ABC Is Nostalgic for the Days When Mothers Named Their Babies Barack

ABC’s Terry Moran has not lost his love for Barack Obama. The Nightline correspondent, who once compared the President to George Washington, on Tuesday got nostalgic for the early days of Obama, reminiscing, “I first met the then-Senator Obama in Cleveland all of the way back in 2006. Back then, they were naming babies after him in Iowa.”

The journalist lamented, “For the last time, Barack Obama heard that famous shouted announcement as he strode into the House chamber to give his State of the Union address.” Even though the President has a year left in office, Moran mourned the loss of the liberal politician: “America has come to know this couple, this historic First Family, and watched as their girls grew up and watched as their dad grew gray.”

On February 20, 2009, Moran ridiculously compared, “I like to say that, in some ways, Barack Obama is the first President since George Washington to be taking a step down into the Oval Office. I mean, from visionary leader of a giant movement, now he's got an executive position.”

On November 26, 2007, the journalist hyped Obama as a “fresh face” who represents “real change.”  

On November 6, 2006, Moran rhapsodized, “You can see it in the crowds. The thrill, the hope. How they surge toward him. You're looking at an American political phenomenon.” 

Co-anchor Byron Pitts on Tuesday introduced the segment with the same tone: “It's been a historic presidency for Mr. Obama. His first address to Congress to his final address on the State of the Union. Tonight, we're looking back at this president's evolution.”   

A transcript is below: 

ABC’s Nightline
01/13/15
1:11:15 a.m. [2 minutes and 16 seconds]

BYRON PITTS: It's been a historic presidency for Mr. Obama. His first address to Congress to his final address on the State of the Union. Tonight, we're looking back at this president's evolution. Here's ABC's Terry Moran. 

HOUSE SERGEANT AT ARMS: The President of the United States. 

TERRY MORAN: For the last time, Barack Obama heard that famous shouted announcement as he strode into the House chamber to give his State of the Union address. It's startling now to think back. I first met the then-Senator Obama in Cleveland all of the way back in 2006. Back then, they were naming babies after him in Iowa. 

THEN-SENATOR BARACK OBAMA [TO BABY]: How are you? 

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: He's so cute. 

OBAMA [in 2006] This is baby Barack right here. 

MORAN [in 2006]: And right now you're on a roll. Obamamania, they call it. The rock star.

OBAMA [in 2006]: Well, you know, this —

MORAN [in 2006]: You’re going to get a big cheer when you get home. 

OBAMA [in 2006]: This has been an interesting ride, two-and-a-half- years ago nobody knew my name.

MORAN: Then came 2008, a long shot first term senator challenging the Clinton machine. The campaign became a mass movement. A wave of hope. [TO OBAMA] [in 2008] What's the one thing in your life that you think prepares you best for that moment? 

OBAMA [in 2008]: In difficult or stressful moments, I don't get rattled. 

MORAN: And Obama himself turned out to be a highly polarizing president. Polls show he's never become either hugely popular like Ronald Reagan or Bill Clinton, or hugely unpopular like Jimmy Carter or George W. Bush. His favorability hovers under 50 percent. His presidency a time of turmoil and division and bitter, angry politics, the opposite of what he promised and hoped when he burst on to the scene with a speech that ignited the 2004 Democratic Convention. 

OBAMA [in 2004]: We are one people, all of us pledging allegiance to the stars and stripes. All of us defending the United States of America. 

MORAN: After tonight, no more of these presidential moments are left to him. America has come to know this couple, this historic First Family, and watched as their girls grew up and watched as their dad grew gray. 

OBAMA: Thank you. God bless you. God bless the United States of America. 

MORAN: For Nightline, I'm Terry Moran.

Scott Whitlock
Scott Whitlock
Scott Whitlock is the associate editor for the Media Research Center's NewsBusters.org site.