By Curtis Houck | November 5, 2015 | 9:23 PM EST

Thursday’s CBS Evening News led with the severe weather threatening those in the Midwest, but in addition to looking at the storm track and damage thus far, the storms were hyped as a consequence of global warming. Anchor Scott Pelley ruled in an opening tease that “[t]ornadoes in Texas” struck “on the same day that a new study blames climate change for a surge in severe storms and wildfires.” 

By Clay Waters | October 22, 2015 | 10:23 PM EDT

The New York Times featured more politicized environmentalist doom-mongering from Justin Gillis, the paper's chief alarmist, in "2015 Likely to Be Hottest Year on Record." Of course, the year isn't over yet, but that less-than-compelling news hook didn't stop Gillis from going beyond the stats to work in alarmist environmental and anti-"denialist" political points, while dismissing the inconvenient truth that temperature growth has stalled since 1998. Gillis has made a habit of establishing "historic" warming levels and pollution records that turn out to be rather less than they initially appear.

By Julia A. Seymour | October 1, 2015 | 5:46 PM EDT

Hurricane Joaquin hasn’t hit ground in the U.S. yet, and might not, but already a climate alarmist public relations shop is pushing “Journalists” to blame climate change for the storm’s strength.

Late in the afternoon, Oct. 1, Climate Nexus sent out a press release to the media claiming the storm was gaining strength “over [a] record-hot ocean.” That’s how the group promoted its “hurricane backgrounder,” designed to link the storm to global warming.

By Michael Greibrok | September 2, 2015 | 11:31 AM EDT

The seas are rising and Sandy-like storm surges are going to be a “new normal,” according to Slate.

Slate’s Bad Astronomy writer Phil Plait highlighted a NASA study that showed a rise in sea levels since 1992 in his Aug. 31 article. Repeated the fears of many climate alarmists, he blamed that rise on global warming and warned, “[w]e’ll see beaches disappear, coastlines changed.”

By Jeffrey Meyer | August 30, 2015 | 12:48 PM EDT

On Sunday’s Meet the Press, MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry blamed the growth of charter schools in New Orleans post-Katrina as one of the reasons the city has not improved since the storm. The MSNBC host proclaimed “for many who are African-American it's not a better city in part because this so-called success story in the schools also included charterizing the entire system, which also meant deunionizing all teachers."

By Tom Blumer | May 31, 2015 | 10:24 PM EDT

In a report on the relative infrequency of hurricanes in the U.S. during the past decade nationwide, and many decades in certain coastal areas, the Associated Press's Seth Borenstein detected a problem.

The problem is that those who contend that human-caused global warming is ruining our planet believe that hurricane frequency should be increasing, but it's not. So Borenstein tried to cover his tracks (bolds are mine throughout this post):

By Julia A. Seymour | December 3, 2014 | 11:02 AM EST

The Atlantic hurricane season has ended on Nov. 30, and once again it went out with a whimper. That was good news for coastal residents in the U.S., since the “weak” 2014 hurricane season continued the nine year “drought” of major hurricanes making landfall.

But the broadcast networks practically ignored the "good news."

By Laura Flint | June 5, 2014 | 12:35 PM EDT

According to CNN, “gender bias might actually kill you.” A new study released by the National Academy claims that “feminine-named hurricanes (vs. masculine-named hurricanes) cause significantly more deaths, apparently because they lead to a lower perceived risk and consequently less preparedness.” The liberal media was thrilled to find this supposed scientific proof of sexism.

Ed Yong of the National Geographic found that the study lacked credibility. While it looked at the death tolls of hurricanes dating back to the 1950's, when hurricanes only had female names, male names weren’t introduced (due to cries of sexism of course) until 1979. Meanwhile, Yong writes,  “hurricanes have also, on average, been getting less deadly over time.” Yong’s source, scientist Jeff Lazo, claims that the correlation may just be a statistical fluke, and “it could be that more people die in female-named hurricanes, simply because more people died in hurricanes on average before they started getting male names.”

By Kyle Drennen | May 23, 2014 | 4:00 PM EDT

NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams, who routinely hypes forecasts declaring climate change an imminent threat to humanity, made a rather stunning admission on Thursday night's broadcast while touting the 2014 predictions from the National Hurricane Center: "Overall, they're predicting eight to thirteen so-called named storms....One or two hurricanes, they predict, will be major, meaning category three or above. But, as you know, it is always the case in the inexact business of any forecast beyond five days, we shall see." [Listen to the audio or watch the video after the jump]

By Jeffrey Meyer | May 20, 2014 | 8:20 PM EDT

NBC Nightly News is at it again, trying to scare its audience about the impending dangers of climate change. Following two reports in early May, the Tuesday, May 20 Nightly News hyped how there’s “a new warning about some iconic American treasures including the threat to Lady Liberty herself.”

Fill-in host Lester Host introduced the segment by declaring that our “American treasures... might one day be something we read about in history books rather than places we visit.” [See video below.] 

By Jeffrey Meyer | May 5, 2014 | 9:11 AM EDT

Once again, NBC was out to scare its viewers about the threat of man-made climate change. Appearing on the Sunday, May 4 NBC Nightly News, Ann Curry narrated a 2 minute 30 second piece that attempted to instill panic in its viewers about the supposed dire state of the world’s climate. 

Curry began her report by showing video of cars falling off of a street in Baltimore, Maryland after a heavy rainstorm before bemoaning that this “is one example of extreme weather events that may be more common in the future.” [See video below.] 

By Amy Ridenour | January 3, 2014 | 8:31 PM EST

MSNBC's Chris Hayes is not happy that skeptics of the catastrophic anthroprogenic global warming (CAGW) theory, in particular, Matt Drudge, have been pointing out that in this age of global warming, it often seems very cold.

As the Washington Examiner's Charlie Spiering explained today (link includes video of Hayes):