By Tom Blumer | January 23, 2017 | 10:50 PM EST

The New York Times reported Monday afternoon that NBC has suspended Saturday Night Live writer Katie Rich indefinitely for tweeting ... well, what? Reporter Dave Itzkoff failed to tell readers what Rich tweeted just minutes after Donald Trump was inaugurated as the nation's 45th President on Friday. Instead, he vaguely described it as "a widely criticized post she made Friday on her personal Twitter account in which she mocked Barron Trump, the 10-year-old son of President Donald J. Trump." That description required over 100 more characters than Rich's offensive tweet contained. Itzkoff's failure to quote is part of a trend.

By Tom Blumer | January 23, 2017 | 11:25 AM EST

On CNN's Anderson Cooper 360 on Saturday, Bakari Sellers described Saturday's "Women's March" as "something we haven't seen in this country or around this world in a very long time." Concerned Women for America CEO Penny Nance then pointed out the obvious, at least as far as the U.S. is concerned, which is that the Annual March for Life in Washington has routinely drawn crowds in the hundreds of thousands, and that January rallies in other cities, especially on the West Coast, have drawn ever-increasing throngs of prolife Americans. Nance clearly got under Sellers' skin when she questioned the validity of calling Saturday's event a "Women's March."

By Tom Blumer | January 22, 2017 | 8:45 PM EST

At 6:55 a.m. on Sunday, Angie Goff of NBC4 in Washington, whose Twitter handle is @OhMyGOFF, tweeted, "JUST IN: The White House releases statement ..." on Saturday's "Women's Marches" in Washington and elsewhere. Goff attached the alleged "White House" statement. 2-1/2 hours later, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer tweeted that "The White House has not issued a statement." Good grief.

By Tom Blumer | January 22, 2017 | 12:08 PM EST

Here's an episode which indicates that many reporters in the establishment press expect the worst from Donald Trump, and can't wait to put it out there when they think they have it. On Friday, when Time Magazine political reporter Zeke Miller didn't immediately see the bust of Martin Luther King in the White House's Oval Office where he expected to see it, his knee-jerk assumption was that it was no longer there. So he tweeted that it was gone, with no indication that he first attempted to confirm with anyone in a position to know that it had been removed. Sensing a golden opportunity, others in the press accepted Miller's non-observation and freely retweeted it.

 

By Tom Blumer | January 20, 2017 | 11:54 PM EST

On Tuesday, Kyle Pope, Editor in Chief and Publisher of the Columbia Journalism Review, posted "An open letter to Trump from the US press corps." Pope informed Mr. Trump, as if the man who is now this nation's 45th President didn't know already, that "while you have every right to decide your ground rules for engaging with the press, we have some, too."

By Tom Blumer | January 19, 2017 | 7:29 PM EST

An attempt by the Associated Press to smear Tom Price, nominated by Donald Trump as the next HHS Secretary, began Wednesday after the opening round of a Senate committee hearing. As of this writing, the wire service is up to its third such entry. The misleading reporting and hostility have increased with each dispatch.

By Tom Blumer | January 17, 2017 | 5:57 PM EST

Because he was the "singular 2016 (GOP) presidential contender never to fall in line behind Trump," Ohio Governor and two-time former presidential candidate John Kasich now has the Associated Press's deep respect. This largely explains why the wire service has been all too willing to ignore the fact that Kasich alone owns Ohio's impending budget problems.

By Tom Blumer | January 17, 2017 | 11:29 AM EST

On January 13, Kevin Freking at the Associated Press reported that Congressman John Lewis (D-Ga.) would be "joining several other Democrats who have decided to boycott" the presidential inauguration of Donald Trump. It further reported that Lewis "said it will be the first inauguration he has missed in three decades as Democrats and Republicans took the oath of office." The fact is that John Lewis boycotted the inauguration of George W. Bush in 2001 in very outspoken fashion. The AP has yet to correct the record — and the fact that it did not directly quote Lewis does not absolve them of that obligation. Additionally, the AP also reported Tuesday morning that no other congressman failed to attend Bush 43's inauguration. Contemporaneous post-inauguration news reports indicate that others besides Lewis were also absent.

By Tom Blumer | January 16, 2017 | 10:12 PM EST

On Friday, Georgia Congressman John Lewis, whose 5th District includes the City of Atlanta, said of Donald Trump that "I don’t see the president-elect as a legitimate president." Trump characteristically fired back with a two-part tweet firing back at Lewis. As would be expected, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution rushed to Lewis's defense. In its apparent haste to do so, a pair of journalists at the paper committed a colossal math blunder which vastly understated the city's crime rate, making the city look over 13 times safer than it really is.

By Tom Blumer | January 14, 2017 | 3:15 PM EST

In a January 5 column at the Oregonian, Douglas Perry promoted a study which claims to support the leftist meme that Donald Trump won the presidential election based on racial bigotry and sexism. It seems likely that the study to which Perry referred will become a frequent reference point for the left, so its fatal flaws need to be addressed. That's especially true because Vox.com founder Ezra Klein hysterically contends that the the study's evidence is so compelling, and that "The numbers here are impossible to read any other way."

By Tom Blumer | January 13, 2017 | 3:15 PM EST

Here we go again. A month ago, Robert Baer, a leading coddler of Iran who is an "Intelligence and Security Analyst" while pontificating at CNN, contended that alleged Russian interference in the U.S. presidential election meant that the nation needs "to vote again." Now The Hill has given space to Chris Edelson, an assistant professor of government in American University's School of Public Affairs, to advocate the same thing ("Remedy for Russian meddling should be new election").

By Tom Blumer | January 12, 2017 | 11:19 PM EST

Demonstrating the power of fake news to influence uninformed people, just-elected Democratic Senator Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire brought up a thoroughly discredited Washington Post story at the Senate confirmation hearing for Former General John Kelly. President-Elect Donald Trump has nominated Kelly to be the nation's next head of the Department of Homeland Security. Hassan brought up the Post's story on a late-December "infrastructure" attack by "a hacking group connected with the Russian government" on a Vermont utility as if it was an established fact — which, of course, it's not.