By Tom Blumer | December 9, 2016 | 5:15 PM EST

Some Democratic Party politicians who are searching for any and every possible reason to have a problem with President-Elect Donald Trump's cabinet appointments have latched on to the supposedly troubling fact that it thus far contains three retired generals out of 15 ultimate appointments. Naturally, their allies in the establishment press are amplifying these petty concerns.

The Associated Press's Lolita C. Baldor was a relatively early adopter, claiming a week ago, with alternating bouts of hyperventilation and hostility, that "Congress and others" are struggling with "a broader worry about an increased militarization of American policy" because of Trump's "move to pack his administration with military brass." Baldor has been an AP reporter for 11 years, covering matters relating to the Pentagon, counterterrorism and national security, so there's no excuse for her not recalling recent history which refutes her concern.

By Tom Blumer | December 9, 2016 | 8:21 AM EST

On November 24, as many of us were enjoying sumptuous Thanksgiving repasts and family time, the Washington Post published Craig Timberg's turkey of a report about how "a sophisticated Russian propaganda campaign that created and spread misleading articles online" to discredit Hillary Clinton and help Donald Trump.

Very recently, probably sometime Wednesday, the Post appended an "Editor's Note" to Craig Timberg's original dispatch attempting to distance itself from its own work product. It should satisfy no one.

By Tom Blumer | December 7, 2016 | 11:54 PM EST

Readers who have spent any time reading economic dispatches from the establishment press since the presidential election have likely noticed that its business journalists have taken to praising the alleged wonders of the economy President Barack Obama is passing on to President-Elect Donald Trump. Current reality renders the praise completely undeserved, but of course that's not stopping them from engaging in it.

By Tom Blumer | December 6, 2016 | 6:21 PM EST

At the New York Times on Friday, Amanda Hess regaled readers over how the "spontaneous" and "chance" sightings of Hillary Clinton since Election Day have made Mrs. Clinton "a new folk hero." Her virtual hagiography even made it to Page C1 of the paper's Saturday print edition. There's more sap in Hess's writeup than one could likely collect from all of the trees in the wooded areas in which Mrs. Clinton has "unexpectedly" appeared.

By Tom Blumer | December 6, 2016 | 12:09 AM EST

No review of the reactions of leftists and the establishment press (but I repeat myself) to the death of Fidel Castro would be complete without seeing what the wonderful, caring people at Black Lives Matter wrote after the Cuban dictator died.

BLM's reaction is posted at a website called Medium.com. Since that post doesn't link elsewhere, it was possible to hope that the content there doesn't officially reflect the group's views. Alas, that isn't so. The press's failure to mention BLM's sanctioned outrageous and offensive reaction to Castro's death, as well as its failure to even try to get comments from Democrats who would (hopefully, but who knows any more?) denounce and renounce the poison contained therein, up to and including President Barack Obama, is sadly typical and irresponsible.

By Tom Blumer | December 4, 2016 | 11:15 PM EST

A funny thing happened on the way to delivering Fidel Castro's ashes to their final resting place. According to an Associated Press photo caption, soldiers had to "push the jeep and trailer carrying the ashes of the late Fidel Castro after the jeep briefly stopped working during Castro’s funeral procession near Moncada Fort in Santiago, Cuba."

FoxNews.com had a sense of the symbolism: "The breakdown of the jeep in the midst of adoring crowds chanting 'Long live Fidel!' was symbolic of the dual nature of Castro's Cuba." AP news reports did not. They were too busy being awestruck by the "near-religious farewell to the man who ruled the country for nearly 50 years" to mention such a contradictory detail.

By Matthew Balan | December 3, 2016 | 10:56 PM EST

TheRoot.com's Jason Johnson unleashed on Donald Trump on Friday's CNN Newsroom, after the President-Elect called for unity at his Thursday rally in Ohio: "I don't believe anything that Donald Trump says about unity. I can see that from the administration that he's picked. I can see that from the policies he's proposed." Johnson targeted the billionaire for an apparent lack of women and "people of color" in his Cabinet. The guest also blasted his senior advisor, Steve Bannon: "He has a website that terrorists – white nationalist terrorists – consider to be their home base; consider to be their personal bible."

By Tom Blumer | December 3, 2016 | 4:34 PM EST

Did you know that some Donald Trump supporters actively advocated for repealing the 19th Amendment which gave women the right to vote almost a century ago? Or that Hillary Clinton, who memorably characterized half of Trump's supporters as "a basket of deplorables ... racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic, you name it," really "went high" as "her opponent went even lower" during the presidential campaign?

By now, many people know that Newsweek, which prepared alternative "Madam President" and "President Trump" editions for its post-presidential election issue, accidentally sent 125,000 copies of the "Madam President" edition to newsstands on Election Night. But that's not the real news here. What is far less known, and far more disturbing, is that the pulled "Madam President" edition includes the outrageous contentions just cited, as well as others which will be seen shortly.

By Tom Blumer | December 1, 2016 | 11:24 PM EST

A friend told me he couldn't wait to see the videos of crowds of cheering Carrier workers when Donald Trump arrived at the company's plant in Indianapolis to celebrate management's decision to keep a substantial portion of its production there instead of moving it to Mexico.

If there such are photos or videos out there, I haven't seen them. There may be a reason for that apparent absence or lack of prominence beyond the press's long-recognized desire to keep the public from seeing large, positive crowds at Trump appearances. The real concern here appears to be widespread recognition of the fact that the President-Elect, half of whose followers Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton outrageously described as "a basket of deplorables ... racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic, you name it," just worked to save the jobs of a workforce that is half African-American.

By Melissa Mullins | December 1, 2016 | 3:09 PM EST

Each year Dictionary.com and Oxford Dictionaries pick a Word of the Year that “embodies a major theme resonating deeply in the cultural consciousness over the prior 12 months.”  Of all the words they could have chosen, this year, influenced by the presidential election, the words “xenophobia” and “post-truth” were given the star treatment.

Both dictionary organizations chose their specific words because they felt they both had been major headliners for (liberal) news stories in 2016, and had seen a drastic increase of word lookups after the U.K. left the European Union (Brexit)  in June and after then presidential candidate Donald Trump secured the Republican nomination in July.
 

By Tom Johnson | November 30, 2016 | 9:23 PM EST

When Donald Trump is POTUS, he’s likely to get deferential, even helpful, media coverage, predicted Atrios on Monday. After all, he explained, that’s been the pattern for Republican presidents since the 1980s. When Ronald Reagan was in the White House, Atrios alleged, “members of the press knew that [he] had some form of dementia, that he was not actually fit to run the country, and they covered it up because the feefees of America would be hurt because Reagan was the most popular president in the history of the universe. Of course he wasn't the most popular president by any reasonable measure, but the press loved him so America loved him and they added 10 extra points to his popularity rating in their minds. They did that for [George W. Bush], also, too.”

By Tom Blumer | November 30, 2016 | 2:40 PM EST

One bad month of subscriber losses might have been considered a fluke, but two bad months in a row has to be setting off alarms at ESPN and parent company Disney. The once seemingly invincible sports juggernaut, which has exponentially increased its political posturing in the past several years, lost 621,000 subscribers a month ago, and shed another 555,000 during November (i.e., heading into December), according to Nielsen's December 2016 Cable Coverage Estimates ("monthly" reports are apparently issued on the closest Monday to the first of the month on four-week, four-week, five-week rotation).