By Tom Blumer | July 30, 2016 | 6:52 PM EDT

Yesterday's news about the economy was the latest in a 7-1/2 year series of mostly regular disappointments. The government reported that nation's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) grew at an annual rate of just 1.2 percent in the second quarter, half or less of what most alleged "experts" expected. Additionally, the first's quarter's originally reported 1.1 percent growth was revised down to 0.8 percent.

The economy has grown barely 1.2 percent during the past four quarters. So even before yesterday's news, reasons to be impressed with the economy were hard to find. That didn't stop Mark Zandi, who "just so happens" to have contributed the maximum allowable individual amount to Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign in 2015, from going way over the top with praise. As reported by the Associated Press's Martin Crutsinger shortly before the GDP report's release, Zandi proclaimed that "It is amazing how resilient the U.S. economy has been," and the "The job market is just incredible."

By Tom Blumer | July 30, 2016 | 1:34 PM EDT

Now we know why Nicolas Maduro, Venezuela's de facto dictator, recently handed over responsibility for food production to the military: He's going to need soldiers on farms and elsewhere in the food distribution chain to keep conscripted workers in line.

That's because on July 22, now over a week ago, Maduro's government decreed "... that any employee in Venezuela can be effectively made to work in the country’s fields as a way to fight the current food crisis." Those words are from a July 28 Amnesty International press release. Amnesty correctly contends that the move "is unlawful and effectively amounts to forced labour." Amnesty appears to have taken six days to respond because the first reports from the world's press did not appear until Thursday. As of shortly after 9 a.m. Eastern Time Saturday morning, the Associated Press, despite having at least four reporters in Venezuela, still hasn't covered Maduro's order. Neither has the New York Times.

By Tom Blumer | July 29, 2016 | 9:59 PM EDT

Wednesday night's coverage of protests outside the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia delivered by Fox Business Network and the Associated Press could hardly have differed more.

FBN reported "thousands" of angry protesters oustide who were in no way mollified by Bernie Sanders' endorsement of Hillary Clinton or calls for unity. Geoff Mulvhill and Megan Trimble at the AP only described "tension ... that lingered in pockets of Philadelphia" during a "mostly quiet Day 3," and claimed there were only "hundreds" outside.

By Tom Blumer | July 28, 2016 | 2:14 PM EDT

On Tuesday, Harris County's prosecutor in Texas dropped the remaining criminal charges against David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt of the Center for Medical Progress. This ended a clearly politically motivated attempt to turn the tables on the pro-life heroes who showed that Planned Parenthood was trafficking in fetal body parts for compensation.

Predictably, the Associated Press did not handle the news well, essentially claiming that the CMP pair weren't prosecuted because of a "technicality," and continuing the myth propagated by Planned Parenthood by presenting as a supposedly indisputable fact that "The organization has said it never has and never would sell fetal tissue."

By Tom Blumer | July 27, 2016 | 11:45 AM EDT

Gateway Pundit dubbed the Democratic National Convention's program Tuesday evening as "Criminal Appreciation Night." Site proprietor Jim Hoft certainly has a point. The party officially nominated a candidate for the highest office in the land who committed acknowledged and admitted criminal acts, but whom the FBI and the intensely politicized Justice Department chose not to prosecute. A former president who was impeached over admitted perjury, also known as a crime, was also a featured speaker.

Tuesday night's program also included an appearance by several representatives of "Mothers of the Movement." Here, as seen at the Dayton Daily News, is how Richard Thompson of Rare.us, a Cox Media-owned web operation, began his coverage of the "Mothers" appearance:

By Tom Blumer | July 25, 2016 | 9:22 PM EDT

Throwing Debbie Wasserman Schultz under the bus apparently wasn't enough to calm the atmosphere at the opening of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Today, it became clear that like many others, Bernie's fans are not persuaded by the establishment press's predictable pro-Hillary posturing about how the convention will be "magic," with "perfect chemistry" between Hillary Clinton and her VP pick Tim Kaine, the "most qualfied ticket in history."

By Tom Blumer | July 24, 2016 | 10:41 PM EDT

In Munich on Friday, 18 year-old Ali David Sonboly gunned down nine people, seven of them teenagers, and injured 35, before killing himself. Though there appears to be no direct connection to nationalist or Islamic groups, witnesses said he screamed "I'm German" and "Allah Akbar" during his killing spree.

The previous paragraph tells readers far more about the massacre than certain news outlets have been willing to report. Two egregious such examples include the Associated Press, which, over 48 hours later, won't even reveal the killer's first or last name, and the BBC, which, until called out by critics, originally scrubbed his first name.

By Tom Blumer | July 22, 2016 | 11:01 PM EDT

Early this week, in an MSNBC interview, Tavis Smiley said that there's far too much attention being paid to "cop killers" and not enough to "killer cops."

Then, in a Tuesday USA Today column, he cast his sympathetic lot with Gavin Long, who killed three Baton Rouge police offices on Sunday before a police sharpshooter killed him. Smiley told readers that we should "Listen to the Baton Rouge police killer." Later in the week, he interviewed Corine Woodley, Long's mother, on his PBS show. Woodley's own words indicated that what caused her son to snap was that he bought into both the lies of the violent Black Lives Matter movement and the left's obsession with "the one percent."

By Tom Blumer | July 22, 2016 | 12:13 PM EDT

New York Times reporter Farhad Manjoo and his editors apparently are so insulated in their politically correct bubble that they fail to recognize embarrassing text anyone outside of that bubble with two eyes and and ounce of sense can clearly see.

In a Wednesday piece (Thursday print edition, Page B1) designed to portray Republican National Convention speaker, Donald Trump supporter and PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel as an outlier, Manjoo described Silicon Valley as a place of "militant open-mindedness" which will "severely punish any deviations from accepted schools of thought." Manjoo also illustrated how one Silicon Valley executive has allowed that area's culture prevent him from doing his own political homework. These are considered good things in Old Gray Ladyland.

By Tom Blumer | July 22, 2016 | 10:30 AM EDT

The headline at Dan Zak's Arts & Entertainment column at the Washington Post early Thursday evening: "We were promised a riot. In Cleveland, we got a block party instead." (There were occasional exceptions.) Though his article's tone was generally positive, he did complain that "Cleveland is basically a police state this week." Gosh, I didn't know police states had so much freedom of speech and expression.

What Zak found was "general comity," which included people giving out hugs and cuddles (seriously), and spontaneous outbursts of live music. So it's worth asking who made the "promise (of) a riot," or at least who built the expectation. To what should be no one's surprise, the Associated Press had a big role.

By Tom Blumer | July 21, 2016 | 3:09 PM EDT

Many leftists thought that they would attract huge, unprecedented crowds of protesters and cause a great deal of mayhem at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this week.

Tuesday evening at USNews.com, Steven Nelson, appearing to assume facts which have thus far not been supported by evidence, wrote that the protest crowds (and arrests) have been light "despite the nomination of Donald Trump eliciting a rage from progressives that rivals or exceeds their hatred of former President George W. Bush." Hmm, Steven. Maybe your premise is wrong. One of the protesters' excuses, at first glance, seems like a real howler — but if it's somehow actually correct, it's an argument to keep Ohio's gun laws exactly as they are, and to ensure that all other states follow suit.

By Michelle Malkin | July 20, 2016 | 4:58 PM EDT

My 12-year-old son couldn't remember the phrase "take a walk down memory lane" last week, instead describing a stroll through "nostalgia road." I knew it would come in handy. Put on your hiking boots and join me for an educational trip down good ol' nostalgia road. It seems like yesterday when Champion of Wimmin Maureen Dowd, bemoaning the lack of sympathy for anti-war mom Cindy Sheehan, declared in The New York Times that "the moral authority of parents who bury children killed in Iraq is absolute."