On Friday morning's News One Now, host Roland Martin repeatedly ranted over the 33-year sentence that O.J. Simpson received almost a decade ago, even as the far-left commentator admitted he believes Simpson was indeed guilty of the prior offense of murder that he was acquitted of in 1995. After complaining that the judge in the 2008 armed robbery case had been "shameful" and "despicable," he charged that "white folks can't get over O.J.," leading one guest to provocatively mock whites because they lost a "precious white woman and a precious white man" who were killed by the former NFL star.


As all the major news networks this week have highlighted the tragic case of Minnesota bride-to-be Justine Damond being shot to death by a police officer, far-left News One Now host Roland Martin -- who sometimes appears on MSNBC -- has conspicuously given no attention to the story even while continuing to update viewers on high-profile cases of blacks being killed by the police.


The Women's March movement has received fawning and forgiving establishment press attention, particularly from the Associated Press and New York Times, since its first official event the day after President Donald Trump's inauguration. Now the movement appears to be (or at least should be) self-immolating for several reasons, most recently its unapologetic support for a 1970s convicted cop killer. That controversy has even pulled in the Black Lives Matter movement, which has also received consistent and undeserved favorable press treatment, also exposing BLM once again as consistently, violently radical. Now the AP and the Times aren't covering either group's direct association with this controversy.


On the Monday edition of his eponymously named PBS show, host Tavis Smiley provided a forum with little pushback for author and American University Professor Ibram Kendi to claim that the social problems that disproportionately exist within America's black population are the result of continuing racial discrimination, and that those who do not agree with his conclusions therefore must believe blacks are "inferior."


Too many people believe that slavery is a "peculiar institution." That's what Kenneth Stampp called slavery in his book, "Peculiar Institution: Slavery in the Ante-Bellum South." But slavery is by no means peculiar, odd or unusual. It was common among ancient peoples such as the Egyptians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Hittites, Greeks, Persians, Armenians and many others. Large numbers of Christians were enslaved during the Ottoman wars in Europe.


New York Times film critics A.O. Scott and Jason Zinoman remember horror zombie master George Romero on the front of Tuesday Arts page, “Old Master of Horror -- In George Romero’s signature zombie films, the living make for their own fright show.”


On Sunday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, during the show's regular "Gotcha" segment, host Al Sharpton was imagining racist dog whistles as he complained about "unmitigated, racially-tinged cruelty" from Congressman Steve King, and suggested that those who think like the Iowa Republican are "evil."

 


You can’t disagree with the left anymore without some sort of ulterior motive ascribed to you. After all, if you were a good person, you would think like them.

 


On Monday's CNN Tonight, correspondent Sara Sidner recalled reports of an 11 percent increase in hate crimes in California, but did not put into context that the state has recently suffered a general increase in violent crime -- that is about in line with the hate crime increase -- that has been linked to the release of many formerly incarcerated criminals.


The latest season of Netflix’s Canadian teen drama, Degrassi: Next Class, perfectly captures the left’s social agenda for 2017. The show’s 4th season, which was released July 7, features a character to represent every social issue liberals obsess over. More than half of the characters on the show are queer and/or non-monogamous, and the liberal propaganda in the show ranges from Syrian refugees (one of whom is a lesbian), to a gender non-conforming girl, to lesbian prom queens, to three students participating in a polyamorous relationship.


Aditi Natasha Kini blasted Hollywood portrayals of interracial couples in a Thursday item for the feminist website Jezebel — specifically, two movies about "a brown man wanting to date a white woman." Kini asserted that the films were "masturbatory fantasies." The writer singled out these movies for their depictions of "brown" women as "caricatures...and/or the butts of a joke." She contended, "Representation isn't a checklist, or an excuse for exclusion of more minoritized people. 'Representation' like this furthers white supremacy."


Journalist Sam Tanenhaus, who fancies himself an expert on the conservative movement (without actual evidence of such expertise), has a review of a shoddy attack book on the conservative movement by Duke University scholar Nancy MacLean, Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America. Many fatal flaws in the book have been spotted by conservative journalists, but it’s getting predictable raves in the liberal press and among shallow, wishful thinkers like Tanenhaus, who has supposedly spent at least the last 17 years writing a biography of William F. Buckley but spends most of his time making false links of conservatives past and present to racism.