By Brad Wilmouth | August 24, 2016 | 2:30 PM EDT

Appearing as a panel member on Wednesday's New Day, liberal CNN political commentator and New York Times columnist Charles Blow ranted about Donald Trump's recent appeals to black voters as being "the most horrible type of bigotry," as he hyperbolically asserted that "It is the kind of bigotry that says, 'I will knock you down while I pretend to pick you up.' It says that 'I am not talking to you, I'm talking to the guy behind you or over your shoulder.' It is the kind of bigotry that says, 'I am urinating on you and telling you to dance in the rain.'"

By Brad Wilmouth | August 23, 2016 | 7:43 PM EDT

Appearing as a guest on Tuesday's CNN Newsroom with Carol Costello, liberal CNN political commentator Angela Rye hyperbolically asserted that Donald Trump's "Make America Great Again" slogan reminds her of slavery and the days when black Americans were assaulted with dogs and water hoses. Even though the Republican presidential candidate has stated that the 1980s is an era that he believes America was "great," the CNN commentator linked his slogan to the days of extreme racism against the black population.

By Brad Wilmouth | August 23, 2016 | 9:15 AM EDT

On Monday's CNN Newsroom, host Carol Costello asked Texas Republican Representative and Donald Trump supporter Brian Babin whether the GOP presidential nominee should apologize for calling President Barack Obama the "founder" of ISIS as a way of reaching out to black voters. 

By Tom Blumer | August 22, 2016 | 5:50 PM EDT

On August 22, 1996, President Bill Clinton signed the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act, aka "welfare reform," into law. Writeups today at USA Today and in the Washington Post would make readers believe that credit for this accomplishment belongs entirely to Bill Clinton, and that it was his advocacy that brought it all about. The truth is that "ending welfare as we know it" was a 1992 Clinton presidential campaign promise which languished in inactivity until 1996. The promise would have remained a long-forgotten slogan if it hadn't been for the persistence of the Republican-dominated Congress and the looming 1996 presidential election. That combination forced Clinton's hand — against his will.

By Brad Wilmouth | August 22, 2016 | 11:38 AM EDT

Appearing as a guest on Sunday's CNN Newsroom with Poppy Harlow, CNN political commentator and New York Times columnist Charles Blow became the latest example of liberals accusing Republicans of racism when they talk about helping black Americans solve problems that they are disproportionately affected by, as he asserted that recent efforts by the Donald Trump campaign at "outreach" to blacks are just an excuse for the GOP candidate to speak negatively about blacks in front of white audiences.

After declaring that "This is just a backhanded way of criticizing black people in front of white people," leading host Harlow to bring up a clip of CNN political commentator Ryan Lizza suggesting that the Trump campaign was just trying to convince college-educated white Republicans that he is not racist, Blow reiterated his charge as he responded: "There may be something to that. I think it's worse than that, though. I do think that it is a backhanded way of criticizing black people in front of white people."

By Tom Johnson | August 5, 2016 | 8:42 PM EDT

There’s a famous line attributed to Henry Kissinger about the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s: “It's a pity they can't both lose.” Left-wing Washington Monthly blogger David Atkins adapted Kissinger’s quip for his Tuesday post about whether “vicious, ignorant megalomaniac” Donald Trump is “more contemptible” than “steely-eyed devotee of Ayn Rand” Paul Ryan.

By Tom Johnson | July 30, 2016 | 1:48 PM EDT

Is media bias just smart marketing? Yes, suggests Taibbi, who claims it’s “irrelevant” that “most individual reporters” are liberals given that their profit-driven, audience-conscious corporate overlords keep them on a short leash. “Whatever their personal leanings, influential reporters mostly work in nihilistic corporations, to whom the news is a non-ideological commodity, to be sold the same way we hawk cheeseburgers or Marlboro Lights,” argued Taibbi in a July 22 article. “Wars, scandals and racial conflicts sell, while poverty and inequality do not. So reporters chase one and not the other. It's just business.”

By Julia A. Seymour | July 25, 2016 | 10:11 AM EDT

They call it a comeback.

It is true, the U.S. economy is no longer in the depths of what has been called “The Great Recession.” But, in many ways the economy remains “weak.” Overall economic growth remains “subpar” and labor force participation rates remain shocking, not far from 38-year lows.

Then of course there’s poverty, food stamp use, weak wage growth and household income struggles. The average household is still making thousands of dollars less than they were before the recession. Those indicators tell another side to the story, one the broadcast networks haven’t said much about.

By Sarah Stites | July 21, 2016 | 11:30 AM EDT

Hollywood Oscar-winner Charlize Theron was selected as the opening ceremony speaker at the 2016 International AIDS Conference this week. In front of thousands of attendees, the South African actress and founder of the Charlize Theron Africa Outreach Project shared a pretty astounding fact – bigotry is the reason AIDS is still ravaging the globe.

By Sam Dorman | July 20, 2016 | 3:16 PM EDT

The 2016 Republican National Convention brought the radical, left-wing fringe out in Cleveland, and some of the groups’ ideas were downright ridiculous.

By Seton Motley | July 18, 2016 | 9:40 AM EDT

It’s almost as if “Net Neutrality” is a Leftist safe word - to be uttered when the free market growing freely causes them too much discomfort.

Few things demonstrate the insular Media-Government Bubble better than this:

By Tom Blumer | July 16, 2016 | 2:38 PM EDT

The latest installment in leftist excuse-making when socialism fails goes into the "It would work if leaders just had the right people handling things" file. It comes in the form of a Friday morning "analysis" at the Associated Press. Writers Jorge Rueda and Joshua Goodman want readers to believe that the economy in the Bolivarian socialist and once fairly prosperous nation of Venezuela would be in much better shape today if the military didn't botch the responsibilities de facto dictator Nicolas Maduro had previously given it to handle the nation's "battle against widespread food shortages." Now the AP pair believe it will get even worse, because the military has essentially been given total control in this area.