Latest Posts

By Brad Wilmouth | January 31, 2016 | 11:48 PM EST

On Friday's Real Time with Bill Maher, GOP presidential candidates Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz were both on the receiving end of HBO comedian Bill Maher's latest anti-conservative vitriol as he called Cruz a "creep" and a "practiced liar" while comparing Rubio's religious beliefs to those of the terrorist group ISIS.

By Tom Blumer | January 31, 2016 | 11:36 PM EST

A Sunday morning report by Associated Press political writer John O'Connor acts as if the the sordid history of fiscal irresponsibility in the State of Illinois is a new development brought on by a stubborn Republican governor in just the past seven months.

What hogwash. The state has had a large backlog of delinquent unpaid bills for a decade, if not longer. Five years ago, a Democratic governor and a Democrat-dominated legislature enacted steep income and property tax increases, promising that the additional taxes raised would enable the state to whittle down the unpaid backlog, solve the state's horrific unfunded pension liabilities problem, and generally right the fiscal ship. Naturally, they did no such thing. O'Connor also didn't find any of the tax or bill-delinquency history worth recounting in his 800-word report.

By Curtis Houck | January 31, 2016 | 10:54 PM EST

On the Iowa caucus eve edition of ABC’s World News Tonight, Republican campaign correspondent Tom Llamas had another lead story that focused heavily on frontrunner Donald Trump, but also featured a bizarre question to Republican Senator Ted Cruz (Tex.) as he was leaving an Iowa church about praying for his opponents like Donald Trump and fellow Senator Marco Rubio (Fl.).

By Curtis Houck | January 31, 2016 | 9:43 PM EST

Sunday's World News Tonight on ABC and the NBC Nightly News on the eve of the Iowa caucuses (with golf on CBS) previewsed the Democratic race. ABC parroted Hillary Clinton’s dismissal of e-mail scandal as a partisan hit job while NBC touted an “exclusive look” at a smartphone app that will be utilized by the Clinton campaign.

By Tom Blumer | January 31, 2016 | 9:04 PM EST

In trying to explain the current situation in Venezuela, the Washington Post's Matt O'Brien, in a post at the paper's Wonkblog, also inadvertently identified two reasons why authoritarian socialist tyrants like Huge Chavez and Nicolas Maduro are able to achieve and retain power.

The formula is simple: When you first gain power, garner international and media goodwill by giving stuff away, like housing and gasoline. That wlll earn you props from the likes of O'Brien and liberals everywhere who have come to believe that doing so "is a good idea in general." Meanwhile, you can work in the background to overturn whatever checks and balances your country's political system might have. If the populace finally figures out what you're really up to and rises up in opposition, they can't stop you — even if your party gets blown out in elections and takes over what has become, thanks to you, an impotent legislature.

By Jorge Bonilla | January 31, 2016 | 5:40 PM EST

In addition to amnesty, abortion on demand also gets a plug on Univision.

By Tim Graham | January 31, 2016 | 5:34 PM EST

Washington Post drama critic Peter Marks made a splash in their Sunday Arts section touting how America's musical-theatre sector is taking on the "nativist wave" coming from Donald Trump. From a revival of West Side Story to the hip-hop Founding Father musical Hamilton, actors are taking to the stage to underscore how American the newest Americans are:

By Curtis Houck | January 31, 2016 | 5:32 PM EST

On a special hour-long Sunday edition of CNN’s Inside Politics, panelist and National Journal writer Ron Fournier resumed his strong disdain for Republican frontrunner Donald Trump by lambasting him as having “bigoted” and “sexist rhetoric” for a man who makes “irresponsible comments” which exhibit “his shallowness on policy.”

By Curtis Houck | January 31, 2016 | 4:01 PM EST

Seeking to bring Hillary Clinton’s e-mail scandal into the panel segment of CNN’s State of the Union from Iowa on Sunday, conservative radio talk show host Hugh Hewitt expressed skepticism about the final Des Moines Register/Bloomberg poll for the Democratic side since it was taken before it was revealed that 22 e-mails from Clinton’s server were found to be top secret. 

By Tom Johnson | January 31, 2016 | 12:49 PM EST

Once upon a time, Martin Longman didn’t think Republicans were so bad, but that was before the Tea Party, before the Iraq war, before Fox News became a major force. The Washington Monthly blogger detailed his decades of disillusionment in a Tuesday post.

According to Longman, events which eroded his belief that Republicans were “decent people” included the “excesses of the Gingrich Revolution”; the “giant looting exercise” that GOPers allegedly executed during George W. Bush’s administration; and John McCain’s selection of Sarah Palin. He also argued that “Donald Trump actually is an ideological match for the modern conservative movement” given that movement conservatives are motivated less by philosophical principle than by “1) fear 2) hatred 3) greed and 4) a need to be led…Trump encapsulates those almost perfectly.”

By Tom Blumer | January 31, 2016 | 11:45 AM EST

Those in the press who have insisted that the "Ferguson effect" is an urban legend will have a hard time explaining why the two cities with the most potential to be affected by this supposedly mythical phenomenon now have murder rates among the top 20 in the entire world.

St. Louis, Missouri, next door to Ferguson, where a leftist-"inspired" campaign of "protests," civil disorder and rioting began in August 2014, came in at Number 15, with a rate of 59 murders per 100,000 residents. The city's 188 murders in 2015 were up from 159 in 2014 and 120 in 2013. Baltimore, Maryland, where Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake infamously admitted in April 2015, as public safety was deteriorating in her city, that "we also gave those who wished to destroy space to do that," was Number 19, with 344 murders (a rate of 55 per 100,000).

By Clay Waters | January 31, 2016 | 10:07 AM EST

New York Times media reporter Jonathan Mahler indulged in a celebration of a rival paper, the New York Daily News, and its recent hard turn to the left, as shown in the tabloid’s spurt of vulgar anti-conservative headlines – like the one calling NRA president Wayne LaPierre a terrorist – that have gone viral on social media, in “Drop Dead? Not The Newly Relevant Daily News." Mahler took us inside the liberal hive mind, buzzing with giddy self-congratulation over yet another puerile attack on Republicans, while dutifully reprinting the controversial covers that made liberals go giddy

By Bryan Ballas | January 31, 2016 | 7:20 AM EST

The indictment of the Center for Medical Progress has provoked rejoicing throughout the pro-choice press. However, in an article featured in Yahoo! Health, Claire Lampen of Mic.com found a great cause for lamentation. “Unfortunately, that reversal of fortunes can't undo the damage Daleiden and Merritt have already caused.”

According to Lampen, the real crime of the videos was that they allowed politicians to use them as “proof that Planned Parenthood is a murderous organization absent of ethics that must be shut down, because it appears to depict employees at a Houston clinic talking freely about the sale of fetal tissue for profit.” Appears to depict?

By Brent Baker | January 31, 2016 | 12:48 AM EST

From Monday’s Jimmy Kimmel Live, some embarrassing video from the NBC-owned TV station in Washington, DC during live coverage of the big snowstorm last weekend.

By Tom Blumer | January 30, 2016 | 11:56 PM EST

Observers can be excused for thinking that the politicial establishment is preparing the battlespace to convince us plebes that progress and economic growth are overrated. (That's sort of odd for people who call themselves "progressives," but making sense is not their strong suit.)

How interesting, for example, that Northwestern University economist Robert Gordon's book, The Rise and Fall of American Growth, was released on January 12, even though, as Bloomberg writer Noah Smith notes, Gordon "has been going around for several years making ... (the) case (that) ... the golden days of growth are over." Just in time for the arrival of a more visibly weak economy, Gordon's premise has been getting wildly disproportionate press attention. Smith goes further in his "Economic Growth Isn't Everything" column, referring to "the illusion of stagnation" (i.e., don't believe those weak stats, even if they go negative; everything is really fine), while reminding us of the supposedly marvelous things government has done and supposedly can still do for us.