By Tom Johnson | July 30, 2016 | 1:48 PM EDT

Is media bias just smart marketing? Yes, suggests Taibbi, who claims it’s “irrelevant” that “most individual reporters” are liberals given that their profit-driven, audience-conscious corporate overlords keep them on a short leash. “Whatever their personal leanings, influential reporters mostly work in nihilistic corporations, to whom the news is a non-ideological commodity, to be sold the same way we hawk cheeseburgers or Marlboro Lights,” argued Taibbi in a July 22 article. “Wars, scandals and racial conflicts sell, while poverty and inequality do not. So reporters chase one and not the other. It's just business.”

By Julia A. Seymour | July 25, 2016 | 10:11 AM EDT

They call it a comeback.

It is true, the U.S. economy is no longer in the depths of what has been called “The Great Recession.” But, in many ways the economy remains “weak.” Overall economic growth remains “subpar” and labor force participation rates remain shocking, not far from 38-year lows.

Then of course there’s poverty, food stamp use, weak wage growth and household income struggles. The average household is still making thousands of dollars less than they were before the recession. Those indicators tell another side to the story, one the broadcast networks haven’t said much about.

By Sarah Stites | July 21, 2016 | 11:30 AM EDT

Hollywood Oscar-winner Charlize Theron was selected as the opening ceremony speaker at the 2016 International AIDS Conference this week. In front of thousands of attendees, the South African actress and founder of the Charlize Theron Africa Outreach Project shared a pretty astounding fact – bigotry is the reason AIDS is still ravaging the globe.

By Sam Dorman | July 20, 2016 | 3:16 PM EDT

The 2016 Republican National Convention brought the radical, left-wing fringe out in Cleveland, and some of the groups’ ideas were downright ridiculous.

By Seton Motley | July 18, 2016 | 9:40 AM EDT

It’s almost as if “Net Neutrality” is a Leftist safe word - to be uttered when the free market growing freely causes them too much discomfort.

Few things demonstrate the insular Media-Government Bubble better than this:

By Tom Blumer | July 16, 2016 | 2:38 PM EDT

The latest installment in leftist excuse-making when socialism fails goes into the "It would work if leaders just had the right people handling things" file. It comes in the form of a Friday morning "analysis" at the Associated Press. Writers Jorge Rueda and Joshua Goodman want readers to believe that the economy in the Bolivarian socialist and once fairly prosperous nation of Venezuela would be in much better shape today if the military didn't botch the responsibilities de facto dictator Nicolas Maduro had previously given it to handle the nation's "battle against widespread food shortages." Now the AP pair believe it will get even worse, because the military has essentially been given total control in this area.

By Tom Blumer | July 12, 2016 | 11:52 PM EDT

Tuesday's coverage at the Associated Press of the deepening humanitarian crisis in the Bolivarian socialist disaster known as Venezuela focused on the conditions in the ever-lengthening lines its citizens must endure in hopes of obtaining enough of the basics of everyday life just to survive.

Wire service reports often start off relatively brief and expand as reporters gather more information. That didn't happen with the AP's three Tuesday reports. Instead, Hannah Dreier's opening 11:51 a.m. Eastern Time dispatch was lengthy, with many compelling emotional and economic details. The second version of her report over an hour later was almost cut in half, and lost most of its power as a result. A final unbylined story at 3:39 p.m. — the one which most of AP's subscribers appear to have decided to carry — contained only 10 paragraphs, and even failed to note that the country whose people are now spending an average of 35 hours a week in line, and where 90 percent are saying they "can't buy enough to eat," is socialist.

By Edgard Portela | June 10, 2016 | 12:44 PM EDT

House Speaker Paul Ryan and House Republicans have released a comprehensive plan to tackle poverty in America, but so far Univision and Telemundo have studiously ignored covering the proposal. The country’s top two Spanish-language television networks have failed to devote any coverage to the House Republican majority’s initiative, which aims to encourage work, improve education and tailor welfare to the needs of individuals.

By Tom Blumer | June 3, 2016 | 10:51 PM EDT

A Pew Research report published three weeks ago on America’s Shrinking Middle Class presented a fundamentally misleading narrative which the press was only too eager to relay and continues to use, namely that the middle class has been seriously shrinking since the turn of the century. Christopher Rugaber at the Associated Press typified the initial press coverage, writing: "In nearly one-quarter of metro areas, middle-class adults no longer make up a majority ... That sharp shift reflects a broader erosion that occurred from 2000 through 2014."

The not particularly subtle message: "It all started with George W. Bush, and it hasn't let up since then." This post will disprove and thus discredit that notion.

By Daniel Garza | May 24, 2016 | 3:23 PM EDT

A fresh article from the Washington Post titled ‘Getting a photo ID so you can vote is easy. Unless you’re poor, black, Latino or elderly’ purports to establish that voter ID laws are inherently discriminatory against minorities. Towards that end, the bulk of the article presents the hardship stories of three prospective voters who struggled to obtain a state-issued I.D (all seniors, incidentally, ages 65, 72, and 85). Another insinuation? These are all voters Republicans would love to keep away from the voting booth. The article essentially parrots the Left’s case against ID laws, that requiring an I.D is a particular affront to minorities. Why? How little do liberals think of minorities that they honestly believe something as simple as obtaining an I.D can be too much for minorities to handle?

By Tom Blumer | May 9, 2016 | 6:08 AM EDT

Based on the content of John Kerry's Friday commencement speech at Northeastern University, one might have expected that those in attendance threw away their passports after the event ended.

That's because the Obama administration's Secretary of State told those in attendance: "You’re about to graduate into a complex and borderless world." Kerry's extraordinarily dense, naive and dangerous contention — the key soundbite of his speech — was ignored in coverage of his address at the Associated Press, Reuters, and almost everywhere else.

By Tom Blumer | May 6, 2016 | 11:34 AM EDT

The press is protecting Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton from the true extent of the blowback over her expressed desire to see coal miners lose their jobs and her bogus attempt to "apologize" for what she said.

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, appearing on Fox & Friends Thursday morning, identified a larger truth about Mrs. Clinton's callous disregard for workers and their families — people about whose well-being her party claims to be concerned: