On Friday's Real Time show on HBO, liberal comedian Bill Maher derided the Senate Republican health care plan as being like "a manifesto from the Zodiac killer," and trashed Republican Senator Ted Cruz as someone who does not believe the bill is "mean" enough, and who has experience at "making people sick." He ended the show with a commentary in which he encouraged his audience members to reproduce less and snidely portrayed children as "resource-sucking, waste-making human beings" who are bad for the environment.


On Thursday, the Associated Press played up the supposed impact of President Donald Trump's decision to the withdraw from the Paris climate accord by underlining that "some island states may not survive through the next 100 years." The wire service touted officials from some of these countries, along with several "experts," who predicted "catastrophic" effects on these nations.


The U.S. Supreme Court refused a lawyer’s appeal trying to force Chevron to pay almost $9 billion for pollution in Ecuador. Earlier court ruled the decision against Chevron was obtained through corruption actions.

Reuters reported on June 19, that the court’s decision not to take the case leaves earlier district and appellate court victories standing for the nation’s second largest oil company. Chevron’s court victories were previously ignored by the liberal news media years after CBS promoted the attack.


Deliberately polluting the air with high-volume diesel exhaust isn’t just a pastime for nihilists -- it’s an expression of “the key animating ethos in the decision-making process” of the Republican Party, claims Brian Beutler. The activity is known as “rolling coal,” and, as Beutler sees it, three years ago it resembled “many Obama-era protest trends” in that it was “a kind of obnoxious primal scream, indulged by an increasingly powerless subset of the population.”


On Thursday, President Donald Trump announced that the United States would be withdrawing from the Paris climate change accord, much to the chagrin of the ‘chicken little’ liberal media who declared the apocalypse was upon us.  CNN’s normally mild-mannered host Jake Tapper was visibly distraught during Sunday’s State of the Union when he was railing against U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley for how the U.S. now looked to the rest of the world. But when spoke with climate alarmist/hypocrite Al Gore he was at peace. 


During the Friday White House daily press briefing, CNN senior White House correspondent Jim Acosta berated EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt on behalf of planet Earth: “Why, then, is the arctic shelf melting? Why are the sea levels rising? Why are the hottest temperatures in the last decade essentially the hottest temperatures that we've seen on record?"


Well, it finally happened. President Trump pulled the final thread that has begun to unravel the entire world in a climate change apocalypse. Not really, but that’s the hysteria the liberal media was drumming up Thursday after Trump announced the United States would be withdrawing from the Paris climate change accord. The Big Three Networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) were mobilized later that evening to tear into the President. 


In an item likely targeted for mid-morning Saturday publication in the hope that few would notice it, the Associated Press's James MacPherson covered "SIGNS OF (an) OIL BOOMLET IN NORTH DAKOTA AFTER PIPELINE FINISHED." The "pipeline" in question is the Dakota Access Pipeline the hard-left so despises. Though it inexplicably took the AP reporter four paragraphs to identify the pipeline as the DAPL, the most remarkable aspect of the story was his specific identification of its vast economic benefits in the space of a mere three paragraphs.


Let's imagine that an activist for a conservative cause supported committing physical violence up to and including murder against people doing things he or she sees as "immoral" in a letter to the editor at a local newspaper, and that this same person was behind a state ballot initiative designed to limit the activities of those "immoral" people. No one would reasonably expect that the leading newspaper in the state involved would for all practical purposes ignore this person's activities. But from all appearances, the Denver Post has virtually ignored the violence-advocating Andrew O'Connor, as well as his co-sponsorship of a Colorado ballot initiative to double the severance tax on the "immoral" oil and gas industry, since April 19.


CNN's New Day Sunday gave an unchallenged forum to a group of children who are plaintiffs in an environmental lawsuit alleging that the federal government and fossil fuel industry are in "violation of the fundamental constitutional rights of young people and all future generations." As two of the children and one legal counsel -- Julia Olson of Our Children's Trust -- appeared on the show, among other questions, CNN co-host Christi Paul sympathetically posed: "If you could say one thing to the people listening who have questions about what they're causing in the environment, what would you like to say to them today?"


Each year, Earth Day is accompanied by predictions of doom. Let's take a look at past predictions to determine just how much confidence we can have in today's environmentalists' predictions. In 1970, when Earth Day was conceived, the late George Wald, a Nobel laureate biology professor at Harvard University, predicted, "Civilization will end within 15 or 30 years unless immediate action is taken against problems facing mankind." 


Left-wing filmmaker Josh Fox launched his latest film, Awake, a Dream from Standing Rock, online April 22 — after it premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Predictably, liberal media including Reuters, The Washington Post and The Hollywood Reporter heralded the movie and ignored inaccuracies of his earlier, biased documentaries attacking the oil and gas industry. The film was called “timely,” and “powerful.” Fox was even credited for his “deep understanding of pipelines” and for getting in the way of the indigenous people telling their story.