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By Jorge Bonilla | November 29, 2015 | 11:13 AM EST

When Univision News President Isaac Lee held his infamous talk at UT Austin earlier this year, he reiterated the network’s commitment to covering only one side of certain issues by smearing ideological opponents via Nazi comparisons. Lee’s godwinning was once again evident this past week, in Univision’s regurgitation of the AP’s climate propaganda, proof positive that Univision is systematically committed to a left-wing agenda that goes far beyond immigration.

By Tim Graham | November 29, 2015 | 7:59 AM EST

Secular fundamentalists on the Left scowl when Fox News hosts like Bill O’Reilly suggest Christmas isn’t really a religious occasion when public schools host Christmas concerts. Certainly, Christians shouldn’t proclaim Christmas is anything but the celebration of God the Son arriving on Earth in the humblest way.

Katy Perry's new Christmas song -- which doubles as a commercial for the reasonably priced teen fashions at H&M merely has cartwheeling elves, a shirtless Santa, and a lyric about you...basically worshipping you.

By Mark Finkelstein | November 29, 2015 | 7:46 AM EST

It was one of those stunning live-TV moments revealing the seamier side of TV news.  Pat Brown is a criminal profiler who has taken a principled stand on media appearances about mass murderers. She will not discuss individual criminals, their motives, etc., believing that to do so only increases the number of mass murders. 

But when Brown appeared on CNN's New Day this morning, co-host Christi Paul immediately tried to engage her in a discussion of Colorado Springs shooter Robert Dear's possible "anti-government" views. Retorted Brown: "I'm a little disturbed because I made an agreement with CNN to appear this morning only under the condition that we do not talk about the particular shooter, use his name, or show his face." Undeterred, Paul tried to lure Brown into a discussion of the shooting investigation, but again Brown rebuffed it There the interview ended, but co-host Victor Blackwell came on to claim that the agreement had been honored because neither Dear's photo nor name had been used.  Didn't use Dear's name? Really? Have a look at the screencap, Mr. Blackwell. 

By Jack Coleman | November 28, 2015 | 9:49 PM EST

Ed Schultz should stick with his shtick as perpetually irritated working-class hero rather than ridicule others for their alleged ignorance of American history while at the same time displaying his flimsy grasp of it.

Since ending his radio show last year and getting shown the door at MSNBC in July, Schultz has taken to venting in a daily podcast he calls "Ed Schultz News and Commentary" that is accessible through YouTube and his website.

By Jeffrey Lord | November 28, 2015 | 9:40 PM EST

The brazenness of the double standard is increasingly stunning.

This time around? The dustup began as an offshoot of Donald Trump’s allegation that Muslims in Jersey City cheered as the towers fell on 9/11.

By Tim Graham | November 28, 2015 | 7:27 PM EST

Washington Post political reporter Ben Terris is a fresh-faced writer who just graduated from Brandeis in 2008. So surely he enjoyed writing a story for the front of the Style section on Thanksgiving with the snarky theme "Marco Rubio is just the guy to win the youth vote. Or so the old folks think. "

This is an interesting wisecrack, considering the same thing could be said about the old folks at newspapers trying to capture readership among millennials. Check out those fossils trying to appeal to the youth who speak in Tweets!

By Tom Blumer | November 28, 2015 | 6:46 PM EST

The truth about this year's Thanksgiving and Black Friday store and online sales is out there. It's just that Christopher Rugaber at the Associated Press, aka the Administration's Press, wasn't interested in clearly revealing all of it.

Instead, the AP economics writer told readers about the dollar amount of this year's and last year's Thursday and Friday store sales, but failed to quantify the increase in online sales. People who don't follow the economy closely likely don't know that an increase in online sales is quite unlikely to offset a decrease in brick-and-mortar store sales. The way Rugaber wrote up his piece ensured that news of the economy's continued malaise will remain elusive for low-information news consumers and, ultimately, low-information voters.

By Clay Waters | November 28, 2015 | 2:41 PM EST

Colorful New York Times political reporter Jason Horowitz let his left-wing ideological flags fly with three stories on consecutive days --a "venemous" Donld Trump rally, a cyptically hostile Carly Fiorina profile, and a chiding of Bernie Sanders for being insufficiently fiery on gay rights in the 1990s. Horowitz held Fiorina's childhood continent-hopping against her candidacy: "That family pedigree and worldly past is politically inconvenient in a campaign climate that prizes anti-establishment outsiders and a strong dose of nativism."

By Tim Graham | November 28, 2015 | 12:44 PM EST

On his PBS late-night talk show on Monday night. Charlie Rose brought on Gen. David Petraeus for an hour to discuss Iraq, Syria, and defeating ISIS. There was one obvious question: Would Rose ask the general about the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s e-mails? After all, Gen. Petraeus was sentenced to two years probation and fined $100,000 for possessing classified information at an unauthorized location.

The answer – this being liberal PBS – was “No.” The transcript ran 9,532 words without the word “e-mail.”

By Tim Graham | November 28, 2015 | 10:32 AM EST

AP television writer Lynn Elber has a celebrity update: “Rosie O'Donnell isn't mincing words when it comes to Donald Trump's presidential campaign.” That wouldn’t be a surprise, considering Trump mocked her in the first debate.

Said O'Donnell: "It's a nightmare." She didn't elaborate, adding only, "That's my quote."

By Tom Blumer | November 28, 2015 | 10:16 AM EST

On Wednesday, the Associated Press's Josh Boak added to the wire service's collection of weak "Getaway Day" business journalism by declaring that new-home sales "recovered in October."

No they didn't. The seasonally adjusted annual rate of 495,000 units reported by the Census Bureau was the fourth-lowest monthly level seen this year, even well below the 521,000 and 545,000 reported in the supposedly unprecedentedly awful winter months of January and February, respectively. Boak also claimed that "Americans recovered much of their appetite for owning new homes this year," even though current levels are at best about 70 percent of what one would expect in a pre-"new normal" healthy market.

By Mark Finkelstein | November 28, 2015 | 8:17 AM EST

When last month Ben Carson suggested that people confronted by a shooter should rush him en masse, ABC ran a story criticizing him, claiming that Carson "appears to be second-guessing" the victims of the mass shooting at Umpqua Community College in Oregon.

But on ABC's Good Morning America today, in the wake of the mass shooting in Colorado Springs, guess what an expert suggested? "If you can get other people to go with you, that is extremely important, in fact, that's one of the teaching tools today in schools is everyone at mass start throwing stuff at the shooter and go at him." So, did GMA host Dan Harris criticize the expert for second-guessing the victims?  Of course not. He's not a Republican running for office. Harris called the expert's suggestion "great advice."

By Brent Bozell and Tim Graham | November 28, 2015 | 7:57 AM EST

Some pro-abortion feminists recently denounced Hollywood for not producing TV and movie plots wherein the unborn baby is dispatched with zero remorse. It doesn't get more extremist than this. While Hollywood is without question virtually (but not entirely) unanimous in its pro-choice/pro-abortion sentiments, even when the abortion option is selected, rarely is it selected without personal angst for the simple reason that there is angst -- unless you're devoid of a soul and a conscience.

By Tom Johnson | November 27, 2015 | 11:56 PM EST

In the race for next year’s Republican presidential nomination, Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz have made media bias an issue, as did Newt Gingrich during the 2012 contest. Irony alert: Martin Longman believes that it was one of the media’s favorite GOPers, John McCain, who planted the seeds for such press-bashing when he chose his  running mate.

Longman contended in a Wednesday post that “something broke on the right when they were forced to spend September and October of 2008 pretending that it would be okay if Sarah Palin were elected vice-president. The only way to maintain that stance was to jettison all the normal standards we have for holding such a high office. But it also entailed simply insisting that the truth doesn’t matter…Seven years down the road, it’s gotten to the point that Republicans have realized that they can say anything they want and just blame media bias if anyone calls them on their lies.”

By Tom Blumer | November 27, 2015 | 11:24 PM EST

Twenty years of economic growth averaging less than 1 percent have failed to convince Japan's leaders — and apparently its citizens — that Keynesian-style government spending and handouts are not the answer to turning that long-suffering nation's economy around.

So the Shinzo Abe government, fresh from learning that the country is in yet another recession — its fifth since 2008 — is doing more of the same, while counting on press shills around the world like the Associated Press's Elaine Kurtenbach to be gentle in their coverage. Kurtenbach cooperated as expected early Friday morning (bolds and numbered tags are mine):