By Nicholas Fondacaro | November 6, 2016 | 1:20 PM EST

With Election Day just two days away, both ABC and NBC seemingly continued to try to slow Hillary Clinton’s descent in the polls, Sunday, by downplaying all the talk surrounding multiple FBI investigations into her activities. On ABC's This Week, Clinton lackey George Stephanopoulos tried to shutdown such talk from Republican Party Chairman Reince Priebus by flippantly declaring, “You're just throwing out a lot of words there.” 

By Clay Waters | November 4, 2016 | 3:03 PM EDT

How does a reporter write about the history of sexual harassment in D.C. without mentioning Bill Clinton? The New York Times managed it, in a sharply partisan view of sexual harassment in Washington on Thursday by political reporter Sheryl Gay Stolberg, “As Politics Meets Power, Harassment Flourishes.” There was nothing of the late Sen. Ted Kennedy and Chappaquiddick, or of more recent vintage, Democratic Rep. Alan Grayson’s domestic controversies. But conservative Justice Clarence Thomas was featured prominently, and two Republican senators received unflattering mentions as well:

By NB Staff | October 30, 2016 | 2:34 PM EDT

The Media Research Center’s Rich Noyes appeared on CNN’s Reliable Sources on Sunday to discuss his recent study, in which he discovered that an overwhelming 91 percent of network evening news coverage of Donald Trump was hostile to the candidate. “Tell us about how you came to that conclusion,” inquired host Brian Stelter, “What does that 91 percent number represent?”

By Kristine Marsh | October 27, 2016 | 12:34 PM EDT

Thursday morning on ABC’s Good Morning America, anchor George Stephanopoulos and commentator Cokie Roberts repeatedly cast doubt on the idea that Donald Trump’s sexual assault accusations could be false. After being grilled by Stephanopoulos, Trump dismissed the accusations as made up stories but that wasn’t adequate for ABC’s Cokie Roberts who reacted skeptically.

By Kristine Marsh | October 26, 2016 | 9:55 AM EDT

Wednesday, ABC had a field day talking about the fiery exchange between Newt Gingrich and Megyn Kelly on FNC’s The Kelly File Tuesday night. Anchors David Muir and Robin Roberts joined analysts Matthew Dowd and Jon Karl to trash Gingrich for badgering Kelly about the Clintons’ scandals. Muir asked what the Trump team “has to gain by taking on Megyn Kelly,” before the panel argued this would only hurt Trump more with women voters. Dowd then claimed Gingrich appeared to have lost his mind, while Karl added that bringing up Bill Clinton’s sex scandals was a distraction for the Trump campaign.

By Brad Wilmouth | October 21, 2016 | 9:20 AM EDT

Since a number of women have gone public with charges that Donald Trump groped or forceably kissed them in past encounters, there has been a pattern of the broadcast networks being more likely to use the words "sexual assault" in referring to Trump's behavior, while using more toned down or vague wording to describe accusations against former President Bill Clinton of behavior that is at least as severe. This double standard has especially recurred several times over the past week on ABC's World News Tonight.

By Clay Waters | October 19, 2016 | 3:14 PM EDT

On the eve of the final presidential debate, Wednesday’s New York Times went after Donald Trump cover to cover, with attempts to shame the Republican nominee and a cavalier dismissal of his allegations of election rigging as racist and paranoid, though the Times was quite amenable to Democratic conspiracy theories about Bush stealing the 2004 election. Wednesday’s off-lead story by Trip Gabriel was headlned “Few Answering Call by Trump To Watch Polls – Fraud Warnings Raise Intimidation Fears.” The text box cried racism: “Increasing worry about intimidation focused on minority communities."

By Curtis Houck | October 18, 2016 | 9:45 PM EDT

Between Monday night and late Tuesday, various media outlets made the bizarre comparison between Melania Trump’s CNN interview defending husband Donald Trump against allegations of sexual assault to the infamous sit down then-First Lady Hillary Clinton gave to NBC’s Today in 1998 where she denounced accusations against President Bill Clinton as part of a “vast right-wing conspiracy.”

By Clay Waters | October 17, 2016 | 2:51 PM EDT

The front of Monday’s New York Times continued the paper’s relentless and one-sided assault on Donald Trump’s campaign. First up, “Public Jolted As Campaign Turns Coarser -- Across Nation, Ripples From an Ugly Race” by Patrick Healy and Farah Stockman slanted toward Hillary Clinton while blaming Trump's comments for traumatizing women nationwide. In the lead slot story, “Officials Fight Trump’s Claims Of A Rigged Vote, Times reporters forwarded the worries of hard-left “civil rights” groups, while ignoring justified Republican concerns over vote fraud and relegating the firebombing of a local GOP headquarters to a single paragraph.

By Bill Donohue | October 17, 2016 | 11:55 AM EDT

The editorial in today's New York Times, "Victims of Priests' Abuse Face a Choice," must be challenged on several counts. Its principal focus is the new initiative by the Archdiocese of New York, the Independent Reconciliation and Compensation Program. This program is designed to deal fairly with claims of clergy sexual abuse.

 

By Brad Wilmouth | October 16, 2016 | 9:37 PM EDT

Appearing as a guest on Saturday's Smerconish show on CNN, Yahoo News correspondent Michael Isikoff -- formerly of both NBC and Newsweek -- recounted that, both in the 1992 presidential campaign and through the 1990s, Hillary Clinton "was very much a part of the damage control" around her husband Bill Clinton's past relationships with women as she "was focused on discrediting accusations of misconduct against her husband, discrediting women who had rumored about, who came forward to talk about relationships that they might have with Bill Clinton."

By Nicholas Fondacaro | October 16, 2016 | 11:06 AM EDT

In light of the numerous women who have come forward to accuse GOP nominee Donald Trump of sexually assaulting them, many in the media have questioned why leaders of the party continue to endorse him. The National Organization for Women President Terry O’Neill appeared on Politics Nation with Al Sharpton Sunday to discuss their petition to get them to unendorse their nominee. “Are you surprised that such Republican leadership seems to be sticking with him through all of this,” inquired Sharpton.