In the last 36 hours, CNN and the Fox News Channel (FNC) came to blows following a report by CNN media reporter Dylan Byers that FNC host Sean Hannity whipped out a gun and pointed it at Juan Williams following a heated debate last year on the set of his eponymous show. 

 


During the panel discussion on the January 8 episode of Fox News Sunday, Juan Williams claimed that last week's torture of a mentally handicapped white man by four black adults "stirs up racial tensions already hot from the campaign rhetoric of Donald Trump," and that "white nationalists" would see this as an excuse to "legitimize acts of white racism." After the panel spent a couple of minutes dealing with a viewer's question about a perceived overemphasis on the "politics" of this crime instead of the fact that it was "a racial hate crime," Laura Ingraham circled back to criticize Williams's comment as "completely off base."


Fox News analyst Juan Williams offered a grand political post-mortem in The Hill newspaper this week: “Let’s agree on one fact: Donald Trump upended the political world with his win. But that incredible upset left an incredible hangover. The facts of political life are now subject to partisan interpretation.” So before 2016, the media had never offered facts with a “partisan interpretation”?


Fox News's Juan Williams apparently had a very bad Thursday morning on Twitter (readers will see why shortly), but out of respect for Kellyanne Conway's wishes seen in the video which follows the jump, I have resisted inspecting the carnage.

Williams reacted to the news that President-Elect Trump has appointed Conway as Counselor to the President by, in Fox Business host Maria Bartiromo's words, "questioning, well, Kellyanne has four kids, how is she going to do it?" Conway's three-pronged response to Bartiromo, with two prongs quite sharpened, neither towards Williams, will be seen in that video.


Author and talk-show host Laura Ingraham is being considered for White House press secretary. On Fox News Sunday, Ingraham demonstrated she was more than ready to come to the emerging administration's defense. After Fox analyst Juan Williams claimed Trump was nominating a "team of radicals," singling out Sen. Jeff Sessions and Gen. Mike Flynn -- something no liberal journalist said about Obama's Cabinet picks like Eric "Nation of Cowards" Holder and HHS secretary Kathleen Sebelius -- Ingraham took out a rhetorical hammer:


It's been ten days since Hillary Clinton made her "basket of deplorables" remark, claiming that "half" of Donald Trump's supporters, i.e., essentially one-fourth of all Americans, is one or more of the following: "racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic," and a catch-all in case she missed anything, "You name it."

Since then, the most revealing aspect of the fallout from those remarks, other than the fact the Mrs. Clinton couldn't bring herself to simply say, "I was wrong, and I am sorry," instead issuing an all too typical non-apology apology — is how many leftist commentators have come out and insisted that she was right in the first place, and that she therefore need not and should not apologize. Some pundits believe that she should have hit all Trump supporters with the "deplorables" tag. One of the more visible members of the "it really is half" club is columnist and Fox News contributor Juan Williams.


Leftist reporters and commentators have been tagging the "Make America Great Again" slogan of Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign as bigoted and hateful virtually since his candidacy began. Somehow, even though many of them surely recall it without having to do any research, they've managed to fail to note that Bill Clinton used those very words in 2008 to promote his wife Hillary's presidential candidacy against then-Illinois Senator Barack Obama. Clinton himself characterized Trump's slogan as racist earlier this week, even though he also used that exact phrase on at least four occasions to promote his own presidential candidacy in 1992.

Leave it to Fox News's Juan Williams, who has now admitted that he's among those who recalls Bill Clinton's past use of the phrase, to try to pathetically excuse all of this hypocrisy based on "context."


The right’s widely varied response to Donald Trump’s presidential bid may be the political story of the year so far, but many liberals have ignored it in favor of arguing that Trump’s worldview is a pure product of conservatism. For example, in a Sunday article, Chauncey DeVega claimed that Trump is “the logical result of at least five decades of Republican political strategy” and defined Trumpmania as “a mass political temper tantrum on the Right caused by a potent mix of authoritarianism and racism.”

“Much of the rhetoric, policies, and goals of the Republican Party and Donald Trump in 2016 are disturbingly similar to those of…the Ku Klux Klan,” declared DeVega. “This should be no surprise. The Republican Party is the United States’ largest de facto white identity organization. Conservatism and racism is now one and the same thing in the American post civil rights era.”


In just over the last 24 hours, the Media Research Center fetched two mentions on both CNN and the Fox News Channel (FNC) with the latter network devoting a segment to a study by MRC Culture’s Katie Yoder comparing network coverage of the Cincinnati gorilla shooting versus the latest violence in Chicago.


Saturday night was the White House Correspondents Dinner a star studded event attended by the media elites. Come Sunday morning most of the media was praising President Obama’s performance during the dinner, while expressing how disappointing comedian Larry Wilmore’s act was. Fox News’ Juan Williams really took it to Wilmore on Fox News Sunday saying, “to black America it awful. It was degrading...” 


In the first of two Super Tuesday 4 editions of FNC’s The Five, co-host Juan Williams sought to admit the obvious that much of the media has become obsessed with Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, but he didn’t employ such a term and instead awkwardly asserted that “[w]e’re all attracted to Donald Trump.”


Poor President Barack Obama.

Juan Williams, in a Monday column at The Hill, insists that "the president is not to blame for the rancor and polarization that have characterized his presidency," and "is not responsible for the unprecedented obstructionism employed by (Mitch) McConnell’s Senate Republicans." Why, In Williams's world, Obama has apparently been the very model of civility, while Republicans "have let anger and extreme voices define their party."