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By Tim Graham | | November 3, 2013 | 9:25 AM EST

Longtime Los Angeles Times political reporter Robert Shogan died this week at 83. The Times appreciated him with the GOP consultant Mike Murphy's  title "the Colombo of American political journalism."

The Washington Post obituary noted Shogan "leavened some of his books with accounts of newsroom irreverence that did not appear in the next day's paper." For example, this line about JFK:

By Tim Graham | | November 3, 2013 | 9:16 AM EST

The Hill newspaper reports “A slew of media organizations have petitioned the government to release ObamaCare data that the White House has refused to make public.”

ABC, CNN, MSNBC and others have filed Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) seeking information on the beleaguered healthcare.gov website. They asked for government documents revealing how many Americans have enrolled in the new healthcare exchanges.

By Tim Graham | | November 3, 2013 | 8:11 AM EST

Do movie critics ever watch the trailers of their movies? Do they think their readers can’t Google search for the trailers? On Friday, Washington Post film critic Ann Hornaday hailed a pro-abortionist propaganda film. "'After Tiller,' a lucid, even-tempered portrait of physicians who perform late-term abortions, exemplifies the crucial role documentaries have come to play in civic discourse, which is so often whipped into partisan fury and emotionalism.”

That's so dishonest it should earn four Pinocchios from Post fact checker Glenn Kessler. As anyone can see in the trailer, "After Tiller" has all the partisan fury and emotionalism you would expect from people who think the right to abort a baby is a righteous act. In their view, late-term abortionists are heroes and saints, and the pro-life activists are terrorists:

By Mark Finkelstein | | November 3, 2013 | 6:28 AM EST

MISSPEAK 1:  to speak (as a word) incorrectly 2:  to express oneself imperfectly or incorrectly [e.g., claims now that he misspoke himself]

In an editorial of today, the New York Times couldn't bring itself to say the simple truth: that President Obama lied when he repeatedly assured Americans that, under Obamacare, if they liked their healthcare insurance policies they would be able to keep them. The most the Times was able to admit was that [emphasis added throughout] "Mr. Obama clearly misspoke when he said that."  Misspoke.  Yes, of course.  As you see from the Merriam Webster definition above, the word does not imply any intent to deceive.  Indeed, as in the example Merriam Webster offers, to misspeak implies a lack of intent.  The editorial gets worse, as you'll see after the jump.

By Tom Blumer | | November 2, 2013 | 7:51 PM EDT

Charlie Crist will formally announce his Florida 2014 gubernatorial candidacy on Monday. He served as Republican Governor of the Sunshine State from 2007 to 2011. He is now running as a Democrat. In 2010, he fell from being a prohibitive front-runner in that year's U.S. Senate race to a virtual afterthought after Marco Rubio's ascendance.

In the course of a fawning writeup about Crist's candidacy, the Associated Press, in a story carried at the Politico, made the following historically questionable claim about Crist:

By Tom Blumer | | November 2, 2013 | 5:59 PM EDT

Maybe the folks running the HealthCare.gov call centers don't have an enemies list. Instead, based on the experience of Fox News's Jim Angle, it might be an enemies directory, with anyone they're aware of in the media and perhaps other organizations included therein.

That's what one almost has to think based on the experience Angle recounted on the air and relayed via Twitter Friday (HT Twitchy; individual Angle tweets are here, here, and here):

By Noel Sheppard | | November 2, 2013 | 4:00 PM EDT

It really is hysterical listening to liberal Hollywoodans talk about politics.

Take for example actor/director Rob Reiner - made famous by his role as Meathead in the legendary sitcom All in the Family - claiming on HBO's Real Time Friday ("Overtime" web segment) that Barack Obama politically "is right around where Reagan was" (video follows with transcript and commentary):

By Tom Blumer | | November 2, 2013 | 3:40 PM EDT

On Bill Maher's HBO show Friday night, Democratic National Committe Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz insisted that President Obama's promise to the American people made over 20 times during a span of over two years, namely "If you like your health care plan, you can keep your health care plan," was not a lie.

Maher, appeared to warm to the idea that it was a lie, but at crunch time decided that it was something, like Bush 41's "no new taxes" pledge, that "did not hold up to the realities of governing," representing "a moral complexity I'm okay with 'cause I'm not twelve." Far-far lefty Rob Reiner also felt it necessary to criticize Republicans "who are refusing to make this better." Maher, though he didn't seem to like it, finally concluded that Obama, who in his mind previously had an "almost sterling reputation for honesty," now faces the reality that "to a certain extent that ship (of his credibility) has sailed." Video and a partial transcript are after the jump (HTs to The Blaze and Mediaite, which in my view falsely portrayed Maher's degree of disagreement; bolds are mine):

By Noel Sheppard | | November 2, 2013 | 1:10 PM EDT

Not surprisingly, the liberal media on Friday focused on leaked details from Mark Halperin and John Heilemann's new book "Double Down" that involved Barack Obama, Bill and Hillary Clinton, Joe Biden, Mitt Romney, and Chris Christie.

Yet buried deep in Peter Hamby's review at the Washington Post was a paragraph claiming the campaign of former Utah governor Jon Huntsman was behind the 2011 smears of Herman Cain and Indiana governor Mitch Daniels' wife:

By Noel Sheppard | | November 2, 2013 | 11:53 AM EDT

This is really delicious.

The Memphis Daily News reported Friday that Health and Human Services secretary Kathleen Sebelius was in Memphis to discuss ObamaCare when out of the crowd came Tennessee state senator Brian Kelsey (R) to hand her a copy of "Web Sites for Dummies."

By Mark Finkelstein | | November 2, 2013 | 11:46 AM EDT

Of all the lame attempts to explain away President Obama's oft-repeated Obamacare lie that "if you like your plan, you can keep it," Melissa Harris-Perry might have come up with the most hilarious: President Obama figured people wouldn't like it!

Yes, that's what MHP actually asserted on her MSNBC show this morning, claiming the Obama administration figured people wouldn't like their plans, and would clamor for the ones offered under Obamacare.  Of course the argument still leaves Obama as having lied. Even if if a majority of people with private plans didn't like them, that would still leave millions being forced out of plans they did like. So Obama would still have lied, albeit on a smaller scale.  View the video after the jump.

By Tom Blumer | | November 2, 2013 | 8:58 AM EDT

As individual and small group health care policy cancellations pour in and HealthCare.gov continues to be a phenomenal embarrassment, Obamacare's apologists, when they're not promoting laughable conspiracy theories about Republican "sabotage," are desperate to find something good to say about it.

On Al Sharpton's MSNBC show Thursday night (HTs to Hot Air, The Blaze and National Review), MSNBC analyst Goldie Taylor tried this "logic": "Health care costs alone are the number one driver of financial distress in this country for families. The number one cause of divorce in this country for families is financial distress." Therefore, because Obamacare is providing affordable health care "for all families," it is saving marriages and keeping families together, and it is hypocritical for Republicans, as the self-described party of families, to oppose it. Too bad for Ms. Taylor that, as will be shown after the jump, Obamacare really discourages marriage while encouraging currently married couples to divorce and shack up — impacts which have been known and almost completely ignored by the establishment press since early 2010.

By Brent Bozell | | November 2, 2013 | 8:03 AM EDT

Feminism isn't just a brutal philosophy for millions of unborn children. It's brutal on the Internet. Take the website Jezebel.com, a reference to the prophetess in the Book of Revelation who was "teaching and beguiling my servants to practice immorality."

This summer, a Catholic priest in Gainesville, Virginia took to Facebook to help find an adoptive home for an unborn child with Down syndrome. It spurred a little press boomlet when hundreds of people called or e-mailed the church, volunteering to raise the child.

By Tom Johnson | | November 2, 2013 | 7:21 AM EDT

Daily Kos founder and publisher Markos Moulitsas blogged twice this past Wednesday.

In the morning, Kos argued that as electoral defeats mount for increasingly frustrated right-wingers, they'll eventually have to choose between violent fantasies and actual violence (emphasis added):

By Matthew Sheffield | | November 2, 2013 | 7:00 AM EDT

Over the years, we’ve written a lot about long, slow ratings collapse of broadcast news. But ABC, CBS, and NBC aren’t the only ones experiencing this decline. As reported by David Zurawik of the Baltimore Sun, the ratings for PBS NewsHour show are almost in a freefall, even compared to their commercial competitors.

By its own count, NewsHour had 2.5 million viewers in 2005. This year the show is at 1.3 million. That’s an astonishing drop, nearly 50 percent, unmatched by any of the commercial broadcast evening news shows.