By Tom Blumer | November 22, 2016 | 6:42 PM EST

At a Sunday press briefing in Lima, Peru, President Barack Obama concluded his response to a question referring to how President-Elect Trump might consider handling his extensive holdings during his presidency by saying that "I am extremely proud of the fact that over eight years we have not had the kinds of scandals that have plagued other administrations."

By Tom Blumer | November 21, 2016 | 3:49 PM EST

Though there are other candidates for the post, it appears that the two leading contenders to take the disgraced Donna Brazile's place as the head of the Democratic National Committee are Minnesota Congressman Keith Ellison and former 2004 presidential candidate Howard Dean.

It appears that one of the requirements to be DNC head is being on the record as equating Republican and conservative politicians and officials to Hitler or his party. Ellison did so to George W. Bush when he was president by treating the 9/11 terrorist attacks in the U.S. and the 1930s Reichstag fire in Germany as equivalent events. Dean was more blunt on Sunday, applying the "Nazi" tag repeatedly and remorselessly to Steve Bannon, President-Elect Donald Trump's recently selected chief strategist and senior counselor.

By Tom Blumer | November 19, 2016 | 7:57 PM EST

The establishment press wants readers, listeners and viewers to believe that the search engines and social media are being overwhelmed by "fake news." Those making such allegations are, with rare exceptions, thinking of conservative and center-right web sites which have been countering their established wisdom and taking readers and dollars away from them.

Well, if that's so, at least in regards to Google and Donald Trump's nomination of Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions as Attorney General, I'm having a hard time finding evidence of that. Instead, auto-suggested search results provided by the world's dominant search engine on Saturday took me straight to the leftist fever swamps and to a New York Times editorial which might as well have originated there.

By Tom Blumer | November 17, 2016 | 7:33 PM EST

The weekend before Election Day, Jake Tapper at CNN, interviewing Democratic Minnesota Senator Al Franken, used the classic "some people say" tactic to allege that there were anti-Semitic undertones in the Donald Trump campaign's closing ad. Why? Because three of the many people briefly pictured in the ad, in which the candidate criticized the political establishment's attitudes and actions which he believes have hurt everyday Americans, happen to be Jewish.

So you might expect that Tapper, CNN, and for that matter the rest of the establishment press would be extensively investigating and reporting on the years of anti-Semitic activities and remarks of Democrat Keith Ellison, especially now that the Minnesota congressman is in the running to be the next director of the Democratic National Committee. Nope.

By Matt Philbin | November 1, 2016 | 11:14 AM EDT

What do you suppose happens on YouTube to a video that is a “discourse on the First Amendment and the tactics that progressives are using to limit speech and political engagement by conservatives”? Well, according to the Wall Street Journal, it falls victim to an algorithm with absolutely no sense of irony.

By Tom Blumer | September 8, 2016 | 5:39 PM EDT

"Firsts" — first man on the moon, first black president, first state to legalize something which was previously a crime, etc. — are supposed to be a big deal, right?

Tuesday evening, the Houston Chronicle reported a first in the entire history of organized labor in the U.S., and the national press is ignoring it. That's likely because it's really bad news for Big Labor. The jury verdict in a lawsuit filed by PJS Janitorial Services against the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) represents "the first time that a jury has found against a union in a business defamation or disparagement case."

By Tom Blumer | August 30, 2016 | 11:18 PM EDT

Those who continue to bitterly cling to the notion that the press is fair and balanced won't be able to explain this one away.

In covering Colin Kaepernick's Sunday comments about his decision to sit through the National Anthem just before the beginning of National Football League games, the San Francisco 49ers quarterback called GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump "openly racist." He immediately followed by stating that "any other person" would "be in prison" for having "done (the) things illegally" that Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton has done. The press has frequently mentioned what Kaepernick said about Trump, but has almost completely ignored what he said about Mrs. Clinton.

By Kristine Marsh | May 20, 2016 | 11:14 AM EDT

Add “Marxist extremist” “Islamic radical” and “murderer sympathizer” to the list of controversial people Google finds worthy of celebrating. The major tech company and search engine decided to use yesterday’s “doodle” to honor Yuri Kochiyama, a Japanese-American radical who converted to Islam and considered terrorists and cop-killers her heroes. Google’s post solidifies the company’s stance of promoting radical leftist icons and ideas while scorning mainstream and traditional American heroes and holidays.

By Randy Hall | April 29, 2016 | 5:03 PM EDT

Despite the fact that Google -- a multinational technology company that specializes in Internet-related services and products -- has announced it will serve as the official livestream provider during this year's Republican convention, liberal groups and civil rights advocates have called on the technology giant to sever any connection to the event, which will be held July 18-21 in Cleveland, Ohio.

According to an article by Tony Romm, senior technology reporter for the Politico website, the company's “mere presence at the GOP convention is sure to spark new opposition from liberal groups and civil rights advocates” due to Republican front-runner “Donald Trump's incendiary rhetoric.”

By Tom Blumer | March 27, 2016 | 6:32 PM EDT

Three years ago, Mark Finkelstein at NewsBusters noted how Google was subject to a torrent of criticism for devoting its March 31 special-occasion redesign of its logo, otherwise known as a "doodle," to the 86th anniversary of farm workers' leader Cesar Chavez's birthday. March 31 was also Easter Sunday that year.

Finkelstein noted that even hardened MSNBC liberal Mika Brzezinski sided with critics, saying, "how about a statement one day that just says: 'we screwed up'?" Chavez himself, who was a devout Catholic, would likely have been just as offended as anyone at Google's choice. Well, it turns out that the Chavez controversy only hinted at what MSNBC's Joe Scarborough called the company's "cultural blind spot" relating to Easter.

By Tom Blumer | March 26, 2016 | 10:53 AM EDT

As noted in my previous post, the press is determined that the world not learn of profound statements made by world leaders it despises. The specific reference was to Israeli Prime Mininster Benjamin Netanyahu's five-word admonishment to those who believe that some accommodation can be reached with Islamic terrorists: "Terrorists Have No Resolvable Grievances."

Meanwhile, the press protects those it likes when they make breathtakingly ignorant remarks. Such remarks occur with alarming regularity any time U.S. President Barack Obama speaks without the aid of a teleprompter. In Argentina on Wednesday, during a question-answer exchange with a youth group, Obama said that debates over the superiority of capitalism compared to communism "are interesting intellectual arguments," but that "for your generation, you should be practical and just choose from what works." Press coverage of Obama's remarks has been sparse.

By Tom Blumer | March 24, 2016 | 1:34 PM EDT

On Wednesday, at a joint press conference with Argentine President Mauricio Macri in Buenos Aires, President Obama told the world that it can defeat the Islamic State "in part by saying, you are not strong; you are weak."

Fortunately for him and unfortunately for those who wish to be fully informed, the establishment press is almost always there to save Obama from himself. Google News searches indicate that fewer than 3 percent of outlets felt that Obama's naive belief that telling IS that "you are not strong" is part of a genuine strategy to defeat the group should be relayed to their audiences.