By Clay Waters | April 21, 2017 | 8:29 PM EDT

Amanda Taub’s “Interpreter” piece on the upcoming election in France, in Friday’s New York Times was snottily headlined “A Small French Town Infused With Us-vs.-Them Politics.” That town, Frejus, was no doubt also infused with current events, as suggested by the Times’ own lead story on Friday: “Gunman In Paris Shoots Officer; Terrorism Seen.” Taub managed to completely ignore that issue in favor of condescending theories about France’s “us and them” ethnocentrism, making Taub’s think piece chiding the town’s punitive politics (doubtless written before the attack) look both out of date and sanctimoniously naïve.

By Tom Blumer | April 21, 2017 | 10:41 AM EDT

The press's determination to gin up criticism of President Donald Trump at every conceivable turn was on clear display yesterday at the Associated Press. In its timeline coverage of the Paris terrorist attack which left one police officer dead and two seriously wounded, the AP deliberately twisted Trump's comment that it "looks like another terrorist attack."

By Julia A. Seymour | April 20, 2017 | 4:24 PM EDT

MRC Vice President of Business and Culture Dan Gainor called out the media for downplaying an Islamic connection to a recent shooting in Fresno, California. Kori Ali Muhammad, a black Muslim allegedly gunned down three white individuals and shouted “Allahu Akbar” when he was arrested. However the Associated Press tweeted the phrase in English as “God is Great.” The story only admitted later the Arabic phrase was uttered and the gunman was Muslim.

By Kristine Marsh | April 20, 2017 | 4:07 PM EDT

TIME Magazine just published its yearly listicle honoring the “100 Most Influential People” and a Women’s March organizer who just happens to also be a radical Islamist, made the list. While all three networks covered the annual honor in their morning roundups Thursday, none of the networks mentioned the more controversial names on the list, like Sarsour’s.

 
By Clay Waters | April 20, 2017 | 2:43 PM EDT

Reporter Somini Sengupta continued demonstrating her strange hostility toward Nikki Haley, the U.S envoy to the United Nations, in “Trump Envoy Aims to Show That Rights Are a Priority” in Wednesday’s New York Times. The text box read: “A discussion in the Security Council draws criticism.” It’s a follow-up to Sengupta’s previously, and widely condemned, Haley-bashing and ardent defense of the United Nations, which is evidently not at all “corrupt” like Haley rudely claimed. Sengupta tried to put Haley on the backfoot from the lead in her new story.

By Kristine Marsh | April 20, 2017 | 1:28 PM EDT

The hosts at The View couldn’t have been more thrilled with the news that Fox News ousted their longtime primetime personality Bill O’Reilly after multiple accusations of sexual abuse from female staffers and anchors. On the Thursday show, Whoopi excitedly told the audience that O’Reilly was “out” to loud applause, before boasting that the women at The View actually “broke with Bill” years ago, during a 2010 appearance on their show.

 
By Nicholas Fondacaro | April 18, 2017 | 11:27 PM EDT

In an absolutely shocking tweet late Tuesday afternoon, MSNBC’s Counter Terrorism Analyst Malcolm Nance stepped up and suggested that ISIS bomb a Trump property. “This is my nominee for first ISIS suicide bombing of a Trump property,” he tweeted in response to another one asserting that President Trump congratulated Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s election win for corrupt reasons tied to his tower. 

By Curtis Houck | April 18, 2017 | 6:08 PM EDT

As part of its coverage on the deadly Tuesday shooting at a number of Fresno, California locations (including a Catholic charities building), the Associated Press (AP) Twitter account went into full spin mode on behalf of the alleged Muslim shooter, claiming in a tweet that he “shouted ‘God is great’ before killings” instead of, you know, Allahu Akbar.

By Brad Wilmouth | April 14, 2017 | 10:50 PM EDT

Appearing as a guest on Friday's MTP Daily on MSNBC, liberal actor Mandy Patinkin of Showtime's Homeland series bizarrely suggested that "white men" in the government and military were "the bad guys" in their dealings with Muslims. His hyperbolic suggestion came as he recalled that the latest season of the show has turned toward portraying Muslims more sympathetically in reaction to charges that the show had stoked anti-Muslim sentiments in previous seasons. 

By Brigitte Gabriel | April 13, 2017 | 4:16 PM EDT

The recent Palm Sunday church bombings in Egypt are part of a much larger effort to extinguish Christians from the Middle East by radical Islamists. These attacks further illustrated not only the ongoing genocide taking place, but the disgraceful efforts by the media to look the other way.

 

By Tom Blumer | April 11, 2017 | 10:45 PM EDT

The Associated Press and the New York Times were in London early this week for the funeral and memorial ceremonies for Keith Palmer, the police officer killed by Khalid Masood on March 22 as the radical Islamist attempted to make his way towards Westminster Palace after running down and killing four pedestrians and wounding dozens of others in a rented SUV. Strangely (no, not really), they've ignored several UK press reports showing that Masood, contrary to what was reported in the days immediately following the terror attack, was listed as the contact person at a radical Islamist website, had ties to a mosque that "that urges Muslims to take up arms," and virtually sequestered himself from the outside world — except the internet — for three months before carrying out his attack.

By Clay Waters | April 11, 2017 | 1:49 PM EDT

The front of Tuesday’s New York Times featured a long essay by Sarah Lyall on Brexit, “A Mighty City Trembles at a Global Crossroad -- With Britain Leaving Europe, Can London Remain a Capital of the World?” The online headline was stark: “Will London Fall?” The NYT made a big production of it, with big photos over the fold on the front and inside, with Lyall “mourning” the supposed death of the famously “tolerant....open-minded” city. Counter-arguments about national sovereignty and overweening bureaucratic dictates were quickly dismissed as irresponsible right-wing journalistic myths. Lyall's reporting has betrayed a consistent bitterness over Brexit: Before the vote, she had mocked the movement in a front-page story by evoking Monty Python.