Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR touted how many Muslims in the United Kingdom are blaming British media outlets for the Monday incident where a Welsh man drove his van into a crowd outside a mosque in London. In their view, "the way the media covers Muslims has fueled hatred of their community," as host Kelly McEvers put it.


In remarks so bizarre and out of touch that satirists at outlets like The Onion would have rejected them if someone had suggested their inclusion in a made-up story, London's police chief has described the diversity of the city's London Bridge terror attack victims and witnesses interviewed as positive things. Gregory Katz at the Associated Press did his part to play along with the charade by failing to identify the lack of diversity among those who carried out the attack.


In television it's called a "loop," the replaying of the same scene over and over and over again. The latest and most assuredly not the final terrorist attack in London last weekend was a "loop" that has become all-too familiar. The jihadists who claimed to be acting on orders from their god, killed at least seven and injured more than 45 others, some critically, with a brazen attack on London Bridge and in a nearby pub.


While others took time to reverently recall the feats of the men at Normandy on the 73rd anniversary of D-Day MSNBC’s Morning Joe chose to use it to bash President Donald Trump. Speaking of the men who led the invasion, John Meacham declared, “They created a world order that is now...under the gravest assault it's been in half a century.” The insults offered a sharp contrast to the treatment of President Obama on the same day in 2009 where Newsweek’s Evan Thomas declared, "I mean in a way Obama’s standing above the country, above – above the world, he’s sort of God."


Apparently Reza Aslan, the star and executive producer of CNN's Believer documentary series is among those who haven't figured out that whatever you put out there on the Internet stays out there on the Internet. In "apologizing" for his profane, since-deleted tweet directed at President Donald Trump Saturday evening after the London terrorist attacks, Aslan claimed that "it's not like me" to respond as he did in a "derogatory fashion." Your Twitter history says otherwise, pal.


On Sunday in London, CNN's Becky Anderson and an accompanying camera crew were captured by another videographer appearing to stage an anti-ISIS protest by a small group equipped with printed signs. CNN has denied staging the event, claiming that it "simply filmed" those involved, but it's clear that the affair was at the very least quite orchestrated and agenda-driven.


MSNBC's Richard Lui appears to be testing the limits of irresponsible media coverage of terrorist incidents. Up until now, the press has fretted in the aftermath of such attacks about possible retaliations or "backlash" against Muslims or others not involved in them, even though such misguided revenge-seeking has rarely occurred. Saturday evening, Lui worried about police "overreacting" shortly after terror attacks in London which, as of the time of this post, had taken the lives of seven innocents and injured 48 others, including 21 critically.


In the wake of the London Bridge terrorist attack, President Trump sent off some questionable political tweets where he called for a travel ban and criticized the mayor of London. The tweets were very much a part of the media coverage on Sunday, and it came with heavy condemnation. But during the 12 p.m. hour on MSNBC, anchor Thomas Roberts actually suggested Trump’s tweets were designed to trigger a terrorist to attack civilians in the United States. And he did it, not once but twice. 


Reza Aslan, the human brain eating CNN host of Believer expressed not the slightest hint of sympathy for the victims of the June 3 terror attacks in London on Twitter. Instead he was solely animated by intense hatred of President Donald Trump to the extent that he cursed him out as you can see in the following tweet:


Late Saturday night, London fell victim to yet another terrorist attack using a motor vehicle to mow down pedestrians.  As details were first coming out, Drudge Report put out a tweet which read: “Fear of new terror attack after van ‘mows down 20 people’ on London Bride…” Soon after, President Trump retweeted the message. The retweeting didn’t sit well with NBC Nightly News, who noted on their own account that “Pres. Trump has used Twitter to share news report on London incident. We aren’t relaying president’s retweet, as the info in unconfirmed.”


The terrorism scenario is always the same. Events repeat themselves, like in the film Groundhog Day. First the video of screaming innocents, as in Manchester, England, where an Islamist detonated a suicide bomb at an Ariana Grande concert, killing at least 22 people, many of them children, and wounding dozens of others.


Berlin-beat reporter Alison Smale reported in Friday’s New York Times her version of the media’s latest favorite anti-Trump take: The cold reception of President Trump compared to the embrace of the cool Barack Obama, in “Europeans’ Welcomes for Trump and Obama Are a Study in Contrasts.” While Trump was quoted as being a “danger for the world,” “rock-star” Obama was happily sprinkling “political stardust” over the prospects of left-wing European politicians.