By Clay Waters | December 9, 2016 | 10:32 AM EST

The front of Friday’s New York Times featured Michael Shear's interview with Chuck Jones, the now-famous president of Indiana United Steelworkers Local 1999, who came under withering attack by president-elect Donald Trump on Twitter on Wednesday night, after claiming that “Trump lied his ass off” about how many U.S. jobs Trump’s Carrier move would actually save. The headline: “Trump as Cyberbully in Chief? New Twitter Attack Draws Fire.” But it's hypocritical of the paper to condemn Trump on the front page as a powerful person bullying an innocent private citizen, while letting intimidation of private citizens by Obama go unremarked upon.

By Tom Blumer | December 6, 2016 | 12:09 AM EST

No review of the reactions of leftists and the establishment press (but I repeat myself) to the death of Fidel Castro would be complete without seeing what the wonderful, caring people at Black Lives Matter wrote after the Cuban dictator died.

BLM's reaction is posted at a website called Medium.com. Since that post doesn't link elsewhere, it was possible to hope that the content there doesn't officially reflect the group's views. Alas, that isn't so. The press's failure to mention BLM's sanctioned outrageous and offensive reaction to Castro's death, as well as its failure to even try to get comments from Democrats who would (hopefully, but who knows any more?) denounce and renounce the poison contained therein, up to and including President Barack Obama, is sadly typical and irresponsible.

By Tom Blumer | December 1, 2016 | 11:24 PM EST

A friend told me he couldn't wait to see the videos of crowds of cheering Carrier workers when Donald Trump arrived at the company's plant in Indianapolis to celebrate management's decision to keep a substantial portion of its production there instead of moving it to Mexico.

If there such are photos or videos out there, I haven't seen them. There may be a reason for that apparent absence or lack of prominence beyond the press's long-recognized desire to keep the public from seeing large, positive crowds at Trump appearances. The real concern here appears to be widespread recognition of the fact that the President-Elect, half of whose followers Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton outrageously described as "a basket of deplorables ... racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic, you name it," just worked to save the jobs of a workforce that is half African-American.

By Tom Johnson | November 16, 2016 | 5:54 PM EST

In a Tuesday post, Esquire blogger Pierce complained that Ronald Reagan’s anti-government rhetoric discouraged many from voting, thereby benefiting Republicans, but Donald Trump’s anti-government rhetoric encouraged many to vote, thereby benefiting Republicans. Pierce noted that Reagan, in his first inaugural address, declared “that government was not a solution to the problem, that government was the problem.” The government-bashing, Pierce charged, was meant “not just to convert voters to conservative policies that were otherwise unpopular, it also was [meant] to frustrate people into apathy and non-participation.”

By Tom Blumer | November 16, 2016 | 12:36 AM EST

At a press conference in Greece on Tuesday, President Barack Obama claimed that when he came into office, "the economy was contracting faster than it did during the Great Depression, but we were able to intervene, apply lessons learned and stabilize and then begin growth again." Naturally, Elena Becatoros and Josh Lederman at the Associated Press and Gardiner Harris at the New York Times, all of whom were there, failed to report that statement and two others surrounding it, let alone expose how blatantly wrong Obama's claims were on so many fronts.

By Lindsay Kornick | November 10, 2016 | 2:22 AM EST

Though they may not have known it, Blackish just tackled one of the biggest issues surrounding the election: the blue-collar worker. Of course, I believe it was probably all a coincidence, but it actually is funny how it worked out - and I don’t say that often about ABC shows.

By Justin Ashford | November 4, 2016 | 1:39 AM EDT

The NBC comedy Superstore continues to insert pro-labor propaganda into its show. Thursday night's episode "Election Day" once again pits employees against their "unethical" corporation. 

By Tom Blumer | October 26, 2016 | 11:00 PM EDT

Joe Biden appeared on MSNBC's Hardball on Tuesday, and claimed that "You never heard me criticize the tea party." Millions of people with decent memories and the ability to hear know that this is not true. Those with longer memories know that Biden's strident criticisms of the Tea Party movement, its members and its political candidates and officeholders go back over six years.

By Tom Blumer | October 23, 2016 | 10:00 PM EDT

I hope I'm right when I contend that most people in Oregon aren't as dumb as the writer of a photo caption in an article found at Oregon Live, the web site of the Oregonian, apparently is (or, one hopes, is only pretending to be). The caption's writer, commenting on a 2.5 percent gross receipts tax — not an income tax, but a tax off the top on sales — claims that "One question Oregonians have about a corporate tax measure on the November ballot is whether it would increase costs for consumers." He further notes that grocery stores "are one industry that could raise prices to cover the cost of the tax."

By Walter E. Williams | October 20, 2016 | 2:51 AM EDT

If a person wants to go into business as a taxicab owner, what requirements should be imposed to protect the public? The prospective taxicab owner should show that he is honest and can operate a vehicle safely. His vehicle should pass a safety inspection, and he should have a liability insurance policy. Some cities require the purchase of an existing license, sometimes called a medallion. A medallion has cost as much as over $1 million, as in the case of New York City, and the cost has reached $700,000 in Boston and $360,000 in Chicago.

By Walter E. Williams | October 12, 2016 | 12:27 PM EDT

Detroit school students, represented by the Los Angeles-based public interest firm Public Counsel, filed suit last month against the state of Michigan, claiming a legal right to literacy based on the 14th Amendment to the Constitution. Ninety-three percent of Detroit's predominantly black public school eighth-graders are not proficient in reading, and 96 percent are not proficient in mathematics. 

By Erik Soderstrom | September 23, 2016 | 7:26 PM EDT

In its season two opener, NBC’s big box store comedy, Superstore, continued its sharp left turn left. At the end of the show’s first season, a majority of Cloud 9’s employees went on strike after the store manager was fired for “suspending” an employee, with pay, who had just given birth in the store because the corporate office had refused to offer maternity leave to its associates.