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New York Times columnist Ross Douthat, one of now two slightly right-leaning voices on the paper’s resolutely smugly liberal opinion page, penned “Notes on a Politcal Shooting” Sunday on the assassination attempt on House Republican Steve Scalise by a Bernie Sanders supporter. In his own diplomatic way -- his gentle tone a protective necessity to avoid riling the liberal comment section and Twitter mobs with his vile right-wingery -- Douthat got in some jabs at the liberal media. He also, sub rosa, chided the fake facts that appeared on the paper’s own editorial page regarding the shooting of Arizona Democrat Gabby Giffords. 


Steve Scalise suffered a physical assault on June 14 as a result of being shot by a liberal Bernie Sanders supporter. However, few know that three years ago Scalise politely endured a verbal assault by enraged Hollywood liberals in the entertainment business. It was an example of the increasing rejection of civil discourse by the left leading ultimately to the recent baseball field violence we saw a few days ago.

A June 16 Hollywood Reporter article by Paul Bond reveals the incident at the Los Angeles home of pollster Frank Luntz who held a soiree in the hopes of bringing together conservative congressmen and members of the entertainment industry. It did not go well as you can see in the article's title, Steve Scalise Once Tried to Woo Hollywood — the Results Weren't Pretty.


Washington Free Beacon editor Matthew Continetti on Friday called out The Washington Post for confirming there is a D.C. swamp. Jamie Gorelick, who was deputy attorney general for President Clinton, apparently made a "very bad boo-boo" by deciding to represent the president's daughter Ivanka and son-in-law Jared Kushner. Now her liberal friends have cast Gorelick out and created a "no Jamies Club."


In his weekly visit with Fox Business’s Stuart Varney Friday, Fox Sports 1 commentator Jason Whitlock complained about cowardly left-wingers in sports wanting to overthrow timeless American values and eliminate people they disagree with.


Appearing as a guest on Friday's All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC, former New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson slammed the Donald Trump administration's accomplishments so far as a "debacle" and declared that the Republican budget has "savagely" taken money from poverty programs and education. Abramson: "I think both of the scenarios, Chris, that you just laid out equal debacle because, you know, he has done quite a bit, but I think what he's done has been, you know, altogether damaging both to the country and internationally. ... A budget that has savagely taken money from housing programs from the poor, federal money for the schools."

 


Remember when First Lady Michelle Obama was off-limits to political satirists? Comedians know not to cross certain lines with their jokes. Take the First Family. It’s all well and good to mock the president, but the First Spouse is a different matter. That’s how it was for eight years when First Lady Michelle Obama lived in the White House.


As the Media Research Center's Brent Bozell noted Thursday morning, a Wednesday evening New York Times editorial which made it into Thursday's print edition outrageously perpetuated "a long-debunked leftist conspiracy theory about Gov. Sarah Palin inciting the (2011 Gabby) Giffords shooting," even though the paper's "own news reporters declared just yesterday that there was no evidence linking Palin to." The Times issued corrections which would have led its readers to believe that all mention of the 2011 Palin-targeting myth had been excised. That's not what happened.


As the Reverend William Barber appeared as a guest on Saturday's AM Joy on MSNBC to give his religion-based views on current events, host Joy Reid at one point seemed to worry about not being able to talk more about Republican Rep. Steve Scalise's conservative views and his history on "race," as she recalled the discredited story that the congressman spoke to a white nationalist event 15 years ago.


Conservatives who were angry when ABC cancelled one of the few conservative shows on TV may have some hope. The Hollywood Reporter on Thursday broke the news: “The Viacom-owned network is in preliminary talks to revive canceled Tim Allen comedy Last Man Standing.” 


Here's why people hate the liberal tilt of public broadcasting. Both PBS and NPR buried the Scalise shooting in their "week in review" segments. When the PBS NewsHour arrived there, anchor Judy Woodruff couldn't even mention the shooter was a Bernie Sanders campaign volunteer, couldn't mention his favorite TV shows, and couldn't ponder if anyone on the Left could have provoked him with their outrageous statements. Instead, liberal analyst Mark Shields blamed it on Newt Gingrich, and his "clone" Donald Trump: 


Here was a small item on the Washington Post’s blindness to the humanity of the unborn child. Last Sunday’s Washington Post Magazine carried an interview for their “Just Asking” feature with Wayne Pacelle, president of the Humane Society. Rachel Manteuffel didn’t go easy, pressing Pacelle about meeting with quarterback Michael Vick after he served time for abusing dogs in fatal dogfights. But she also asked him about compassion for….insects. Not unborn babies. Insects.


The radical leftist fanaticism of the Steve Scalise shooter has been an integral part of the news coverage, as it should be.  James Hodgkinson’s ties to the Bernie Sanders campaign have been reported (if sometimes buried) by most news outlets, and the pundits are virtually universal in their belief that the socialist senator should not be held responsible. 

These journalists were about a quarter of a century late to the dance. Theirs has been a decades-long exercise in hypocrisy. If an act of violence could be blamed on a Republican, or even better on a conservative, the press would do it, even if they needed to play a Kevin Bacon six-degrees-of-separation game. 


With Colin Kaepernick confined to the NFL's desert of unsigned free agents, Michael Bennett has clearly assumed the mantle as the league's most controversial player. Alleging this week that the NFL is too white, he is now writing his way to controversy, too. ESPN writer Sheil Kapadia revealed that Bennett is releasing a book, "Things that Make White People Uncomfortable," late this year.


In this poisonous political climate in America, and in the aftermath of a hateful Democrat's shooting of Republican congressmen, Washington Post sports columnist Sally Jenkins is urging the NBA champion Golden State Warriors to attend a White House celebration and set a civil tone for the nation. She recommends the Warriors show the nation that when we disagree with someone, we shake rather than shoot.


The View is a show that has, for much of its history, profited off of manufactured outrage. Friday’s broadcast took a similar turn, when they discussed the multifarious “sexism” embedded in liberal favorite Senator Kamala Harris getting “interrupted” by her fellow Senators. Other supposed examples: Reminding her not to interrupt Attorney General Jeff Sessions who was attempting to answer her question, and being called “hysterical” by a Trump surrogate.