What everyone knew would happen as a result of Philadelphia's 1.5 cents-per-ounce soda tax began materializing on Wednesday, as Pepsi announced that it would lay off roughly 20 percent of its workforce there over the next several months. Coverage at both Philly.com and Associated Press allowed the city to engage in fantasy by claiming without meaningful challenge, or even clarification, that Pepsi in particular, but clearly other beverage makers by implication, should be using profits earned elsewhere to subsidize their Philly operations.


Andrew Ross Sorkin is considered a financial guru - a savant of all things business.  So how is he so very, very wrong about government teat specialist Elon Musk?: “Donald Trump: Please think about calling Elon Musk….Mr. Musk…(is) the real-life Tony Stark behind Tesla, the electric car company; SolarCity, the solar power provider; and SpaceX, the rocket company….”

Actually, Elon Musk isn’t the Tony Stark of anything.  And the only person behind Tesla and Solar City is a government bureaucrat - writing Musk yet another government check.


The day after Election Day, Rolling Stone publisher Jann Wenner met with President Barack Obama. The primary takeaway from that interview, published in late November, was, as Tim Graham at NewsBusters noted, how Obama partly blamed Hillary Clinton's election loss to Donald Trump on “Fox News in every bar and restaurant in big chunks of the country.” Additionally, Wenner, in what seemed at the time to be a crybaby throwaway line, suggested that "the news business and the newspaper industry, which is being destroyed by Facebook, needs a subsidy so we can maintain a free press." Unfortunately, New York Times President and CEO Mark Thompson shares both Wenner's lament and his suggested remedy. Thursday, establishment press pressure on Facebook brought about potentially ugly results.


Chuck Todd joined colleagues Mark Murray and Carrie Dann in a Wednesday article on NBC's First Read blog that decried President-Elect Donald Trump's "dangerous game of...picking winners and losers" in the economy. The trio oddly wondered, "Despite all of the corporate criticism of President Obama's first few years in office...has Trump intervened more in companies -- directly and individually -- in his month as president-elect more than Obama ever did?"


Vice President-Elect Mike Pence appeared on NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday to discuss Donald Trump’s fast approaching presidency. What he got, at one point, was moderator Chuck Todd grilling him on why Trump couldn’t save some 700 jobs Carrier still sent to Mexico. “You gave a tax break -- some people could say you gave a tax break to Carrier so that they would only send 700 jobs overseas,” he told Pence. 


President-Elect Donald Trump’s latest batch of cabinet nominations is drawing fire from liberal media elites with smears like “The wealthiest cabinet in history.” But the frustration over the nominees’ financial success is made humorous when it’s other super wealthy people throwing the fit, such as Al Sharpton during MSNBC’s PoliticsNation on Sunday. “I mean, how concerned… should Democrats be about the fact that all of these multi-corporate connected Wall Street millionaires guys,” he wondered. 


During an extended interview on CNN’s Anderson Cooper 360 Wednesday night, things got a little heated between Cooper and Senator Elizabeth Warren. The almost 25-minute-long interview grew tense when Cooper grilled Warren on how out of touch the Democratic Party is with Middle America. “When you look at that electoral map, I mean, there is blue on both coasts basically, and there is a lot of red in the entire rest of the country,” he noted before asking, “Do you feel like you are out of touch?”


On Thursday, Federal Reserve Chairman Janet Yellen suggested in a videoconference call, as translated into plain English by the Wall Street Journal, that "there could be benefits to allowing the central bank to buy stocks as a way to boost the economy in a downturn."


On June 8, Tim Graham at NewsBusters noted how Stephen Henderson at the Detroit Free Press had gone on an unhinged, murder-advocating rant against Michigan Republicans legislators for agreeing to a $617 million bailout of Detroit's public schools while continuing to support charter schools there. Reacting to the legislation, Henderson, in a June 4 column, called for charter school backers to be "sewed into a burlap sack with rabid animals and thrown into a lake to drown – if they aren’t eaten first." He reiterated his call for violence later in the same column: "A sack. An animal. A lake. No lover of actual democracy could weep at that outcome."

Now this disgraceful excuse for a journalist, despite a Pulitzer Prize supposedly saying otherwise, is outraged — outraged, I say — at the very idea that people are describing the Detroit schools' bailout as, well, a "bailout."


As his final term wanes, the New York Times is making excuses for the economy’s performance under President Obama, with the president himself guiding the way. Economics reporter Andrew Ross Sorkin’s interview of Obama for the cover of the Times Sunday magazine dug in in defense of Obama. The subhead: “Eight years after the financial crisis, unemployment is at 5 percent, deficits are down and G.D.P. is growing. Why do so many voters feel left behind? The president has a theory.” And Sorkin let him unfold the tale without journalistic pushback. And reporter Mark Landler gushed of Obama's self-defense: "Many historians agree."


During an interview with House Speaker Paul Ryan on Tuesday’s CBS This Morning, co-host Gayle King cued up a clip of Hamilton actor Lin-Manuel Miranda rapping his demand that Congress provide financial aid to Puerto Rico. On HBO’s Last Week Tonight on Sunday, left-wing host John Oliver capped off a lengthy monologue lobbying Congress to provide assistance to the island with the musical performance.


Hillary and Bernie love to go after “the banks.”  But the real scoundrel of the two on this subject?  Without doubt it’s Hillary and her banking scam.