By Jack Coleman | February 2, 2017 | 7:33 PM EST

Don't you love it when a person on the public dime insults you? Well, perhaps you won't be hearing as much of it in the future from National Public Radio while you're helping pay their budget with your taxes. With President Trump vowing to end federal funding of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which oversees NPR and the Public Broadcasting Service, the frequent disparaging of conservatives by NPR talking heads might emanate instead from the dreaded private sector, assuming NPR and PBS can survive there.

By Matthew Balan | January 12, 2017 | 11:07 AM EST

Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR played up the long-term effect of the anti-ObamaCare "death panel" talking point and labeled this phrase "fake news." Don Gonyea let President Obama; Anita Dunn, his former communications director; and a talking head from the left-wing Center for American Progress decry the "dishonest" message from ObamaCare opponents and lament the "lasting negative effect" of the "early disinformation campaign" against the law. He touted that "the false claims of death panels would be named the lie of the year by the fact-checking organization PolitiFact."

By Tim Graham | December 29, 2016 | 8:28 PM EST

Every nonprofit group is ending the year with a pitch for last-minute tax-exempt contributions, and that includes National Public Radio. NPR fans received an e-mail with the subject line "Bold, unbiased journalism." That's pretty funny coming from a network that puts a loving touch on Barack Obama in interviews and never secured an interview with Donald Trump.

Bob Dole in 1996 and Mitt Romney in 2012 also skipped an NPR interview.  So every GOP challenger in the last 20 years except George W. Bush skipped public radio. Doesn't that speak volumes?

By Tim Graham | December 11, 2016 | 9:14 AM EST

National Public Radio likes to think it's about civility (not rudeness) and real news (not fake news). But when it comes to Donald Trump, on Friday night NPR became the promoter of a rude and disparaging joke on All Things Considered. Washington Post columnist and NPR contributor E. J. Dionne passed along a joke from unfunny leftist Andy Borowitz in The New Yorker: that Trump's picks were so contrary to the government's mission that next he would name Mexican drug kingpin "El Chapo" to run the DEA.

By Tim Graham | November 26, 2016 | 8:07 PM EST

On their Friday Week in Politics segment on National Public Radio’s All Things Considered newscast, they discussed just how “ultraconservative” the early Trump cabinet picks are.  No one eight years ago discussed how “ultraliberal” Barack Obama’s administration would get.  But New York Times columnist David Brooks at least made this discussion of extremism amusing  by suggesting Trumpians were “headbanger Guns N' Roses conservatives.” This is amusing in part because GNR lead singer Axl Rose rants against Trump on Twitter.

By Tim Graham | October 27, 2016 | 9:46 PM EDT

NPR’s media correspondent David Folkenflik loves to report negative stories about Fox News, over and over again. Since July 6, he’s filed 16 negative reports on Fox News and the sexual-harassment lawsuits, leading to the departure of longtime boss Roger Ailes.

The least surprising story on Wednesday night’s All Things Considered was Folkenflik enjoying the Tuesday night Fox News fight between Megyn Kelly and Newt Gingrich. Like the other leftists, Folkenflik took the side of Kelly, scorning Gingrich as a finger-wagging old man losing voters for Trump.

By Tim Graham | September 3, 2016 | 11:01 PM EDT

On the Friday “Week in Politics” segment on NPR’s All Things Considered, liberal columnist E.J.  Dionne and “conservative” columnist David Brooks were as usual in agreement. Anchor Ari Shapiro asked about the FBI document-dump on their interview with Hillary about her private e-mail server. Dionne regurgitated the Hillary spin that these notes only underlined why FBI director James Comey recommended against indicting her. Then Brooks agreed, and compared her to a small poetry magazine.

By Tim Graham | August 25, 2016 | 9:05 PM EDT

“It's important to say right up front that this isn't a story about pedophile priests,” began the NPR reporter on Wednesday night....in a story with the online headline “Catholic Church Groups Fight Bills To Revive Old Sex Abuse Cases.”

Some legislators want to put in a "grace period" for new sex-abuse lawsuits outside the statute of limitations. The people who call their show All Things Considered didn’t consider this: Can we open the statute of limitations on rape allegations for Juanita Broaddrick to sue Bill Clinton? Would that seem fair?

By Mira Ebersole | August 19, 2016 | 3:36 PM EDT

“Should We Be Having Kids In The Age of Climate Change?” That was the audacious question NPR’s website and “All Things Considered” radio show asked on Aug. 18, as it promoted a college professor’s “radical” proposal that people need to have fewer children because of the “prospect of climate catastrophe.”

By Tim Graham | July 10, 2016 | 4:00 PM EDT

NPR.org published an article on Friday headlined “Abdul Sattar Edhi, Known As 'Pakistan's Mother Teresa,' Dies At 88.” Edhi was a Muslim man, not a Catholic nun, so...NPR didn’t run around looking for his harshest critics as they did for Mother Teresa in 1997.

Charity was a "central tenet of Islam," NPR reported this week, but they turned to leftist Christopher Hitchens in 1997 to decry Mother Teresa and her Catholic "enthusiasm for the dignity of poverty as 'Middle Age theology,' a destructive comfort to keep people poor."

By Matthew Balan | June 2, 2016 | 5:43 PM EDT

Wednesday's All Things Considered on NPR touted an eight-year-old boy who now dresses as a girl serving as an "educator" of sorts about transgenderism — first to his parents, and later to his neighbors and classmates. Correspondent Johnny Kauffman of Georgia affiliate WABE played up how "the city of Kennesaw, where the [boy's] family lives, is in one of the most conservative congressional districts in the country... [his] parents say they get a lot of questions from friends and other parents. But [he] remains the best teacher."

By Tim Graham | May 8, 2016 | 7:57 PM EDT

NPR announced on Saturday night that London elected “the first Muslim mayor of a major Western capital city.”  His name is Sadiq Khan, the son of Pakistani immigrants, and he is now one of the most powerful members of the Labour Party.

On Wednesday night’s All Things Considered, NPR brought London Evening Standard city hall editor Pippa Crerar to gush all over the prospect of Khan’s election as a globally “huge message” and cooing over Khan as a  “become...for freedom and tolerance.” Even as his opponents raised the issue of his connections to radical Islam.