson, Missouri, which began in August 2014, reached a climax in November 2014 when a grand jury did not indict police officer Darren Wilson, and ended with a whimper in March 2015 when the Justice Department saw no basis for bringing civil rights charges, infuriated the left. So it seemed inevitable that a conspiracy theory would emerge attempting to rehabilitate Brown's reputation while planting doubt about the circumstances leading to his death — and one just has.

By Tom Blumer | March 13, 2017 | 4:20 PM EDT

Demonstrating that the left will risk the reputation and credibility of virtually any of its cherished institutions in the name of defending the biased establishment press against its center-right competitors, the Harvard Library has published "Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda," a "research Guide" purporting to offer "a brief introduction to the spread of misinformation of all kinds and tools for identifying it." 

By Tom Blumer | March 12, 2017 | 5:46 PM EDT

An irony-ignorant skit on the March 11 edition of Saturday Night Live featured a parody commercial portraying Ivanka Trump promoting a perfume called "Complicit." Washington Post writer Aaron Blake covered the episode in an alleged "Analysis" blog post, yet managed to ignore the February success of Ivanka's product line despite a declared leftist boycott and Nordstrom dropping her brand.