By Tom Blumer | March 27, 2016 | 6:32 PM EDT

Three years ago, Mark Finkelstein at NewsBusters noted how Google was subject to a torrent of criticism for devoting its March 31 special-occasion redesign of its logo, otherwise known as a "doodle," to the 86th anniversary of farm workers' leader Cesar Chavez's birthday. March 31 was also Easter Sunday that year.

Finkelstein noted that even hardened MSNBC liberal Mika Brzezinski sided with critics, saying, "how about a statement one day that just says: 'we screwed up'?" Chavez himself, who was a devout Catholic, would likely have been just as offended as anyone at Google's choice. Well, it turns out that the Chavez controversy only hinted at what MSNBC's Joe Scarborough called the company's "cultural blind spot" relating to Easter.

By Tom Blumer | March 26, 2016 | 10:53 AM EDT

As noted in my previous post, the press is determined that the world not learn of profound statements made by world leaders it despises. The specific reference was to Israeli Prime Mininster Benjamin Netanyahu's five-word admonishment to those who believe that some accommodation can be reached with Islamic terrorists: "Terrorists Have No Resolvable Grievances."

Meanwhile, the press protects those it likes when they make breathtakingly ignorant remarks. Such remarks occur with alarming regularity any time U.S. President Barack Obama speaks without the aid of a teleprompter. In Argentina on Wednesday, during a question-answer exchange with a youth group, Obama said that debates over the superiority of capitalism compared to communism "are interesting intellectual arguments," but that "for your generation, you should be practical and just choose from what works." Press coverage of Obama's remarks has been sparse.

By Tom Blumer | March 24, 2016 | 1:34 PM EDT

On Wednesday, at a joint press conference with Argentine President Mauricio Macri in Buenos Aires, President Obama told the world that it can defeat the Islamic State "in part by saying, you are not strong; you are weak."

Fortunately for him and unfortunately for those who wish to be fully informed, the establishment press is almost always there to save Obama from himself. Google News searches indicate that fewer than 3 percent of outlets felt that Obama's naive belief that telling IS that "you are not strong" is part of a genuine strategy to defeat the group should be relayed to their audiences.

By Tom Blumer | February 29, 2016 | 12:00 AM EST

Two categories of news the press has studiously avoided during the Obama era came together this week, causing it to (in my view) proactively decide to ignore emotional congressional testimony which should have been front-page news almost everywhere.

The first is their virtually complete disinterest in reporting on congressional hearings. The list is longer than can be recounted here, but certainly includes Operation Fast & Furious, the IRS targeting scandal (now on Day 1,025) and implementation of Obamacare. The second is their reluctance to report any news casting the government's handling of legal and illegal immigration in a bad light. Leo Perrero's shocking testimony, which detailed the treatment of American IT workers at Disney who were replaced by lower-skilled foreign workers they were required to train, contained both elements. It was thus ripe to be ignored — and was.

By Tom Blumer | February 28, 2016 | 10:06 AM EST

532,000 people voted in the South Carolina Democratic Party presidential primary in 2008. In this year's primary, completed yesterday, only 370,000 did. In the meantime, the state's pool of eligible voters increased by about 8 percent.

Thus, turnout in this year's Democratic primary in the Palmetto State, down by just over 30 percent in absolute terms, was down by about 35 percent on a population-adjusted basis. Beyond grudging, routine and non-specific recognitions of the decline, that's barely news. Moreover, the fact that this result occurred in a state no Democratic Party candidate has won in 40 years and in a region Republicans have mostly swept during that time certainly can't be allowed to distract from Hillary Clinton's "sweeping victory."

By Tom Blumer | February 5, 2016 | 4:31 PM EST

Five items found at the Politico filed late Monday or early Tuesday reported that supporters of Bernie Sanders at the Iowa caucuses, while watching a live feed of Hillary Clinton's speech late Monday evening, began chanting "She's a liar!" The chants grew until they "took over the room," and didn't stop until Sanders campaign officials cut off the live feed being shown.

This is barely news in the rest of the establishment press, which has obsessed over the Ben Carson-Ted Cruz-CNN controversy, devoting an obviously inordinate amount of time to it and, as Cruz himself has shown, getting it wrong in the process.

By Tom Blumer | December 29, 2015 | 5:37 AM EST

Did you hear the story about the conservative city councilman who was so incensed at his private-citizen critics that he or she published their names and addresses and accused them of racism in the process?

Of course you didn't. If it happened, press coverage of "right-wing intimidation" would be everywhere. Instead, "doxing," the term given to such exposures, is a technique predominantly practiced by hardened leftists and even occasionally by their politicians, more often than not with little in the way of media or other repercussions. One such person who appears to be skating virtually scot-free is Minneapolis City Council member Alondra Cano.

By Tom Blumer | December 28, 2015 | 8:08 PM EST

According to NewsBusters' own Blonde Gator, Hillary Clinton has, in the 8-1/2 months since she declared her candidacy, committed 51 gaffes and goofs. That's an average rate of six per month. Imagine how many there would be if Mrs. Clinton genuinely campaigned among the people instead of among preselected groupies.

One of her latest gaffes, which occurred last week at an elementary school in Iowa, was a humdinger. Predictably, the establishment press almost completely ignored it, while a couple of journalists who noticed the center-right's reaction tried and failed to excuse it.

By Tom Blumer | December 25, 2015 | 11:58 PM EST

In a year-end interview with National Public Radio, President Barack Obama largely blamed "a saturation of news" coming from a media which "is pursuing ratings" for growing concerns in America over the ability of ISIS and other terrorists to conduct attacks on U.S. soil, and indicated that "it's up to the media to make a determination about how they want to cover things."

It's reasonable to believe that Obama was telling the press corps, which already works furiously to prop him up, that they need to cut back on their reporting of domestic terrorist activities, arrests and court proceedings. It seems fair to say that the Associated Press, aka the Administration's Press, quickly took that advice to heart in its selective coverage of the saga of Abdirizak Mohamed Warsame, and that its selectivity has kept a noteworthy story very quiet.

By Tom Blumer | December 24, 2015 | 10:57 AM EST

Merchants haven't been the only ones discouraging those who work for them from using the word "Christmas" during the Christmas shopping season. The press has been at it for years, and those efforts have brought regrettable results.

This is the eleventh year of an effort I began in 2005. Each year has involved three sets of Google News searches on "Christmas shopping season" and "holiday shopping season" (both terms in quotes) done a few days before Christmas, two weeks earlier, and four weeks earlier. In late November, after doing the first round, I reported that the percentage of "Christmas shopping season" mentions came in "at the lowest level in all of the years I have been tracking." Sadly, with all three rounds now completed, the raw percentage increased a bit from the first round, but the overall result hasn't changed.

By Tom Blumer | December 21, 2015 | 12:52 AM EST

A leftist flack who has been waging his own personal war on women for at least a decade has been exposed. As a result, his far-left public relations firm, a leader in the field, has closed.

FitzGibbon Media shut down on Thursday. That's because Trevor FitzGibbon, the firm's founder and owner, who also was "a communications director for (now-President Barack) Obama’s 2008 campaign," has been accused by several now-former employees of sexual assault and sexual harassment. Though the defunct firm's client list reads like a Who's Who of "progressive" and radical causes, and despite how sensational charges such as these are usually considered ready-made clickbait in the press, the FitzGibbon shutdown has received minimal press exposure. The obvious comparative point, raised at TruthRevolt on Friday: "Just imagine if this were a GOP PR firm."

By P.J. Gladnick | December 12, 2015 | 10:20 AM EST

On November 19, 2014 Google commemorated the 57th birthday of Ofra Haza with a Google Doodle. Who?

Also in 2014, Google Doodle honored the 151st birthday of Annie Jump Cannon. Who?

A few days after that, Wassily Kandinsky was similarly recognized with a Google Doodle on his 148th birthday. Who?

Well today is the 100th birthday of Frank Sinatra so obviously Google Doodle must honor Ol' Blue Eyes. If you thought that you would be wrong. Relative nonentities receive honors from Google but when it comes to a major cultural icon on his 100th birthday, they amazingly chose to ignore him.  Truly pathetic. To get an idea of how Frank Sinatra changed the world, let us read this column by David Lehman, author of Sinatra's Century: One Hundred Notes on the Man and His World: