By Tom Blumer | April 27, 2017 | 10:57 PM EDT

Yesterday, as Jay Maxson at NewsBusters noted, ESPN laid off 100 on-air personalities. One would think that an awareness of growing financial vulnerability might convince the network to keep its employees' and contributors' most radical impulses in check, lest even more subscribers and/or advertisers get alienated. That certainly isn't happening at ESPNW, the network's women's sports website.

By Tom Blumer | April 27, 2017 | 9:15 AM EDT

In a report which comes off as something it felt obligated to address but with as little meaningful information as possible, a story at CNN.com tells readers that "Murder Is Out of Control" in Baltimore — to the point where the city is begging the FBI for additional help. The story is so utterly devoid of background that those who haven't followed the city's woes closely could read it and believe that the problem just came along this year.

By Callista Ring | April 26, 2017 | 11:03 PM EDT

On Wednesday night’s episode of Shots Fired on FOX, “Hour 6: The Fire this Time,” the town of Gate Station, North Carolina became the site of violent, racially motivated riots, to the delight of Pastor Janae. As racial tensions in the town escalate, Pastor Janae follows through on her desire for another Ferguson. She urges a crowd to action by calling for a “fire to burn down police brutality,” “racism,” and “injustice.” Although she uses the word “riot,” she claims that this will be a riot of peace, not violence.

By Randy Hall | April 20, 2017 | 6:21 PM EDT

The National Geographic Channel announced on Wednesday, April 19, that it will collaborate with the Weinstein Company and rapper and businessman Jay Z -- whose actual name is Shawn Corey Carter -- to produce Race, a six-part documentary series that will offer “a stark and provocative look into systemic injustices in America.”

By Callista Ring | April 19, 2017 | 10:50 PM EDT

Wednesday night’s episode of Shots Fired, “Hour 5: Before the Storm,” officially established the show as over-the-top, race-baiting nonsense. While DOJ Special Prosecutor Preston Terry (Stephen James) and Investigator Ashe Akino (Sanaa Lathan) delve deeper into their investigation of the deaths of black, unarmed teen Joey Campbell and white, unarmed teen Jesse Carr, their discovery about the white, racist police department out to get black people takes an inexplicable turn. Akino pieces together that rich, white people are hunting poor, black people for sport. Literally.

By Walter E. Williams | April 19, 2017 | 6:27 PM EDT

As a group, black Americans have made the greatest gains -- over some of the highest hurdles and in a very short span of time -- of any racial group in mankind's history. What's the evidence? If one totaled up the earnings of black Americans and considered us as a separate nation with our own gross domestic product, we would rank among the 20 richest nations. 

By Alex Nitzberg | April 17, 2017 | 3:17 PM EDT

An April 10 Rolling Stone article featured an interview with Dr. Willie Parker, an abortionist who identifies as a Christian. Parker’s recently released book is titled “Life’s Work: A Moral Argument for Choice” and was ghostwritten by Lisa Miller according to NYMag.com.

 

By Erik Soderstrom | April 17, 2017 | 3:29 AM EDT

Showtime’s newest series, Guerrilla, premiered Sunday night to bring the rise of the British black power movement in the 1970s to the small screen. The show is tailor-made to feed the worst assumptions about police brutality and institutional racism. At least in the series premiere, the police are depicted as irredeemably corrupt, wantonly abusing their power to terrorize Britain’s black community, the embodiment of the modern Black Lives Matter movement’s most virulent rhetoric.

By Clay Waters | April 16, 2017 | 10:54 AM EDT

Earlier this month, New York Times Public Editor Liz Spayd criticized her paper for covering novelty stories at the expense of bread-and-butter game coverage. After talking about the tactics employed by the paper while covering the NCAA basketball tournament March Madness that focused on off-the-court stuff for a “sophisticated global audience,” a focus on international sports like soccer, and with “Groundbreaking investigative work” on problems like concussions and doping. As if to confirm similar concerns, the front of Thursday’s sports section featured the pressing matter of the Cleveland Indians baseball teams mascot Chief Wahoo, considered offensive by some activists: "Baseball Urges Indians To Phase Out Caricature."

By Tom Johnson | April 14, 2017 | 5:06 PM EDT

Whatever was the matter with Kansas when Thomas Frank wrote his book is now less daunting for the left, believes New York magazine’s Eric Levitz, who contended in a Wednesday piece that the closeness of this week’s House special election in the Wichita-centric 4th District appears to spell trouble for conservatives.

By Dan Gainor | April 14, 2017 | 7:42 AM EDT

The alt-left are like the Rosie Ruiz of politics. Ruiz won the 1980 Boston Marathon and she did it in classic liberal style. I’ll let Time describe it: “Ruiz made winning a marathon look easy. And it was, using her signature strategy: Don’t run the whole thing.”

By Nicholas Fondacaro | April 13, 2017 | 9:42 PM EDT

On Monday, a federal judge struck down the state of Texas’ voter ID law with claims that the law was specifically designed to target minorities. Seemingly just hearing about it on Thursday, CBS Evening News touted the development. “A federal judge has again struck down Texas' voter ID law, ruling that it is actually meant to keep minorities from voting. The state is expected to appeal,” announced Anchor Scott Pelley at the start of the segment.