By Clay Waters | December 6, 2016 | 4:19 PM EST

We’re just a few steps away from Putin-style reign in America under the Trump regime, New York Times media reporter Jim Rutenberg implied in his “Mediator” column on the front of Monday’s Business Day: “From Russia Comes a Warning for Americans.” Rutenberg used Tolokonnikova, who has also attacked Trump, to make dubious parallels between the Russian media situation and America’s: “...as an emissary from a dystopian political-media environment that seemed to be heading our way, with governmental threats against dissent, disinformation from the presidential level and increasingly assertive propagandists who stoke the perception that there can be no honest arbiter of truth.”

By Matthew Balan | December 5, 2016 | 4:32 PM EST

On Monday's CNN Newsroom, The Daily Beast's Dean Obeidallah bewailed the apparent power of "fake news," particularly after the Sunday shooting at a Washington, D.C. restaurant at the center of the "Pizzagate" issue. Obeidallah proposed a hypothetical scenario: "I wonder if a Muslim guy went to a pizza place with a gun...how that would have went down — I think much worse." The liberal pundit later claimed that "Donald Trump...is the great purveyor of fake news," and that "good people [are] misinformed; and in this case, this man was radicalized online. This is no different than ISIS radicalizing someone."

By Brad Wilmouth | December 3, 2016 | 5:43 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Saturday's CNN Newsroom, CNN senior media analyst Brian Stelter fretted that Donald Trump has a history of tweeting articles from "made-up websites," and then seemed to lump in "far-right wing" Breitbart News with his idea of "made-up websites." Stelter, who a few weeks ago included images of two NewsBusters articles without explanation in a report about "fake news," began today's segment with a reference to George Orwell as he defined "fake news" as "sites that are trying to trick you." Stelter:
 

By Tom Blumer | November 28, 2016 | 12:19 PM EST

How ironic it is that the announced death of Cuban Communist dictator Fidel Castro late Friday night coincides with the U.S. establishment press's obsession with smearing websites which dare to challenge their narratives as Russian-inspired "fake news."

Castro's original rise to power was arguably the product of a spectacularly fake dispatch written nearly six decades ago by reporter Herbert L. Matthews and published in the New York Times.

By Clay Waters | November 22, 2016 | 5:49 PM EST

As part of its rearguard attack against the “fake news” it thinks cost Hillary Clinton the election, New York Times reporter Cecilia Kang made the front of Tuesday’s Business Day with “Fact Check: This Pizzeria Is Not a Child-Trafficking Site.” Kang’s supportive article profiled James Alefantis, a pizzeria owner in D.C. and a mover and shaker in Democratic circles, whose restaurant was victimized by a sinister political hoax on social media. But the paper’s sympathy and interest in such victims of fake news are rather selective. The Times never printed a headline back in April 2015 that said: “This Pizzeria Does Not Hate Gays” when an innocent pizza place outside of South Bend was getting the full social media condemnation from the left, threats, phony reviews and all, all based on a phony premise.

By Brad Wilmouth | November 19, 2016 | 8:24 PM EST

In a pre-recorded piece aired on New Day Saturday, CNN's Brian Stelter included images of two NewsBusters articles as he complained that many people were fooled by "BS" and "fake news," with many sharing such material with others through social media during the 2016 presidential election. As the CNN media analyst fretted that Donald Trump's campaign had benefited from "fake news" articles, Stelter did not take the time to inform viewers of what he found to be "fake" about the NewsBusters articles that were included.

By Kyle Drennen | November 18, 2016 | 11:58 AM EST

On the heels of network coverage hyping liberal fears that fake news stories shared on Facebook and across social media fueled Donald Trump’s election victory, on Friday, NBC’s Today and CBS This Morning touted President Obama pushing the issue during a Thursday press conference overseas.

By Jorge Bonilla | October 25, 2016 | 1:46 PM EDT

Our last dive into the WikiLeaks trove yielded the proverbial smoking gun that confirmed our suspicion of collusion between Univision and the Clinton campaign. Below is an evolving timeline that confirms, beyond reasonable doubt, that Univision is inextricably joined with the Clinton campaign in corrupt purpose and deed.

By Tom Blumer | July 27, 2016 | 11:45 AM EDT

Gateway Pundit dubbed the Democratic National Convention's program Tuesday evening as "Criminal Appreciation Night." Site proprietor Jim Hoft certainly has a point. The party officially nominated a candidate for the highest office in the land who committed acknowledged and admitted criminal acts, but whom the FBI and the intensely politicized Justice Department chose not to prosecute. A former president who was impeached over admitted perjury, also known as a crime, was also a featured speaker.

Tuesday night's program also included an appearance by several representatives of "Mothers of the Movement." Here, as seen at the Dayton Daily News, is how Richard Thompson of Rare.us, a Cox Media-owned web operation, began his coverage of the "Mothers" appearance:

By Jorge Bonilla | July 11, 2016 | 10:39 AM EDT

When Univision announced its acquisition of the satirical fake-news purveyor the Onion as part of its digital shopping spree back in January, we expressed these concerns, which were confirmed by one particularly awful piece that ran last week.

By Tom Blumer | April 18, 2016 | 11:13 PM EDT

Earlier today, Tim Graham at NewsBusters covered a poll done by an Associated Press-led partnership which found that, in AP's words, "Just 6 percent of people say they have a lot of confidence in the media, putting the news industry about equal to Congress and well below the public's view of other institutions."

The poll noted that "Nearly 90 percent of Americans say it's extremely or very important that the media get their facts correct." How ironic it therefore is that the Pulitzer prize announcements this afternoon contained two glaring failures to "get facts correct."

By Tom Blumer | November 3, 2015 | 12:59 AM EST

Truth, the cinematic attempt to make heroes out of the agenda-driven journalists who produced and broadcast the fraudulent 2004 CBS News story about George W. Bush's Texas Air National Guard service, went into wide distribution this past weekend, with utterly disastrous box-office results.

Readers, in between moments savoring the film's apparent descent into oblivion — though it will almost certainly be revived in left-controlled high school and college classrooms for years to come — really should read William Campenni's writeup at the Daily Signal. It puts the final stake in the heart of any attempt by anyone with an ounce of sense to claim that Dan Rather's and Mary Mapes's 60 Minutes report has any remaining credibility whatsoever. After the jump, let's have some fun looking at the movie's weekend attendance figures.