On Thursday, Federal Reserve Chairman Janet Yellen suggested in a videoconference call, as translated into plain English by the Wall Street Journal, that "there could be benefits to allowing the central bank to buy stocks as a way to boost the economy in a downturn."


On Thursday's Closing Bell on CNBC, Rob Reiner repeated his charge that Donald Trump's supporters are "not all racists, but there is a strain there." Host Bill Griffeth wondered, "Don't you think just people are angry — they're angry at Washington; they're angry at their boss?" Instead of immediately pointing to "racism," Reiner admitted that "there is a big chunk of Trump supporters who are very upset at the income inequality." However, he added that "there is a strain of racism that's there — because when you go to the Sanders rallies, there are no racists at those rallies!"


During a Friday afternoon interview with Hillary Clinton, CNBC’s John Harwood asked the presidential candidate about the current FBI investigation into her e-mail practices.  Clinton defended herself from allegations of misconduct stating “I've been the most transparent public official in modern times, as far as I know.” 


Bernie Sanders is out of touch with the experience of many small-town Americans, CNBC anchor Kelly Evans hinted on the February 2 Closing Bell program. The local Walmart in her small town growing up was a "godsend," according to Evans, who was raised in Lexington, Va.


The RNC may regret its approval of John Harwood as lead moderator for Wednesday night’s GOP presidential debate on CNBC if recent history is any guide. The CNBC anchor and New York Times columnist admitted he and a producer helped make Rick Perry’s infamous “oops” moment even worse.


Apparently voters can expect to see Rick Harrison of History Channel's Pawn Stars hitting the campaign trail for Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio.


Wrapping up a segment on CNBC's Closing Bell on Tuesday, reporter John Harwood suggested that Hillary Clinton's use of personal email to conduct State Department correspondence may well have been just a case of "excessive caution" on her part.


On Friday CNBC’s Ron Insana and Fox Business News’s Charles Gasparino engaged in a Twitter fight that included cheap shots like “you will always be a fat slob i’d smack u silly but it wld be considered child abuse” from Gasparino and comebacks from Insana like: “you shall remain a single-source shill for whomever whispers in your ear. As for the smack down, not worried.”


In an exclusive interview with President Obama on Wednesday, CNBC chief Washington correspondent John Harwood lobbed this softball on the political fallout of the government shutdown: "Before the election last year, you said you thought there was a possibility your re-election would break the fever within the Republican Party. Didn't happen. Do you see this moment as a chance, through this political confrontation, to break the fever now?" [Listen to the audio or watch the video after the jump]

After the President proceeded to blame Republicans in Congress for the shutdown, Harwood actually challenged Obama on his attacks on the GOP: "I wonder about your tone lately. I have heard from you an increasing amount of exasperation, an edge, even mockery sometimes....And it gives the impression that you think that your Republican opponents are either craven or stupid or nuts. Is that what you think? And if you think so, does it help your cause to let people see that out loud?"


NBA Hall of Famer Charles Barkley made some stunning comments concerning the George Zimmerman trial Thursday.

Appearing on CNBC’s Closing Bell, Barkley not only said that he agreed with the verdict, but also that when it comes to race, “I don’t think the media has a pure heart…A lot of these people have a hidden agenda” (video follows with transcript and commentary):


When University of California at Santa Barbara professor Nelson Lichtenstein came onto CNBC to discuss bribery allegations against Wal-Mart De Mexico (a subsidiary of Wal-Mart), he got more than he bargained for.

Kenneth Langone, an investor who helped found Home Depot, had joined Maria Bartiromo for the full hour of “Closing Bell” on Dec. 18. Langone, who is also the CEO of Geeknet and has a net worth of $1.6 billion, challenged Lichtenstein fiercely, demanding to hear facts from him. When he found out the news source Lichtenstein was citing as proof, Langone took a jab at The New York Times as well.

Lichtenstein argued that the accusations against Wal-Mart were just the “tip of the iceberg” of a “larger pattern for the company” of the company moving into an area of finding local ways of doing things and imposing “its own business model, regardless, on these countries and on the communities there.” (See CNBC video)


Liberal fascism, anyone?  Add Barney Frank to the list of Thomas Friedman and Ray LaHood who regret that in the United States, that darn Constitution gets in the way of the enlightened class imposing its will on the rest of us benighted peons.

Sparring with Mario Bartiromo on CNBC this afternoon, Dem congressman Frank, expressing frustration at his inability to get through legislation he favors, lamented: "unfortunately, under this American system of government, you have these checks and balances."  Yeah, so unfortunate. If only Barney could be king for a day.  View the video after the jump.