By Tom Blumer | February 23, 2017 | 5:57 PM EST

Thursday afternoon, Morton County, North Dakota officials announced, roughly 24 hours after yesterday's 2. p.m. Central Time deadline, that "the main Dakota Access Pipeline protest camp is now officially closed." Outside of the major broacast networks, press coverage of the camp's imminent and now final closure has been and I suspect will continue to be light, as the holdouts' conduct has been injurious and disgraceful. In the final days, "protesters" who claim to be environmentalists exposed themselves as nothing more than pretentious, ruthless arsonists.

By Julia A. Seymour | February 22, 2017 | 4:51 PM EST

Authorities ordered the temporary evacuation of almost 200,000 people living near the Oroville Dam in California after spillway damage and erosion caused fear of death and devastation.

However, as The Mercury News reported Feb. 12, this spillway erosion might never have happened if federal and state officials heeded 2005 warnings and reinforced the emergency spillway with concrete.

By Tom Blumer | February 21, 2017 | 10:20 PM EST

A 2:00 p.m. Wednesday deadline to leave the area looms for hundreds of bitter-ender protesters at the Dakota Access Pipeline site following Donald Trump's January 24 executive order advancing its approval. Based on previous reporting I've seen, the presence of "hundreds" is a revelation. What's more, despite the oncoming environmental disaster caused by their trash, filth and abandoned items, up to and including cars and trucks, it's clear that most of those still there are standing by and observing the cleanup instead of helping with it. It's appalling that these immature, irresponsible children continue to receive presumptive press sympathy.

By Jorge Bonilla | February 21, 2017 | 8:39 AM EST

Univision's news division is quick to remind us, as we recently saw, that it has a political agenda that extends far beyond immigration. 

By Justin Ashford | February 20, 2017 | 11:47 AM EST

FOX's Family Guy takes a dramatic stance on GMOs debate on Sunday’s episode, “The Finer Strings.” Meg is in a school talent show and her group decides to write a rap to show their disdain for the company Monsanto and their genetically modified food products.

 
By Tom Blumer | February 11, 2017 | 4:17 PM EST

This post was going to be about the establishment press's handling of the story of the mountainous and environmentally dangerous accumulation of trash left behind by Dakota Access Pipeline protesters. When the spring thaw arrives, that waste threatens to seriously pollute the Cannonball River — yes, the very river protesters are claiming they wish to protect from pipeline spills. What's remarkable here, though, is what was found in an initial Google search on the topic. With all the coverage out there, Google has given pictorial prominence to item from an obscure, out-of-nowhere site which is a clear candidate for the "fake news" tag. That site's story bizarrely claims that even more trash is currently being brought into and dumped at the site — "to frame protesters."

 

By Clay Waters | February 10, 2017 | 5:23 PM EST

Hitting a journalistic nadir, the New York Times ran a deeply silly environmental piece by Tatiana Schlossberg (aka Caroline Kennedy’s daughter), “Trump Has Choices to Make on Climate Policy – What Would You Do?” written in the condescending style of a choose-your-own-adventure story at a 6th-grade reading level.

By Melissa Mullins | February 8, 2017 | 9:55 PM EST

If you were like one of the many viewers watching the Super Bowl LI, you may have seen a commercial from the American Petroleum Institute (API) with the catchy opening line, “This ain’t your daddy’s oil.” It was actually a play on General Motors’ 1988 commercial pitch, “this is not your father’s Oldsmobile,” in an effort to attract a younger generation. 

By Julia A. Seymour | February 7, 2017 | 1:25 PM EST

A federal agency discredited a common argument of climate skeptics in 2015, but now a whistleblower has accused the agency of misleading the public and playing politics. Not that anyone watching the network news would know it.

For several years, climate skeptics argued there had been a “pause” or hiatus in global warming beginning in 1998. Then, in June 2015, a paper from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration erased it. Many news outlets reported that NOAA study and accepted its claims, but on Feb. 5 or 6, the network evening news shows said nothing about the new whistleblower’s evidence against it.

By Kyle Drennen | February 6, 2017 | 12:12 PM EST

On Monday’s NBC Today, co-host Matt Lauer and substitute co-host Maria Shriver led a panel discussion reviewing some of Sunday night’s Super Bowl commercials and gushed over the “social awareness” of ads that pushed liberal agenda items like environmental activism, equal pay, and illegal immigration.

By Jay Maxson | and By Alexa Moutevelis Coombs | February 6, 2017 | 2:21 AM EST

If you just crawled out from under a rock and turned on Fox last night, you might have thought you were witnessing a presentation sponsored by the United Nations, instead of the Super Bowl. We weren’t treated to “We are the World,” but there was no shortage of advertisements pressing Americans to go the way of the world.

By Tom Blumer | February 4, 2017 | 3:33 PM EST

UPDATE, Feb. 7: On Feb. 5, Jake Tapper tweeted that "if you're concerned about things being 'incomplete' maybe consider adding into your post Manchin on same show response to rule." I attempted to find that video, and could not. If it was so important, and in the interest of balance, one would hope it would be part of the CNN video at the web link cited below — and it's not.

As Nicholas Fondacaro noted at NewsBusters Friday morning, CNN had a Thursday afternoon "You can't make this up" moment. While covering Congress's rescission of an Obama administration coal and mining industry rule, the network ran footage from the disastrous government-caused 2015 Animas River spill in Colorado and New Mexico in the background. As pathetic and embarrassing as that element of CNN's report was, government regulation correspondent Rene Marsh's one-sided and incomplete report as the Animas River footage ran behind her and The Lead host Jake Tapper was arguably worse.