By Lindsay Kornick | March 20, 2017 | 10:55 PM EDT

Netflix’s fourth Marvel series Iron Fist debuted on March 17th to, well, some lackluster reception, and I can’t say that I disagree. With an unfocused storyline, mostly dull characters, and some uninspired fight scenes, there’s barely anything redeemable in all 13 episodes. But the final nail in the coffin for this show would have to be the its swing-and-a-miss at anti-capitalist propaganda.

By Tom Blumer | March 20, 2017 | 11:33 AM EDT

In early February, Meetup.com, a site which until late January was all about "bring(ing) people together in thousands of cities to do more of what they want to do in life" by helping people subscribe to common interest groups and organize meetings, joined "the resistance." On Sunday, Steve Peoples at the Associated Press spent 14 paragraphs treating the moves as a brand-new effort, leaving only readers who get to his 15th paragraph to wonder about the financial impact thus far of the company's abandonment of all pretenses of neutrality.

By Tom Blumer | March 16, 2017 | 12:03 PM EDT

For all of its shortcomings and limitations, one very useful benefit of Twitter is that it has exposed the breathtaking ignorance of so many supposedly well-educated journalists. A recent stunning example involves April Ryan, who, after the first two pages of Donald Trump's 2005 federal tax return were illegally revealed Tuesday on MSNBC, tweeted: "So in 2005 @POTUS was not a Billionaire," because "He made in 2005 over 100 million dollars."

By James Powers | March 15, 2017 | 3:14 PM EDT

Wall Street has been brimming with optimism since President Donald Trump’s election, but Main Street’s optimism soared as well. Some say the new GOP health insurance bill may keep that going.CNBC reporter Kate Rogers said that “Main Street’s outlook post-election is still holding at historically high levels according to the National Federation of Independent Business.”

By Cal Thomas | March 14, 2017 | 2:01 PM EDT

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to spend $1.4 billion of New York's resources to solve the persistent problem of poverty in central Brooklyn. If he wins legislative approval, Cuomo, a Democrat, intends to spend the money on affordable housing, job training, anti-violence programs, recreational space, even obesity. Some cynics suggest the proposal is targeted at boosting Cuomo's presidential prospects in 2020, but let's give him the benefit of the doubt and take his proposals seriously.

By Julia A. Seymour | March 14, 2017 | 8:50 AM EDT

While financial news networks, companies and economists linked optimism over President Donald Trump’s proposed economic policies to the strong jobs report, only one of three broadcast networks — CBS — made that connection.

On March 10, The Bureau of Labor Statistics announced 235,000 new jobs were added in February — the first month entirely under the new president’s watch. The report shot past expectations by 38,000 jobs.

By Tom Blumer | March 11, 2017 | 8:35 PM EST

In a dispatch accusing the Trump administration of hypocrisy in expressing pleasure over Friday's jobs report from the government's Bureau of Labor Statistics, Associated Press reporters Jill Colvin and Christopher Rugaber, with additional assistance from Jonathan Lemire, either betrayed an amazing collective level of ignorance about what a households is, or were so blinded by the need to criticize Donald Trump that they didn't see how ridiculous they made themselves and their wire service look. The trio's error, shared by their editors if such people even exist any more, is so obvious that one simply has to believe that it's the latter.

By Curtis Houck | March 10, 2017 | 4:11 PM EST

Prior to the Friday afternoon White House press briefing, CNN’s Wolf attempted to tamp down on the Trump administration’s positive vibes regarding the February jobs report, wondering if President Donald Trump is really able to “claim credit” for such a strong month. 

By Tom Blumer | March 8, 2017 | 4:56 PM EST

There is little doubt that the big economic news Wednesday was payroll and employee benefits giant ADP's estimate that the economy added 298,000 seasonally adjusted private-sector jobs in February. Over seven hours later, the New York Times did not have the news on its website's home page — or even at its "Business Day" business and financial news web page.

By Tom Blumer | March 6, 2017 | 8:15 AM EST

What everyone knew would happen as a result of Philadelphia's 1.5 cents-per-ounce soda tax began materializing on Wednesday, as Pepsi announced that it would lay off roughly 20 percent of its workforce there over the next several months. Coverage at both Philly.com and Associated Press allowed the city to engage in fantasy by claiming without meaningful challenge, or even clarification, that Pepsi in particular, but clearly other beverage makers by implication, should be using profits earned elsewhere to subsidize their Philly operations.

By Tom Blumer | March 2, 2017 | 8:30 AM EST

A week ago, the Columbus Dispatch reported that Wendy's, the fast-food chain, announced "plans to install self-ordering kiosks in 1,000 of its stores — about 16 percent of its locations — by the end of the year." Although company officials observed 18 months ago that such a move would be inevitable if the trend towards laws demanding far-above-market minimum wages continued, both J.D. Malone's Dispatch story and the Associated Press's condensed version based on Malone's work do not mention minimum wages at all.

By Tom Blumer | February 24, 2017 | 8:30 AM EST

In June, the City of Philadelphia, in what was hailed as a "historic moment for public health," passed a deliberately misnamed 1.5-cent per ounce "soda tax." What anyone with a lick of sense could have predicted would happen is happening, and the national press is mostly ignoring the tragic results.