Well, it finally happened. President Trump pulled the final thread that has begun to unravel the entire world in a climate change apocalypse. Not really, but that’s the hysteria the liberal media was drumming up Thursday after Trump announced the United States would be withdrawing from the Paris climate change accord. The Big Three Networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) were mobilized later that evening to tear into the President. 


Many conservatives were in mourning Thursday after news broke of the death of Fox News mastermind Roger Ailes. In a statement, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell stated that “the Left would command a monopoly control of the so-called 'news' media but for the Fox News Channel, and FNC would not exist but for him.” But for NBC, it was a time to tear down what he did for conservative media and politics in general. 


During Wednesday’s NBC Nightly News, NBC’s chief environmental affairs correspondent Anne Thompson enthusiastically promoted the global warming agreement between the United States and China that was announced earlier in the day, but fretted that Republicans were “already putting up roadblocks if congressional action is needed.”

Anchor Brian Williams hyped that it was “[a] surprise announcement” and “a history making deal” that will “greatly reduce carbon emissions.” Those generous descriptions segued into Thompson’s report as she mentioned that deal was between the two nations that were responsible for “producing 39 percent of the world’s greenhouse gases last year.”


On her 12 p.m. ET hour MSNBC show on Tuesday, host and NBC chief foreign affairs correspondent Andrea Mitchell, along with chief environmental affairs correspondent Anne Thompson, gushed over President Obama's effort to push the climate change agenda. Mitchell touted how Obama "will be delivering remarks at the United Nations Climate Action Summit" and "is expected to call on world leaders to follow the U.S. lead on climate change..."

Thompson praised the White House: "I think what you do see is the United States is now coming from a position of strength. The Obama administration has set out a climate action plan, it has promised – it has got an agreement with the auto companies to double fuel efficiency by the year 2025. It is going to reduce carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, oil power plants by 30%." [Listen to the audio]


As if more proof were needed that the broadcast networks don’t get religion, and really don’t get Catholicism, analysis of the evening news programs from Feb. 11 showed a how inadequate the assumptions of liberal secular journalists were in explaining the Church, its mission and its role in the lives of the faithful.

On the day of the surprise resignation of 85-yr-old Pope Benedict XVI, ABC, CBS and NBC all danced the “The Papal Reporting Two-Step”: dwell on the negatives of the recent past before wondering hopefully if the Church will now finally step out of the dark ages of orthodoxy. Of the three, however, ABC was far and away the worst. Video after the Break.


Several media outlets on Sunday did their best to cast doubt on the legacy of Pope John Paul II as the Catholic Church beatified the late pontiff. NPR highlighted how the pope apparently "alienated many Catholics who began leaving the church in droves." CNN brought on a liberal theologian who claimed that John Paul II "led us backwards rather than forward." NBC played up the "avalanche of claims of sexual abuse by priests" during his papacy.

On Sunday's All Things Considered, Sylvia Poggioli, NPR's Rome-based senior European correspondent, turned to "investigative journalist" Jason Berry midway through her report, who blasted John Paul on his handling of the priestly sex abuse issue: "Someone who was so fearless in his confrontation with the communist empire, I for one do not understand how he could not have engaged in the same fearless introspection about the church internal." More than 3 years earlier, Berry, with the assistance of the Los Angeles Times, falsely claimed in a November 2007 opinion piece that the American bishops "had identified about 4,400 abusive U.S. priests," when that figure is actually the number of priests who faced allegations.