By Tom Blumer | March 19, 2017 | 1:31 PM EDT

If a federal judge allowed a lawsuit to proceed alleging that police led participants in a far-left protest rally into a gauntlet of violence-prone right-wing counter-demonstrators, and that several protesters were pummeled and hurt as a result, it would be nationally prominent news. But the national establishment press, and the California press outside of the San Francisco Bay area, have just demonstrated that when the political affiliations of those involved are different, it's not news, even when the aggrieved protesters win a significant court victory affirming their depiction of events.

By Jay Maxson | March 18, 2017 | 3:43 PM EDT

Colin Kaepernick is a free agent and the chirping of crickets is deafening amid the silence among NFL general managers. One anonymous GM, quoted by The Mercury News, suspects the lack of interest shown in the controversial quarterback stems from the fear of fan backlash or hate for the former 49er who refused to stand for the national anthem last season.

By Clay Waters | March 6, 2017 | 9:02 PM EST

Thomas Fuller's New York Times piece pushed for a public works program in La La Land that comes with a big promise and a $64 billion price tag: A high-speed railway that will one day, theoretically, connect San Francisco and Los Angeles in less time than in takes to watch The Dark Knight Rises. The story’s headline and tone pit stingy, stick-in-the-mud conservatives against sunny, striving liberal futurists: “Silicon Valley Rail Upgrade Is Imperiled Amid G.O.P. Ire.” But some of the dirty details got lost in Fuller’s glittery view of the future of “high-speed rail” in California, the ones that less starry-eyed outlets like the Los Angeles Times have noted.

By Tom Blumer | February 14, 2017 | 8:20 PM EST

In his opening monologue and first guest conversation Monday evening, Fox News's Bill O'Reilly sharply criticized the national and local press coverage of the past week's immigration raids. In his Talking Points Memo opener, O'Reilly observed the press's utter failure to headline the fact that the raids targeted criminal illegal aliens, describing that failure not as press bias, but as "blatant dishonesty." The host's first guest then accused the press of deliberately drumming up uncalled-for "mass hysteria," and described the operation as "the same kind of operation they did conduct under President Obama."

By Clay Waters | February 2, 2017 | 7:25 PM EST

New York Times Emily Badger dominates all of page 3 of Thursday’s print paper, with “Immigrant Shock: California Offers Hint of Nation’s Future,” a long “Upshot” analysis operating under the unspoken assumption that Donald Trump voters were prejudiced and skitterish of different-looking people invading their neighborhood. She even roped Rush Limbaugh’s 1980’s Sacramento radio show into her essay as a marker of racist anti-immigrant hostility.

By Tom Blumer | January 28, 2017 | 8:28 PM EST

A January 24 item in the East Bay Times, which serves the San Francisco East Bay area, wondered: "What’s behind the spate of recent restaurant closures?" While it didn't ignore the problem, the article made only glancing references to current and planned increases in state and city minimum wages. Preliminary year-end statistics at the U.S. government's Bureau of Labor Statistics show that Bay area restaurant industry employment and even general retail employment have fallen, and are possibly headed towards a steep decline. One has to wonder how obvious things will have to get before the press takes the negative effects of the area's mandated sky-high minimums seriously.

By Tom Johnson | January 6, 2017 | 5:22 PM EST

The image of America as “a shining city on a hill” (or a similar phrase) has been a staple of conservative political rhetoric for several decades. In a Tuesday piece for The New Republic, Matthew Pratt Guterl, a professor at Brown University, adapted the metaphor for leftist domestic use: “The nation as a whole seems no longer interested in celebrating any vision of equity, justice, and mutual respect. We need new symbols desperately. Blue states—especially those with democratic supermajorities and friendly neighbors, like Massachusetts and Rhode Island, California and Oregon—can be those symbols. And they can turn that symbolism into meaningful practice and policy.”

 

By Curtis Houck | October 11, 2016 | 7:30 PM EDT

In a disturbing story first reported by the Los Angeles Daily News on Monday, a woman was arrested and charged with battery for allegedly spitting on a Trump supporter outside CNN’s LA bureau at an event originally aimed at protesting liberal media bias. Reporters Anita Bennett and Matthew Carey reported that the individual was taken into custody after having fled the media bias rally and fled to a coffee shop. 

By Tom Blumer | October 10, 2016 | 2:17 PM EDT

Three police officers were shot by a gang member Saturday afternoon in Palm Springs, California. Two of them have died. The third suffered nonlife-threatening injuries and was expected to leave the hospital Sunday. Once again, the deadly motivation seen in Dallas and Baton Rouge just three months ago, the desire "to shoot police," emerged. With the exception of one local newspaper, the press is failing to report the serious consequences of these hardened attitudes, namely that cop killings are way up this year.

By Clay Waters | August 29, 2016 | 3:48 PM EDT

New York Times economist-turned-liberal-hack-columnist Paul Krugman has a habit of accusing his political opponents not of being misguided, flat wrong, or even dumb, but actively wicked. Cruel rule is what Krugman thinks is going on in the red states of Texas and Kansas, as their limited-government approaches make them “States of Cruelty.” The text box: “Some ugly politics is local.” Krugman also spouted that it’s cruel to women to be pro-life, no matter how many baby girls might be saved, because he has made an unsubstantiated link between deaths of pregnant women in Texas and defunding Planned Parenthood abortion clinics

By Tom Blumer | June 20, 2016 | 5:52 PM EDT

The establishment press is thrilled over the City of Philadelphia's enactment of a 1.5 cents-per-ounce "soda tax" last week. Monday morning, Mayor Jim Kenney signed the legislation which its City Council passed last week.

Especially unseemly is the virtual euphoria over how so-called "public health" advocates gained their long-sought foothold into using the tax system to dictate personal behavior over (eventually) any and all food and beverage products it doesn't like. Instead of making the "we know better" nanny-state arguments which really form the foundation of their effort, the press is applauding Mayor Kenney for, in the words of New York Times reporter Margot Sanger-Katz, portraying "the soft drink industry as a tantalizing revenue source that could be tapped to fund popular city programs, including universal prekindergarten."

By Tim Graham | June 13, 2016 | 10:13 PM EDT

The Associated Press is still the king of the wire services, used by most newspapers and TV stations (and even radio stations, if you can find news on them). So when it acts like Associated Partisans, it still packs a political punch.

When Democrats plead guilty of taking bribes in California, somehow today the AP couldn’t use the word “Democrat” anywhere in the piece (and The Washington Post repeating the offense). But AP and the Post found the (R) when a state legislator in Vermont faced a sex-assault trial.