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By Tom Blumer | August 29, 2012 | 10:41 AM EDT

In one of the more disgraceful reports emanating from the Associated Press this year, the self-decribed Essential Global News Network's Jack Gillum breathlessly told readers in a report tagged "exclusive" on Friday that Mitt Romney's presidential campaign is employing "secretive data-mining" to "sift through Americans' personal information" so they can "identify new and likely wealthy donors." This awful strategy targets Americans who reveal information about themselves "often unwittingly when they swipe their credit cards or log into Facebook."

On and on Gillum droned for over 1,000 words, claiming that "The effort by Romney appears to be the first example of a political campaign using such extensive data analysis." Y'know, Jack, you really need to look outside the AP bubble every once in a while, and maybe, I don't know, do a Google search or two before hitting "send" -- if for no other reason than to avoid the utter embarrassment which follows the jump.

By Matthew Sheffield | August 29, 2012 | 10:22 AM EDT

During live coverage of the Republican National Convention here in Tampa, Yahoo News Washington bureau chief David Chalian provided the perfect example of the pervasive anti-Republican bias Mitt Romney faces in his bid to unseat President Barack Obama.

In video broadcast Monday night by ABC and Yahoo over the Internet, Chalian can be heard claiming that GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney and his wife Ann are unconcerned about the fate of residents of the New Orleans area who are currently being hit by Hurricane Isaac.

By Clay Waters | August 29, 2012 | 10:08 AM EDT

Tuesday's lead New York Times editorial, which cynically used what is now Hurricane Isaac to make pro-Democratic political hay, also displayed the paper's galling hypocrisy on emergency natural disaster spending: "The Storm, Again – As high winds approach the gulf coast, Republicans advocate a less prepared government." Perhaps they were reading old Times editorials on flood control, which questioned the wisdom of building levees in flood plains.

Tropical Storm Isaac is more than just a logistical inconvenience for Republicans gathered in Tampa: it is a powerful reminder both of Republican incompetence in handling Hurricane Katrina seven years ago, and the party’s no-less-disastrous plans to further cut emergency-related spending.

By NB Staff | August 29, 2012 | 9:37 AM EDT

A book that's going to cause a lot of controversy is "No Easy Day," a first-hand account by one of the Navy SEALs who was part of the team that killed Osama bin Laden.

The Associated Press got an early copy of the book and reported that the author, Matt Bissonnette, says that the terrorist leader was killed when he looked out the window and was already dead when they entered the compound bin Laden was living in at the time. This is in direct contradiction to Obama Administration accounts of his death.

By Mark Finkelstein | August 29, 2012 | 9:15 AM EDT

TAMPA, Florida | To Republicans in the RNC convention hall last night, and surely to the majority of Americans watching at home regardless of their politics, Ann Romney came across as a warm, kind and caring woman. 

But the editors of the New York Times occupy a very different universe. In a nasty piece of work this morning, editorial page editor Andrew Rosenthal painted an ugly picture of Ann Romney. Using the most violent of metaphors, Rosenthal saw a woman who, of all things, had "slipped a knife into President Obama."  More after the jump.

By Noel Sheppard | August 29, 2012 | 8:56 AM EDT

By now you've likely heard Ellen Barkin and Samuel L. Jackson's disgusting remarks about the hurricane pounding the Gulf Coast hopefully killing innocent members of the GOP.

On Tuesday, the Washington Post's Sally Quinn actually published a piece at her On Faith blog entited "Did God Plan Issac to Punish Republicans":

By Tom Blumer | August 29, 2012 | 8:55 AM EDT

The Associated Press's Anne D'Innocenzio is clearly mystified and possibly even upset that consumer confidence as reported by the Conference Board on Wednesday fell sharply to its lowest level since November of last year.

Get a load of the second paragraph's first sentence in the version D'Innocenzio posted late yesterday morning shortly after the report's release, followed by asinine assertions which in effect say that Americans don't understand that things are getting better -- and, as usual, it's all about Dear Leader's reelection (bolds are mine):

By Brad Wilmouth | August 29, 2012 | 8:13 AM EDT

During MSNBC's live coverage of the Republican National Convention, as Paul Ryan was being discussed, MSNBC political analyst Jonathan Alter -- formerly of Newsweek -- asserted that Congressman Ryan's budget proposals are "cruel." Alter:

By Brad Wilmouth | August 29, 2012 | 8:00 AM EDT

During MSNBC's live coverage of the Republican National Convention on Tuesday, MSNBC political analyst Howard Fineman -- formerly of Newsweek -- complained that Chris Christie's speech was "nasty, and it was mean in tone," as he asserted that the speech failed to explain why Mitt Romney should be elected President. Shortly after 11:00 p.m., Fineman observed:

By Matt Hadro | August 29, 2012 | 1:55 AM EDT

CNN keeps playing up the controversy that supposedly is the Republican Party's platform on abortion – even though it resembles the language from the 2004 and 2008 platforms.

"The platform has this really sledgehammer view that all abortions are going to be outlawed, even for rape or for incest, and even for health of the mother," said political analyst David Gergen during Tuesday night's coverage of the Republican Convention.

By Noel Sheppard | August 29, 2012 | 1:45 AM EDT

"I feel this country is going downhill because of people like Akin and Ryan and Romney. They’re trying to kill us and destroy us."

So said Current TV's Joy Behar to the Boston Herald's Megan Johnson Tuesday:

By Matt Hadro | August 29, 2012 | 1:28 AM EDT

CNN's Gloria Borger challenged former congressman Artur Davis' "incredible 180-degree shift" from the Democratic Party to GOP convention speaker, but the GOP's new addition had an answer ready and waiting on Tuesday night.

"Well, Gloria, I'll be honest with you, the easy thing would have been for me to frankly to do what you guys are doing and to be a pundit. The easy thing for me, and no offense for what you do, but the easy thing would be to do a 'plague on both your houses'," Davis retorted.

By Matthew Balan | August 29, 2012 | 12:28 AM EDT

Just like his counterparts at MSNBC on Tuesday night, Fox News Channel political analyst Juan Williams thought it fit to continue forwarding the left's main attack on Ann Romney - that she just can't relate the average American woman. Minutes after Mrs. Romney's RNC speech, Williams bluntly remarked that she "looked to me like a corporate wife...[T]he stories she told about struggles – ah, it's hard for me to believe. I mean, she's a very rich woman. And I know that, and America knows that." [audio available here; video below the jump]

When anchor Megyn Kelly asked the former NPR personality what he meant by this loaded term, Williams claimed that Mrs. Romney wasn't "speaking, I think, for the tremendous number of single women in this country or married women...she did not convince me that, you know what? I understand the struggles of American women in general."

By Matt Vespa | August 29, 2012 | 12:27 AM EDT

Update/Correction: MSNBC aired South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley's speech. Haley is Indian-American. | A funny thing happened on race-obsessed MSNBC tonight. The liberal network failed to give viewers coverage of the speakers who happen to be member of racial minorities.  As Francesca Chambers, Editor of Red Alert Politics, reported on August 28th:

When popular Tea Party candidate Ted Cruz, the GOP nominee for Senate, took the stage, MSNBC cut away from the Republican National Convention and the Hispanic Republican from Texas’ speech.

By Matt Hadro | August 29, 2012 | 12:20 AM EDT

Just before Ann Romney's speech at the GOP convention, ABC repeatedly branded Mitt Romney with unfavorable ratings from its latest poll, and emphasized his "likability problem." ABC brought up Romney's unfavorable image four times in five minutes.

"Mitt Romney has a real likability problem," announced reporter Cokie Roberts. George Stephanopoulos introduced the ABC News poll saying "It shows Mitt Romney's unfavorable rating is 51 percent. That is the highest of any nominee in modern times."