By Tim Graham | March 15, 2016 | 5:06 PM EDT

No one can imagine that the terms "Islam" and "filthy religion" would be associated with each other in the pages of The New York Times. But in the Sunday Book Review, an article on Tom Bissell's history of the apostles of Jesus Christ began with this stunning turn from poet Christian Wiman:

"Nietzsche believed that if only a Dostoyevsky had been among the apostles who followed Jesus, someone who understood the environment in which 'the scum of society, nervous maladies and "childish" idiocy keep a tryst,' we might have been spared centuries of ovine idiocy," he wrote. "One genius could have given us a work of ennobling art. Instead, we got 12 bleating sheep and one filthy religion."

By Matt Philbin | March 9, 2016 | 1:47 PM EST

Call it Harry Potter & the Goblet of Grievance. 

J.K. Rowling has run afoul of the Indian indignation industry. According to Huffington Post, the author is in heap-big trouble for not being sufficiently sensitive to the diversity within the “Native American wizarding community.” 

By Clay Waters | January 25, 2016 | 3:56 PM EST

The New York Times often uses its book review to make liberal political statements under the cover of criticism, whether by praising books by liberals that bash conservatives, or eviscerating books by conservatives that attack the left. Sunday brought the first kind, summed up by this online teaser: "Dark Money argues that the Koch brothers and a small number of allied plutocrats have essentially hijacked American democracy."

By Clay Waters | June 8, 2015 | 8:45 AM EDT

Primates of Park Avenue is a new memoir by Wednesday Martin that purports to examine and explain the preposterously well-off women of the Upper East Side of Manhattan, much like Jane Goodall studied chimpanzees. Martin's prominent pre-publication essay in the New York Times mocked those "poor little rich women" for betraying feminism by being "dependent and comparatively disempowered." Times reporter Anne Barnard reacted to the essay with a liberal political rant and the paper ran no less than three reviews. But the New York Post outclassed its rival in journalistic integrity, finding many factual errors that will result in the publisher slapping an asterisk on the book.

By Melissa Mullins | April 21, 2015 | 4:43 PM EDT

In case the adulatory media coverage of Hillary Clinton isn’t enough, there are the adoring Hillary Clinton children’s books. In August, Simon and Schuster will release Hillary Rodham Clinton: Dreams Taking Flight, a picture book for grade-schoolers.

The book is written by Kathleen Krull and is the story of Hillary Clinton’s childhood, her dreams of becoming an astronaut, her education, her experience as First Lady of Arkansas and the nation, and her campaign for president.  The book also includes inspirational quotes and messages (let's wonder if any are from the Bible, as she once claimed it was her “biggest influence”), as well as stories of the high points and a few of the low points along the way.

By Bill Donohue | February 28, 2015 | 10:51 AM EST

Janet Maslin has been reviewing movies and books for The New York Times for several decades, and up until now she has faithfully towed the newspaper's line on abortion.

Then she slipped. In a book review about a Chinese abortionist, she noted that once the "fetus" was born, "she has no right to take its life anymore."

By Mark Finkelstein | January 29, 2015 | 8:29 AM EST

Ayman Mohyeldin has suggested that Chris Kyle, the real "American Sniper," was a "racist" whose military missions were nothing less than "killing sprees." 

With opinions like that, you might imagine Mohyeldin to be some unhinged bloviator from the bowels of the anti-American far left. Or, an NBC foreign correspondent [who formerly worked for Al Jazeera] who regularly reports on events in the Middle East.  Which is exactly what he is.  Ayman vented his bile on today's Morning Joe.

By Matt Philbin | January 14, 2015 | 2:59 PM EST

Lena Dunham is blissfully untroubled by self-awareness. It’s a quality that might be endearing in someone less repulsive. But in a recent interview with Grantland’s Bill Simmons it comes off as the obnoxiousness of a spoiled brat.

Take, for instance, when the 28-year-old, who’s currently flogging her memoir (even Obama had the decency to wait until his early 30s), and much of who’s work in “Girls” is at least somewhat autobiographical said, “I never want to become someone where like what’s happening to me becomes the entirety of the reality of the world.”

By Tim Graham | October 8, 2014 | 7:13 AM EDT

It’s easily guessed that no one at the New York Times would welcome a book titled “The Assassination of Barack Obama.” But the Times is in love with a book titled “The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher.”

This book of short stories by British author Hilary Mantel graced the cover of Sunday’s book review, but mysteriously, that review by Terry Castle didn’t discuss the short story on killing Thatcher while she was Britain's prime minister until the penultimate paragraph. That’s because I missed the Gray Lady’s other celebrations of Mantel’s Maggie-murder tale.

By NB Staff | September 18, 2014 | 2:07 PM EDT

Paul Bedard of the Washington Examiner has been dogging the compilers of the formerly prestigious New York Times best-seller list for trying to deny best-seller status to conservative authors. First it was Dinesh D’Souza’s book America.

Now it’s David Limbaugh’s latest book Jesus on Trial. He reports the Times crew has “banished conservative legal author David Limbaugh’s latest, Jesus on Trial, from its upcoming best seller list despite having sales better than 17 other books on the list.”

By Tim Graham | September 15, 2014 | 4:43 PM EDT

Try this quiz on your conservative friends. Which so-called Republican offered a gooey blurb on the cover of the biography of liberal pro-abortion Texas gubernatorial candidate Wendy Davis?

A certain morning host on MSNBC thinks she has an "inspirational" story to tell.

By Cal Thomas | July 29, 2014 | 9:45 PM EDT

With his approval numbers sinking to 39 percent a week ago, according to the Gallup tracking poll, President Obama isn't alone in having a bad summer. So isHollywood.

Entertainment Weekly calls gross receipts for what should have been a blockbuster July 4-6 weekend "downright terrifying." Writes EW, "Not only were grosses down 45 percent from last year's holiday, according to Boxofficemojo.com, but it was Hollywood's worst July 4weekend since 1999. (And that's not taking into account inflation. In fact, this was the worst July-holiday weekend for ticket sales since the summer of Dragnet in 1987.)"