By Brad Wilmouth | November 29, 2016 | 11:34 AM EST

On Tuesday's New Day, after co-host Chris Cuomo argued that Donald Trump was "lying" by claiming there were millions of illegally cast votes, CNN political commentator Errol Louis brought up former President Ronald Reagan and smeared him as having made up a story about "welfare queens." Even though liberal sources like Slate and NPR admit that the "welfare queen" Reagan spoke of existed, the CNN commentator claimed Reagan "had all kinds of, you know, sort of, fables about welfare queens who did all kinds of things, and he never justified any of it."

By Brad Wilmouth | November 12, 2016 | 11:36 PM EST

On the heels of her Twitter meltdown over Donald Trump unexpectedly defeating Hillary Clinton, MSNBC host Joy Reid's AM Joy show on Saturday was not surprisingly chock full of race obsession. From guests accusing white voters of voting against their interests because of racism, to Reid claiming that there would be "neo-Nazism" in the White House, to accusations that black New Yorkers were "terrified" when Rudy Giuliani was mayor, racism was a recurring topic throughout the two hours of the show.

By Lindsay Kornick | October 26, 2016 | 12:44 AM EDT

On the ABC comedy American Housewife, Katie Ott bemoans Raisinets by saying they’re like “health food in a perfectly good bag of candy.” In this episode, I consider their depiction of Republicans as the unwelcome Raisinet in my candy bag. The only difference is that I can’t take it out.

By Brad Wilmouth | August 30, 2016 | 9:57 PM EDT

Appearing as a guest on Monday's CNN Tonight, liberal CNN political commentator and New York Times columnist Charles Blow charged that Republicans as a party are trying to "suppress" and take away the rights of America's black population as he argued against an African-American guest who suggested blacks should consider voting for Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton. Blow: "These are not the same kinds of parties. These are just not -- trying to pretend that they are, and to pretend to pretend that 'the Democrats have failed you and therefore you need to turn away from that,' it takes away from the fact that the Republicans are actively engaged in trying to take away your rights, actively engaged in trying to suppress you right now."

The liberal commentator also repeated the tired charge that efforts from the right to restrict welfare are rooted in racism, as he acknowledged that more whites than blacks receive welfare, because most of the conservative base allegedly believe incorrectly that more blacks receive welfare.

By Tom Blumer | August 22, 2016 | 5:50 PM EDT

On August 22, 1996, President Bill Clinton signed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act, aka "welfare reform," into law. Writeups today at USA Today and in the Washington Post would make readers believe that credit for this accomplishment belongs entirely to Bill Clinton, and that it was his advocacy that brought it all about. The truth is that "ending welfare as we know it" was a 1992 Clinton presidential campaign promise which languished in inactivity until 1996. The promise would have remained a long-forgotten slogan if it hadn't been for the persistence of the Republican-dominated Congress and the looming 1996 presidential election. That combination forced Clinton's hand — against his will.

By Seton Motley | July 18, 2016 | 9:40 AM EDT

It’s almost as if “Net Neutrality” is a Leftist safe word - to be uttered when the free market growing freely causes them too much discomfort.

Few things demonstrate the insular Media-Government Bubble better than this:

By Edgard Portela | June 10, 2016 | 12:44 PM EDT

House Speaker Paul Ryan and House Republicans have released a comprehensive plan to tackle poverty in America, but so far Univision and Telemundo have studiously ignored covering the proposal. The country’s top two Spanish-language television networks have failed to devote any coverage to the House Republican majority’s initiative, which aims to encourage work, improve education and tailor welfare to the needs of individuals.

By Tom Blumer | April 21, 2016 | 9:18 PM EDT

As the Washington Free Beacon reported today (confirmed here in a chart published two weeks ago), the number of Americans enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), traditionally known as Food Stamps, dropped below 45 million for the first time in almost five years (actually, 57 months) in January.

This is hardly cause for cheer, and does nothing to change the fact that in the vast majority of states, the Food Stamp program has been fundamentally transformed during the past eight years into a guaranteed income program. But to former longtime Washington Post reporter Eric Pianin, who has toiled at The Fiscal Times web site during the past six years, it was cause to go after House-led budget "cuts" and efforts at structural reform in an April 14 report riddled with laziness, errors and bias.

By Walter E. Williams | April 20, 2016 | 1:49 PM EDT

Here is what presidential aspirant Sen. Bernie Sanders said: "I believe that health care is a right of all people." President Barack Obama declared that health care "should be a right for every American." The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: "Every person has a right to adequate health care." President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in his January 1944 message to Congress, called for "the right to adequate medical care and the opportunity to achieve and enjoy good health."

By Tom Blumer | March 7, 2016 | 9:06 PM EST

Since the economy finally began consistently regaining jobs in early 2010, the establishment press has had a consistent, predictable and annoying reporting (and non-reporting) pattern.

It starts with the Friday morning jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics at or near the beginning of the month. Virtually without fail, it has spit out positive and sometimes even very positive seasonally adjusted increases in overall payroll employment (one small exception: the Census hiring season in mid-2010). Later that day, or in some cases a week later, but in either case in the late afternoon when most reporters are thinking about their weekends instead of their jobs, the USDA releases its report on enrollment in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), aka Food Stamps. If you didn't know that the economy was adding jobs, the Food Stamp figures would lead you to believe that it wasn't. Somehow, this is never news.

By Tom Blumer | February 29, 2016 | 5:34 PM EST

It appears that there's an effort underway to expand the definition of "deniers" beyond the realm of climate change/"global warming."

Ideally, in leftists' minds, a "denier" would be "anyone who doesn't accept leftist dogma without reservations." That definition would apparently extend to anything relating to the economy, if Associated Press White House reporter and dedicated Barack Obama groupie (yes, I mean "groupie") Darlene Superville had her way. Her story's headline, as she covered President Obama's remembrance of the wonders of the "Recovery Act" — formally known as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and informally known as the "stimulus plan — directly targeted those who dare to disagree with Obama, and even attempted to concoct another phony version of "consensus" clearly intended to eventually stifle historians' dissent:

By Brad Wilmouth | February 25, 2016 | 1:02 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Wednesday's CNN Tonight, liberal CNN political commentator Marc Lamont Hill provided a glimpse at the caricature of Democrats having over the top expectations of what government can accomplish in improving their lives as he recommended that black voters in South Carolina, when deciding between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, should "think beyond a limited sort of political imagination" and "say, 'Who has the capacity to make our dreams come true?'"