By Tom Blumer | April 24, 2017 | 7:06 PM EDT

A Sunday item in the San Francisco Chronicle covered what reporter Justin Phillips has found is a major challenge for that city's restaurateurs. You see, many of them are struggling with how much virtue-signaling is appropriate in the wake of the election of Donald Trump and that city's defiant insistence on remaining an illegal-immigrant sanctuary. In light of a recent Harvard study on the effect of higher-than-market minimum wages and dismal jobs data from the government, restaurateurs and the press which covers this industry and several others need to look harder at another far more important issue: how many of these establishments will be unable to remain in business.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | April 20, 2017 | 10:03 PM EDT

As Venezuelan ruler Nicolas Maduro struggled against violent protests against him, the U.S. based company General Motors had its means of production seized by the socialist regime Thursday. “General Motors tonight saying it's been forced to suspend its operation in Venezuela after the government there confiscated its factory,” announced ABC Anchor David Muir during World News Tonight, “GM forced to lay off 2700 workers, but vowing to fight this tonight.” Sadly, CBS was the only network not to report the theft. 

By Julia A. Seymour | April 19, 2017 | 11:52 AM EDT

The media were thrilled when a statue of a defiant little girl was placed opposite Arturo Di Modica’s famous “Charging Bull” on Wall Street. To the networks, it became a “symbol,” a “sensation” and female empowerment.

“Symbols spoke volumes,” NBC Chief Environmental Affairs correspondent Anne Thompson said of the statue “facing down Wall Street’s famous bull,” on March 8. The networks didn’t seem to mind that “Fearless Girl” was really a clever corporate advertisement for “SHE” — an exchange traded fund offered by State Street Global Advisors.

By Julia A. Seymour | April 5, 2017 | 5:28 PM EDT

President Donald Trump got elected with promises to rev up the economy and create millions of jobs, so he has made sitting down with CEOs, executives and small business leaders a priority. Only it’s been a media priority to ignore it.

On April 4, Trump was at it again — holding more meetings — this time, a speech to trade leaders and a town hall with 50 CEOs, according to Fox Business. None of the network news programs mentioned it that night. Adding those executives to another 49 separate CEOs he already met with, Trump has sat down with at least 99 business leaders since taking office.

By Seton Motley | April 3, 2017 | 12:20 PM EDT

It’s always sadly amusing to watch America’s media march as one - in one direction after another.  To even the average observer, it would appear that they all receive the exact same issues to cover - and the exact same talking points with which to cover them.

The examples of this are at this point nigh limitless.  Talk radio impresario Rush Limbaugh has for years compiled his Media Montages - audio cavalcades of talking heads spouting identical words to describe the same stories.

By Christian Robey | March 31, 2017 | 6:08 PM EDT

This past week, President Trump issued a sweeping executive order unraveling a host of energy regulations enacted by President Obama. Predictably the news media were beside themselves over the matter. As my colleagues at Newsbusters adroitly pointed out, ABC, CBS, and NBC were in full panic mode. 

By Julia A. Seymour | March 28, 2017 | 1:03 PM EDT

The outrage culture is always finding something new to be angry about. This time it was over a business choosing to enforce its rules about how representatives of the company should be dressed.

But that’s not how most people heard the story thanks to the media frenzy, social media and celebrities who rushed to attack United Airlines. NPR called the company’s responses “astonishingly tone-deaf,” a contributor to The Huffington Post reacted by telling Uber that United’s “‘Leggings-Gate’ Just Made You Look Good,” while Fortune’s associate editor Anne VanderMey penned an entire commentary headlined “Leggings Should Be Worn on Planes, and the Office, and Everywhere Else.”

By Lindsay Kornick | March 20, 2017 | 10:55 PM EDT

Netflix’s fourth Marvel series Iron Fist debuted on March 17th to, well, some lackluster reception, and I can’t say that I disagree. With an unfocused storyline, mostly dull characters, and some uninspired fight scenes, there’s barely anything redeemable in all 13 episodes. But the final nail in the coffin for this show would have to be the its swing-and-a-miss at anti-capitalist propaganda.

By Tom Blumer | March 20, 2017 | 11:33 AM EDT

In early February, Meetup.com, a site which until late January was all about "bring(ing) people together in thousands of cities to do more of what they want to do in life" by helping people subscribe to common interest groups and organize meetings, joined "the resistance." On Sunday, Steve Peoples at the Associated Press spent 14 paragraphs treating the moves as a brand-new effort, leaving only readers who get to his 15th paragraph to wonder about the financial impact thus far of the company's abandonment of all pretenses of neutrality.

By Tom Blumer | March 16, 2017 | 12:03 PM EDT

For all of its shortcomings and limitations, one very useful benefit of Twitter is that it has exposed the breathtaking ignorance of so many supposedly well-educated journalists. A recent stunning example involves April Ryan, who, after the first two pages of Donald Trump's 2005 federal tax return were illegally revealed Tuesday on MSNBC, tweeted: "So in 2005 @POTUS was not a Billionaire," because "He made in 2005 over 100 million dollars."

By James Powers | March 15, 2017 | 3:14 PM EDT

Wall Street has been brimming with optimism since President Donald Trump’s election, but Main Street’s optimism soared as well. Some say the new GOP health insurance bill may keep that going.CNBC reporter Kate Rogers said that “Main Street’s outlook post-election is still holding at historically high levels according to the National Federation of Independent Business.”

By Cal Thomas | March 14, 2017 | 2:01 PM EDT

Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to spend $1.4 billion of New York's resources to solve the persistent problem of poverty in central Brooklyn. If he wins legislative approval, Cuomo, a Democrat, intends to spend the money on affordable housing, job training, anti-violence programs, recreational space, even obesity. Some cynics suggest the proposal is targeted at boosting Cuomo's presidential prospects in 2020, but let's give him the benefit of the doubt and take his proposals seriously.