Trump Skips Networks at Press Conference With Japanese Prime Minister

Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe conducted a press conference at the White House on Friday in which all liberal three networks were not chosen to ask questions. ABC didn’t even bother to cover the event live. Only CBS and NBC broke in. Instead, Trump called on Daniel Halper of the New York Post and Blake Burman of Fox Business. Prime Minister Abe took questions from Japanese reporters. 

Halper, called on first, asked, “Thank you, Mr. President. I'm curious about yesterday's ruling in the 9th Circuit Court. Has it caused to you rethink your use of executive power and how will you respond, and will you sign new executive orders and perhaps a new travel ban?” 

Trump joked, “Well, your question was unrelated to what we’re here for today, but I’ll answer it.” 

Burman wondered: 

I'd like to pick up where Daniel left off, if you don't mind. You said earlier this week, and I'm quoting for you, you said "I've learned a lot in the last two weeks and terrorism is a far greater threat than the people of our country understand. But we're going to take care of it." Based off of what you have learned, and now knowing that your executive order is at least temporarily on hold, do you still feel as confident now as you have been at any point that you and the administration will be able to protect the homeland? 

On January 27, during a joint press conference with Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May, Trump also skipped the networks, instead calling on Reuters, BBC, Fox News and The British Sun.

A transcript of all the questions: 

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Donald Trump and Shinzo Abe press conference
2/10/17
1pm
        
1:22pm ET 

DANIEL HALPER (New York Post):  Thank you, Mr. President. I'm curious about yesterday's ruling in the 9th Circuit Court. Has it caused to you rethink your use of executive power and how will you respond, and will you sign new executive orders and perhaps a new travel ban? And Mr. Prime Minister, I'm curious about your reaction to America's withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific partnership, the TPP. Do you think that's weakened America's position in Asia and how do you think, how do you envision any sort of trade deal with the President working out? 

...

1:25

BLAKE BURMAN (Fox News): Thank you, Mr. President. I'd like to pick up where Daniel left off, if you don't mind. You said earlier this week, and I'm quoting for you, you said “I've learned a lot in the last two weeks and terrorism is a far greater threat than the people of our country understand. But we're going to take care of it.” Based off of what you have learned, and now knowing that your executive order is at least temporarily on hold, do you still feel as confident now as you have been at any point that you and the administration will be able to protect the homeland? And Mr. Prime Minister, thank you. I would just like to pick up again on what Daniel asked about TPP. Do you feel it's a mistake that the United States has at least signaled its intention to withdraw from the deal? Thank you both. 

1:27

SEIKA HARA (NHK, through translator): I have a question to Prime Minister Abe. Now, for the automotive market in Japan as well as foreign exchange of Japan, in the prior remarks, there have been discrepancy in your positions. So at the summit meeting, what were the discussions and were you able to narrow down the gap? And President Trump has said that he will make United States a great country. What is meant by the great country? And Prime Minister, what do you mean when you say United States is a great ally for you?     

1:33

MAKIKO TAKITA (Sankei, through translator): I have a question to President Trump. Obama administration under the re-balance to Asia have emphasized Asia is taking hard line stance in south China Sea as well as China Sea and North Korea has went on with the nuclear development. So some countries in Asia are concerned over commitment of United States in Asia. So against this backdrop, as was mentioned earlier, for the Trump administration, for the situations in Asia, how would you respond to the increasing difficulty here? And President, you have repeatedly stated about China taking on the currency, foreign exchange policies not good for the United States. Do you think that that eventually it will change in the future? 

Scott Whitlock
Scott Whitlock
Scott Whitlock is the associate editor for the Media Research Center's NewsBusters.org site.