As News One Now managing editor and former liberal CNN contributor Roland Martin appeared as a guest on Sunday's The Point with Ari Melber on MSNBC, during a discussion of black suspects being shot and killed by police officers, the liberal commentator seemed unaware that more whites than blacks are killed by police as he declared that "it's going to have to take a series of white Americans shot and killed in a similar fashion for America to deal with this issue."

 


In the episode airing June 25th, Comedy Central’s Legends of Chamberlain Heights struck a blow against white appropriation with a smack at Rachel Dolezal along the way. “Chocolate Milk” deals with the white character Milk’s obsession with appropriating black culture and he looks for a way to become black – at least on the outside.


Airing on June 25, the 2017 BET Awards were hosted by comedienne Leslie Jones and mostly featured live musical performances. Otherwise, the focus of the awards was a message of encouraging Black Lives Matter social justice warriors, although, without the long preachy political sermons delivered in many other awards shows. References to people killed in police-involved shootings - including the acquittal last week of the officer who shot Philando Castile - were present throughout.


In an article posted yesterday, Salon politics writer Chauncey DeVega trashed Republican Rep. Steve Scalise as a "bigot" and accused the Republican party of being a "sociopathic" entity that has "weaponized" the Scalise shooting and is "drunk on conspiracy theories and other hallucinogenic beliefs." He also repeated the discredited claim that Scalise spoke to a "white supremacist" group in 2002, and even went so far as to claim that he was an "honored guest" for the racist group.


Wednesday night’s episode of NBC’s The Carmichael Show, “Cynthia’s Birthday,” presented a unique perspective on the use of the n-word. Jerrod Carmichael's family is appalled that his white friend, Drew, who owns the fancy restaurant they are going to for Cynthia's birthday, greets him as “my nigga.” There is discussion about leaving over the remark, but Jerrod defends his friend, saying that he’s “completely cool with it.” Jerrod’s father, Joe, (David Alan Grier) on the other hand claims that Jerrod was “racially slurred,” an occurrence “much worse than a terrorist attack.”


As the three broadcast network evening newscasts on Friday informed viewers that former Minnesota police officer Jeronimo Yanez was found not guilty of committing manslaughter last year against black motorist Philando Castile, CBS conspicuously omitted two facets of the case that help explain why he was acquitted. More than a year ago, Castile was tragically shot to death by Officer Yanez after Castile -- who had a concealed carry permit and therefore no criminal record -- informed the officer that he possessed a firearm during a traffic stop. 


As the Reverend William Barber appeared as a guest on Saturday's AM Joy on MSNBC to give his religion-based views on current events, host Joy Reid at one point seemed to worry about not being able to talk more about Republican Rep. Steve Scalise's conservative views and his history on "race," as she recalled the discredited story that the congressman spoke to a white nationalist event 15 years ago.


On Wednesday's Fox and Friends, as Fox News producer Greg Pergram reported in by phone in the aftermath of the attack on congressional Republicans in Alexandria, Virginia, he incorrectly recalled that it was the KKK that Scalise was accused of meeting with, when in reality the debunked accusation was that he spoke to a white nationalist group that was founded by David Duke. Additionally, Pergram failed to inform viewers that, even though Scalise issued an apology, the central claim that Scalise spoke to Duke's group was undermined both by a flyer from the event that did not list Scalise as a speaker, and by a man who helped organize the event who claimed that he invited Scalise to speak at a separate gathering that was not part of the white nationalist convention.


On Wednesday's All In, MSNBC contributor Jason Johnson still seemed to be clinging to the discredited story that Republican Rep. Steve Scalise spoke to a "white nationalist" group in Louisiana 15 years ago, as he suggested that the congressman has helped "exacerbate" tensions in politics. Near the end of the show, as host Chris Hayes suggested that liberals should ponder what their reaction would be "if the shoe were on the other foot" with regard to the Scalise shooting, Johnson suggested that politicians, including Scalise, do things to get votes that "exacerbate" tensions and "activate" people into violent behavior.


In a pre-recorded report on Thursday's New Day, CNN correspondent Randi Kaye repeated a discredited claim that Republican Rep. Steve Scalise 15 years ago spoke to a group founded by white supremacist and former KKK leader David Duke. As if the assertion that he spoke to the group were not in dispute, Kaye recalled: "Questions were raised about a speech he gave to a group led by former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke back in 2002."


In the wake of the shooting of Congressman Steve Scalise on Wednesday, many liberal journalists and celebrities on Twitter and other social media sites began exploiting the tragedy, lobbying for gun control or bashing Republicans. But, New York Daily News commentator Shaun King chose specifically to blame white people for the incident. Embarking on a Twitter tirade he tweeted out the following,“Instead of white people, in general, taking the heat for James Hodgkinson, he is almost instantly being called a liberal radical.”


There are people who appear to live in hermetically sealed bubbles, and then there's Chris Cillizza, formerly of the Washington Post but now at CNN. On the apparently safe assumption that he really thought President Donald Trump and the public would have a hard time coming up with answers, Cillizza challenged the Commander in Chief and, and in effect the Twitterverse, to "name a (news) story that is 'fake' or 'incorrect.'" A tidal wave of specific responses arrived in short order.