Latest Posts

By Karen Townsend | | August 22, 2016 | 2:14 AM EDT

The star-crossed bipartisan relationship of Democrat staffer Laurel Healy and Republican chief-of-staff Gareth Ritter bombed like a Michael Moore documentary on last night's episode of CBS’s BrainDead.

By Alexa Moutevelis Coombs | | August 22, 2016 | 1:14 AM EDT

It's the eighth episode of the revamped left-wing version of Match Show on ABC and what do we have tonight but the second mention of Donald Trump this season.

By Tim Graham | | August 21, 2016 | 10:57 PM EDT

It was a nightmare for the BBC, as they described it: "An interview by BBC reporter Catrin Nye on Islamophobia has been interrupted by Islamophobia." A passer-by named Paul told Nye’s interviewee Ruqaiya Haris, a Muslim advocate and student: "There's no Sharia law here." Haris wasn’t going to take the interruption sitting down.

But it's a bit funny when the the taxpayer-funded BBC objects to an opposing point of view forcing its way into their tilted conversation.

By Scott Whitlock | | August 21, 2016 | 7:30 PM EDT

The Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza offered up a defensive piece on Thursday explaining “why President Obama isn’t stopping his vacation to visit the Louisiana flooding.” Obama has since reversed course and said he would visit, but the Cillizza dismissed the attacks against the President, condescendingly explaining, “Cue outrage.” The Post, however, is the same paper that called George W. Bush’s Hurricane Katrina flyover to be the second “worst” moment of George W. Bush’s presidency. 

By Brad Wilmouth | | August 21, 2016 | 5:15 PM EDT

Substituting for allegedly right-leaning columnist David Brooks on Friday's PBS NewsHour, Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin repeated a smear from the left against Breitbart News linking the conservative group and its former executive chairman, Steve Bannon, to "very anti-Semitic and anti-minority" sentiments as she responded negatively to Donald Trump's choice of Bannon as his new campaign CEO.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | | August 21, 2016 | 4:34 PM EDT

On Sunday’s Reliable Sources CNN’s Brian Stelter brought up a serious issue for journalists,Hillary Clinton's major lack of press conferences. He brought on NPR’s White House Correspondent Tamara Keith to discuss the importance of pressers. “So with a press conference, you can pull out more information, or you can -- or it will be more clear that the candidate simply isn't answering,” she explained. But Stelter was more interested with Clinton’s health conspiracies than say a real issue, such as the e-mail scandal.

By Clay Waters | | August 21, 2016 | 2:41 PM EDT

So long, democracy. Larry Wilmore's Comedy Central show got cancelled. That was the dramatic message from the far-left culture magazine Salon, with a headline ripe for ridicule: “Losing ‘The Nightly Show’ matters: Larry Wilmore’s satire was crucial for our democracy,” especially "in the middle of an election cycle where many segments of our society feel totally disenfranchised, if not outright persecuted." Lest you think the headline was clickbait, the piece by Sophia A. McClennen, a professor at Penn State, face-planted right out of the starting gate with the same magnificent exaggeration: "This week saw the end of one of the most significant satire news shows in our nation’s history. "

By Tom Johnson | | August 21, 2016 | 1:54 PM EDT

Once upon a time, the right had (some) reason to complain about media bias, acknowledges Talking Points Memo’s Josh Marshall, but these days, not so much. According to Marshall, when conservatives back in the day “went about creating their own counter-establishment,” what they built wasn’t a normal mirror image, but a funhouse-mirror image. For example, "Fox News [was] the supposed antidote to the 'liberal media'. Of course, Fox is 'conservative' in a way that the mid-century elite media simply never was. And with generations of ref-playing what had been a vaguely establishment liberal national press ceased almost entirely to be so."

By Tim Graham | | August 21, 2016 | 12:23 PM EDT

Sunday’s Washington Post Magazine has two cover stories, one for Bill Clinton and one (if you turn it upside down on the other side) for Melania Trump. As expected, Bill Clinton is going to get a gushier treatment. Post writer Neely Tucker is so tender to the president that he mangles a fact, and the copy editors (also tender hearts) allowed it. “Fact Checker” Glenn Kessler will not be assigned to this story.

Tucker wrote, “He allegedly cheated on his wife, repeatedly, even in the Oval Office, and with a young woman who wasn’t that much older than their daughter.”

By Nicholas Fondacaro | | August 21, 2016 | 12:05 PM EDT

ABC demonstrated a marvelous case of hypocrisy on Sunday when it comes to its transparency and perhaps conflicts of interest. On Good Morning America, anchor Dan Harris joked that correspondent Ron Claiborne "can barely hide his lack of objectivity when it comes to the Yankees” after a sports report. However, during ABC's This Week, moderator George Stephanopoulos failed to re-disclose his contributions to the Clinton Foundation while interviewing Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook about the organization.

By Melissa Mullins | | August 21, 2016 | 8:56 AM EDT

Washington Post sports columnist Dan Steinberg decided to insert politics in his recent column on the release of Washington Nationals relief pitcher Jonathan Papelbon. It was apparently a bad move for Papelbon to play a pro-Trump song in the clubhouse. It showed he didn't care about winning over the D.C. fan base. (Or the media.)

By Tom Blumer | | August 20, 2016 | 11:58 PM EDT

After 52 percent of voters in Great Britain cast their ballots in favor of leaving the European Union on June 23, financial commentators around the world, particularly in the U.S., predicted ugly economic tidings for the UK.

People who swallowed the gloom and doom whole must have been especially surprised early Friday morning when Bloomberg News published a piece headlined "Pro-Leave Economists Can Smell Vindication." Keeping hope for bad news alive, the caption underneath the piece's accompanying video reads, "Brexit Effect Missing So Far From U.K. Economic Data." Sorry, guys, it isn't just that bad news is missing. It's that the news out of the UK has been very good — "unexpectedly," of course.

By Tim Graham | | August 20, 2016 | 10:42 PM EDT

NPR ombudsman Elizabeth Jensen tenderly noted that the “public” broadcasters were about to look a little less open to the public. NPR.org is is dumping any online commentaries on their stories. This could be seen as lessening the chance a conservative can actually protest their leftist content. All existing comments on the site will disappear, since they "actually live within Disqus, an outside commenting platform used by NPR. So when the commenting software is removed, the archival comments go with it".

By Clay Waters | | August 20, 2016 | 6:57 PM EDT

New York Times liberal TV critic Mike Hale found every excuse for the cancellation of left-wing comic Larry Wilmore’s Comedy Central show save the obvious one. The headline flattered the failed TV host: “A Characteristically Low-Key Farewell for a Cerebral Host.” One would have to read all the way through, and very carefully, to get the vague hint that "The Nightly Show With Larry Wilmore" just may have been too unremittingly left-wing and humorless to succeed with the public.

 

By Tom Blumer | | August 20, 2016 | 6:43 PM EDT

In a CNN interview on Friday, former three-term U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu, a Democrat, thanked Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump for visiting the flood-ravaged Bayou State. Then, addressing the absence to that point of President Barack Obama and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, she said, "I hope Secretary Clinton will make her way down. I hope President Obama will make a visit" — which is as close as a fellow Democrat can possibly get to saying what's really on their mind, which is "Where in the heck are you guys?"

Those who have noticed it have decribed Landrieu's gratitude to Trump combined with her de facto callout of Obama and Clinton a "rare moment." It should surprise no one, though such behavior continues to deeply disappoint, that based on relevant searches neither Landrieu's statements nor any allusion to them have appeared at the two main national sites of the Associated Press or at the New York Times.