Latest Posts

This past weekend a fan of President Trump took an old video of Trump participating in fake television wrestling, put CNN’s logo in place of the person Trump was pretending to punch and made a gif out of it. Trump then retweeted the gif, to the media’s dismay. Predictably, journalists took to Twitter to spin this silly photoshopped tweet as a violent threat against all journalists. CNN journalists took it the worst of course, but went overboard with the hyperbolic predictions of whatever significance a silly gif could have.

 

That journalistic organ the New York Times often shows deep ambivalence on free speech and free expression when done by opponents of speech-squelching leftists. According to two articles, to say the conservative movement is alternative or in any way  defenders of free speech -- or to have a point about liberal hypocrisy -- is nothing but “rhetorical appropriation” of the honorable positions of the left.


Liberals will believe anything. One of the directors of the latest documentary on former President Ronald Reagan admitted to an interviewer that “People are going to be talking about the funny parallels between our film and President Honey Boo Boo.” In a Vogue interview with directors Sierra Pettengill and Pacho Velez, the makers of the documentary The Reagan Show, talked about the parallels between the Reagan era and the current Trump era. Both of which are horrible, of course.


On Friday's Real Time on HBO, far-left columnist and gay activist Dan Savage -- known for making attacks on conservatives that are beyond inflammatory --  joined left-wing comedian Bill Maher in demonizing Republicans as the two agreed that Democrats should start "fighting dirty" and begin "cheating like Republicans."


The Washington Post is trying a new tactic to mock President Trump's tweets: they assembled a "Washington Post Kids Chorus" of grade-school kids to sing (or rap) actual Trump tweets.

They posted the video on Friday, and Jonathan Easley at The Hill tweeted: "WaPo getting kids to mockingly sing Trump's tweets seems needlessly antagonistic and a dumb move right now." 


If there were two things President Trump knew how to do well, it’s tweet and get under the skin of the folks at CNN. Well, he did both on Sunday, when he tweeted a rather juvenile clip of a fight he had with WWE Chairman Vince McMahon a long time ago, with the CNN logo placed over McMahon’s face. As would be expected, CNN’s ridiculous figure Brian Stelter lost his mind on Reliable Sources later that morning as he and his stacked liberal panel decried the tweet as fascist, a grave danger, and a threat to the people that work at CNN.


What NBC’s Willie Geist spun as a rundown of the political echo chambers in America on Sunday Today, quickly devolved into a condemnation of the rise of conservative media. “Fake news is a favorite term, as you know, of President Trump. What you consider real and fake in many cases has become a question of where you're sitting and who you're listening to,” declared Geist at the start of the segment. He ignored the fact that the term was first used to describe stories about Hillary Clinton during the 2016 election.


If there's ever a "most pathetic correction ever" contest, the one posted by the Associated Press late Friday afternoon, conveniently ahead of what for many Americans will be a very long holiday weekend, has to be a serious contender. The wire service won't even acknowledge that it's a correction at its APnews.com site, instead calling it a "clarification." No one should be fooled. The AP's folly appears to have been triggered by an appropriately labeled correction posted at the New York Times Thursday evening which, as Kristine Marsh at NewsBusters noted Friday morning, "admitted (that) one of the media’s major talking points about the (government's) Russia investigation wasn’t actually true."


Joe Battenfeld at the Boston Herald reports that PBS superstation WGBH is acting like it's very high on the hog, paying lavish salaries and bonuses to executives (at least for taxpayer-subsidized TV) as the Trump administration has proposed zeroing out federal funding. 

The station's CEO Jonathan Abbott was given an $85,000 bonus in 2016, bringing his annual compensation package up to $624,930.


MRC's Dan Gainor noticed a fascinating story on America's historically low birth rate that utterly avoided one obvious factor in population decline: Abortion. Ariana Eunjung Cha's report was titlted "The U.S. fertility rate just hit a historic low. Why some demographers are freaking out."


A Kaepernick v. NFL lawsuit would be music to the ears of one media apologist for the renegade former quarterback -- and to entitlement champions everywhere. Jason Reid of ESPN's satellite blog, The Undefeated, suggests the unwanted Colin Kaepernick could potentially sue the National Football League because no team has signed him.


The new documentary From the Ashes is Michael Bloomberg’s latest volley in his personal war on coal. According to Variety in April 2017, Bloomberg’s environmental efforts included spending $100 million to move the U.S. away from coal — funding which included a new anti-coal feature length documentary: From the Ashes.


Funding America’s largest abortion provider will reduce abortions, according to its president. Never mind that, as Planned Parenthood receives more funding, its own abortion rate increases. On Wednesday, Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards appeared as a guest on Morning Joe to discuss the GOP healthcare bill that proposes to halt federal funding (Medicaid money) from going towards her organization.


On Saturday's AM Joy show on MSNBC, during a discussion of the current feud between President Donald Trump and MSNBC hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski, Democratic guest and equal rights attorney Tamara Holder degraded women in the White House as being "very, very weak-minded" and as having "smaller minds than his small hands."

 


It's a black comedy! It's a two-hour rant against capitalism! It's both ... and one of the year's worst films. Hate rarely makes for great comedy. Look no further than the late night landscape. Comedians spew monologues brimming with bile, leaving audiences with one simple question.