By Nicholas Fondacaro | May 25, 2017 | 1:01 AM EDT

All of the negative news about President Donald Trump provided a convenient smokescreen to obscure a story highly damaging to former President Barack Obama on Wednesday. As first reported by Circa News, “The National Security Agency under former President Barack Obama routinely violated American privacy protections while scouring through overseas intercepts and failed to disclose the extent of the problems until the final days before Donald Trump was elected president last fall.” As would be expected, the Big Three Networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) completely omitted from their evening broadcasts. 

By Cal Thomas | May 24, 2017 | 1:28 PM EDT

Roger Ailes was no genius, not in the league of Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein. The founding chairman of Fox News Channel, who died last week from complications after suffering a fall, understood and respected Middle America from whence he came.

 

By Nicholas Fondacaro | May 24, 2017 | 12:30 AM EDT

The Hill’s media reporter Joe Concha took the liberal media to task Tuesday night, most notably CNN and MSNBC, for putting off the Manchester terror attack to squeeze in more time for Trump and Russia. “And look, there are some numbers around this that are just stunning. 105 minutes during the 7:00 P.M. hour,” he said during his appearance on Fox News’ Tucker Carlson Tonight. “This according to [a Media Research Center] study, was spent on Trump and Russia on CNN and MSNBC. Just 50 minutes [for the attack].” 

By Curtis Houck | May 23, 2017 | 3:22 PM EDT

As the news was unfolding out of Manchester, England on Monday night with what we now know was an act of radical Islamic terrorism, the 7:00 p.m. Eastern hours of CNN and MSNBC felt that it was more important to spoon-feed viewers the latest bombshell reports about President Trump and the intelligence community. 

 

By Tom Blumer | May 22, 2017 | 10:37 AM EDT

Thursday morning, Harvard Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy issued a report which confirmed what NewsBusters reported in April, namely that President Donald Trump "has received unsparing coverage for most weeks of his presidency, without a single major topic where Trump’s coverage, on balance, was more positive than negative, setting a new standard for unfavorable press coverage of a president." On Sunday, CNN's John Berman tried to cast Fox News as a conservatively biased outlier — as opposed to the relatively fair and balanced entity it has actually been during the Trump administration's early months — by selecting the results of one tiny element of the Shorenstein report and presenting it as if it was the study's comprehensive conclusion.

By Clay Waters | May 22, 2017 | 9:18 AM EDT

In the New York Times Sunday Review, chief Hillary Clinton campaign reporter Amy Chozick (who is writing a book on the campaign) tells tales from the makeup room at sexist, biased Fox News in “Hillary, Roger, and Me.” The story’s text box: “Ailes made female reporters look like models, and Clinton like a criminal.” Chozick’s distaste for conservative-leaning television was apparent. She implied that it was just a shame that “poetic justice” wasn’t served, and that Hillary Clinton didn’t bring down Trump and Ailes herself.

By Brent Baker | May 22, 2017 | 1:32 AM EDT

Unintentionally inane sentence of the weekend, from Jon Klein, the former President of CNN/US, on the legacy of the late Roger Ailes, founder of the Fox News Channel: “By unreservedly infusing news with a right-of-center agenda, Ailes popularized the notion that all journalists are biased.” You read that correctly: The media were not widely seen as biased until Ailes created a biased network.

By Brad Wilmouth | May 20, 2017 | 7:03 PM EDT

On Friday's Real Time show on HBO, liberal host Bill Maher took his latest opportunity to joke about the death of a prominent conservative as he recalled the passing of Fox News founder Roger Ailes. After some audience members immediately cheered and applauded the news, Maher went on to call it "comeuppance" and mocked the idea that one is not supposed to speak ill of those  who have just died as he accused Ailes of "making old white Americans more frightened and more ill-informed."

By Tom Johnson | May 20, 2017 | 10:59 AM EDT

The Nation’s Eric Alterman doesn’t mind that a few weeks ago, The New York Times added another conservative op-ed columnist. He just wishes it hadn’t been the “awful” Bret Stephens, who used to write for “the rubes who believe what they read in Rupert Murdoch’s Wall Street Journal” but now is tasked with impressing the “smarter and more sophisticated” readership of the Times.

By Clay Waters | May 20, 2017 | 8:51 AM EDT

The front page of Friday’s New York Times featured a graceless goodbye to former Fox News chairman and chief executive Roger Ailes (and an insult to Fox News viewers): “A Fighter Who Turned Rage Into a News Empire” by Clyde Haberman. Even upon his passing, the Times maintained its hostility toward a man who found a wide and instantly receptive audience who latched on to a point of view clearly absent from the mainstream media’s liberal universe.

By Rich Noyes | May 19, 2017 | 10:54 AM EDT

The liberal media are up in arms over President Trump’s labeling of the investigation into Russian hacking and the 2016 presidential campaign a “witch hunt.” All three broadcast networks led their Thursday evening newscasts with Trump’s use of the phrase, with NBC’s Lester Holt saying Trump was “lashing out.” Yet long before Donald Trump arrived in Washington, liberal reporters themselves employed the “witch hunt” slogan to discredit investigations into their Democratic friends, especially Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. But now that Trump uses the same tactic, it’s somehow deplorable?

By Tom Johnson | May 19, 2017 | 10:42 AM EDT

A 77-year-old man died the other day, and, according to The Nation’s Walsh, it should have been a major learning moment for the Republican Party. In a Thursday piece about the career and legacy of former Fox News Channel boss Roger Ailes, Walsh mused that the passing of the GOP’s “intellectual patron” might “serve as a warning to the party” that “anger, arrogance and seething resentment of a rapidly changing country can be fatal.”