By Brad Wilmouth | July 27, 2016 | 4:11 PM EDT

In a pre-recorded report aired three times during Wednesday's New Day, CNN correspondent Manu Raju seemed to assume that criminal suspects who died after confrontations with police were victims of "racial injustice" as he recalled members of the group Mothers of the Movement who appeared on stage at the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday. At 5:11 a.m. ET, after CNN co-host Alisyn Camerota introduced the report referring to the group as "mothers who lost children to gun violence or police encounters," in the report itself, Raju described the group as mothers who "lost their sons and daughters to gun violence and racial injustice."

By Tom Blumer | July 27, 2016 | 11:45 AM EDT

Gateway Pundit dubbed the Democratic National Convention's program Tuesday evening as "Criminal Appreciation Night." Site proprietor Jim Hoft certainly has a point. The party officially nominated a candidate for the highest office in the land who committed acknowledged and admitted criminal acts, but whom the FBI and the intensely politicized Justice Department chose not to prosecute. A former president who was impeached over admitted perjury, also known as a crime, was also a featured speaker.

Tuesday night's program also included an appearance by several representatives of "Mothers of the Movement." Here, as seen at the Dayton Daily News, is how Richard Thompson of Rare.us, a Cox Media-owned web operation, began his coverage of the "Mothers" appearance:

By Curtis Houck | July 26, 2016 | 10:10 PM EDT

Right on cue, Tuesday night’s MSNBC coverage of the Democratic National Convention (DNC) heaped effusive praise on a team of Black Lives Matter mothers whose sons died in police-involved shootings as a “profound experience” for those in attendance just eight days after they trashed Patricia Smith over a speech about her son’s death in the 2012 Benghazi terror attack.

By Brad Wilmouth | July 26, 2016 | 5:16 PM EDT

Appearing as a panel member on Tuesday's special edition of Inside Politics, CNN senior political reporter Nia-Malika Henderson warned that "a lot of people" believe that GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump's invocation of "law and order" has a "racist undertone." Moments later, she went on to assert that the election is "all about race in a lot of ways," before backing off slightly by adding that "at least a lot of people think that.

By Kristine Marsh | July 26, 2016 | 3:20 PM EDT

On Tuesday’s The View, host Whoopi Goldberg openly admitted that she couldn't care less if the DNC rigged the system, because it was at the expense of “a white guy.” After revealing emails broke last Friday showing DNC officials had conspired to defeat Bernie Sanders, the ladies at The View became angry at Sanders supporters disrupting the Democratic Convention with their booing. Whoopi became enraged and ranted that they should be supporting Hillary Clinton because, “[The system] has been rigged against women for years!”

By Tom Johnson | July 23, 2016 | 1:17 PM EDT

The debate rages on as to whether Donald Trump has remodeled or vandalized the Republican party. In any event, left-wing pundits spent the week gaping at, and writing about, what they viewed as the grotesque spectacle of the RNC. For example, Daily Kos’s Hunter opined that the convention was "was barely one step up from an internet-peddled snuff film,” and Salon’s Heather Digby Parton declared that “all that’s left of the ‘three-legged stool’ of conservatism is the seat — racism, nativism and xenophobia.”

By Tom Blumer | July 22, 2016 | 11:01 PM EDT

Early this week, in an MSNBC interview, Tavis Smiley said that there's far too much attention being paid to "cop killers" and not enough to "killer cops."

Then, in a Tuesday USA Today column, he cast his sympathetic lot with Gavin Long, who killed three Baton Rouge police offices on Sunday before a police sharpshooter killed him. Smiley told readers that we should "Listen to the Baton Rouge police killer." Later in the week, he interviewed Corine Woodley, Long's mother, on his PBS show. Woodley's own words indicated that what caused her son to snap was that he bought into both the lies of the violent Black Lives Matter movement and the left's obsession with "the one percent."

By Tom Johnson | July 22, 2016 | 9:01 PM EDT

President Obama isn’t making relations between black and white Americans worse. Reality is making them worse, contends Bouie, who wrote in a July 15, 2016 piece that “black Americans—and Americans writ large—are reacting to facts on the ground, killings, and other incidents that put racial inequality into stark relief.” Bouie claimed that on racial matters, Obama has consistently urged “reconciliation and unity,” and that beliefs to the contrary are “nonsense” resulting from “a deliberate miscasting of Obama’s rhetoric.”

By Curtis Houck | July 22, 2016 | 2:03 AM EDT

After her MSNBC colleagues determined that Donald Trump’s convention speech Thursday night was a message derived from talk radio to “white America” that he would “protect” them, convention co-host Rachel Maddow stated just after the midnight Eastern mark that Trump serves as “a gateway drug” to transforming the GOP into one featuring people like David Duke (and by extension the KKK).

By Curtis Houck | July 22, 2016 | 1:04 AM EDT

Reacting to Donald Trump’s nomination acceptance speech to conclude the Republican National Convention (RNC), Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson and MSNBC’s AM Joy host Joy Reid ruled late Thursday that Trump channeled a “conservative talk radio” culture in pledging “to white America” that he would “protect” them from illegal immigrants and secularists. 

By Clay Waters | July 21, 2016 | 3:19 PM EDT

In Thursday’s New York Times, reporter Alexander Burns brought in Walter Mondale, failed presidential candidate in 1984, to bash Trump as a “hate advocate” in “Trump May Break Mold, but He Fits a Pattern, Too.” (A Nazi one.) Another aggrieved reporter defended Hillary Clinton from GOP “venom” that had a “strikingly sinister tone that makes the days of Swift-boating and Bush-bashing at past conventions seem tame.”

By Sarah Stites | July 21, 2016 | 11:30 AM EDT

Hollywood Oscar-winner Charlize Theron was selected as the opening ceremony speaker at the 2016 International AIDS Conference this week. In front of thousands of attendees, the South African actress and founder of the Charlize Theron Africa Outreach Project shared a pretty astounding fact – bigotry is the reason AIDS is still ravaging the globe.