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By Tim Graham | November 28, 2015 | 12:44 PM EST

On his PBS late-night talk show on Monday night. Charlie Rose brought on Gen. David Petraeus for an hour to discuss Iraq, Syria, and defeating ISIS. There was one obvious question: Would Rose ask the general about the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s e-mails? After all, Gen. Petraeus was sentenced to two years probation and fined $100,000 for possessing classified information at an unauthorized location.

The answer – this being liberal PBS – was “No.” The transcript ran 9,532 words without the word “e-mail.”

By Tim Graham | November 28, 2015 | 10:32 AM EST

AP television writer Lynn Elber has a celebrity update: “Rosie O'Donnell isn't mincing words when it comes to Donald Trump's presidential campaign.” That wouldn’t be a surprise, considering Trump mocked her in the first debate.

Said O'Donnell: "It's a nightmare." She didn't elaborate, adding only, "That's my quote."

By Tom Blumer | November 28, 2015 | 10:16 AM EST

On Wednesday, the Associated Press's Josh Boak added to the wire service's collection of weak "Getaway Day" business journalism by declaring that new-home sales "recovered in October."

No they didn't. The seasonally adjusted annual rate of 495,000 units reported by the Census Bureau was the fourth-lowest monthly level seen this year, even well below the 521,000 and 545,000 reported in the supposedly unprecedentedly awful winter months of January and February, respectively. Boak also claimed that "Americans recovered much of their appetite for owning new homes this year," even though current levels are at best about 70 percent of what one would expect in a pre-"new normal" healthy market.

By Mark Finkelstein | November 28, 2015 | 8:17 AM EST

When last month Ben Carson suggested that people confronted by a shooter should rush him en masse, ABC ran a story criticizing him, claiming that Carson "appears to be second-guessing" the victims of the mass shooting at Umpqua Community College in Oregon.

But on ABC's Good Morning America today, in the wake of the mass shooting in Colorado Springs, guess what an expert suggested? "If you can get other people to go with you, that is extremely important, in fact, that's one of the teaching tools today in schools is everyone at mass start throwing stuff at the shooter and go at him." So, did GMA host Dan Harris criticize the expert for second-guessing the victims?  Of course not. He's not a Republican running for office. Harris called the expert's suggestion "great advice."

By Brent Bozell and Tim Graham | November 28, 2015 | 7:57 AM EST

Some pro-abortion feminists recently denounced Hollywood for not producing TV and movie plots wherein the unborn baby is dispatched with zero remorse. It doesn't get more extremist than this. While Hollywood is without question virtually (but not entirely) unanimous in its pro-choice/pro-abortion sentiments, even when the abortion option is selected, rarely is it selected without personal angst for the simple reason that there is angst -- unless you're devoid of a soul and a conscience.

By Tom Johnson | November 27, 2015 | 11:56 PM EST

In the race for next year’s Republican presidential nomination, Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz have made media bias an issue, as did Newt Gingrich during the 2012 contest. Irony alert: Martin Longman believes that it was one of the media’s favorite GOPers, John McCain, who planted the seeds for such press-bashing when he chose his  running mate.

Longman contended in a Wednesday post that “something broke on the right when they were forced to spend September and October of 2008 pretending that it would be okay if Sarah Palin were elected vice-president. The only way to maintain that stance was to jettison all the normal standards we have for holding such a high office. But it also entailed simply insisting that the truth doesn’t matter…Seven years down the road, it’s gotten to the point that Republicans have realized that they can say anything they want and just blame media bias if anyone calls them on their lies.”

By Tom Blumer | November 27, 2015 | 11:24 PM EST

Twenty years of economic growth averaging less than 1 percent have failed to convince Japan's leaders — and apparently its citizens — that Keynesian-style government spending and handouts are not the answer to turning that long-suffering nation's economy around.

So the Shinzo Abe government, fresh from learning that the country is in yet another recession — its fifth since 2008 — is doing more of the same, while counting on press shills around the world like the Associated Press's Elaine Kurtenbach to be gentle in their coverage. Kurtenbach cooperated as expected early Friday morning (bolds and numbered tags are mine):

By Tim Graham | November 27, 2015 | 11:14 PM EST

The Hill reports that the League of Conservation Voters hired actors Jeff Goldblum and Ed Begley, Jr. for a new video mocking opposition to President Obama’s plan to curtail emissions from power plants. You’d have to be a “selfish reptilian nincompoop” to oppose Obama.

The web video, produced in tandem with Will Ferrell’s Funny or Die website, depicts nine utility executives who are angry about the Environmental Protection Agency’s plans.

By Tom Blumer | November 27, 2015 | 7:00 PM EST

Ever since the White House changed hands almost seven years ago, press reports on the U.S. economy have annoyingly overaccentuated whatever positives reporters might find (or think they have found), while ignoring glaring negatives and omitting key items.

One example of such biased reporting came from the Associated Press's Martin Crutsinger on Wednesday. In covering the Census Bureau's October Durable Goods report, Crutsinger praised its one-month seasonally adjusted increases in new orders and shipments. While that news was welcome, the AP reporter ignored the ugly fact that October's actual (i.e., not seasonally adjusted) year-over-year figure was lower than October 2014, marking the seventh straight month of year-over-year declines. He also didn't address shipments, which have been flat compared to to the same month last year for the past four months, at all.

By Brad Wilmouth | November 27, 2015 | 4:46 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Friday's Legal View with Ashleigh Banfield on CNN to discuss Chicago protests that threaten to disrupt Black Friday shopping, liberal CNN political commentator Marc Lamont Hill suggested that the police had arrested the killer of a nine-year-old boy because it "diverts attention" from the recent release of the police shooting video of Laquan McDonald.

He also seemed to suggest that by shopping that blacks are "funding our own genocide" as he brushed off concerns about the protesters hurting the shopping season.

By Randy Hall | November 27, 2015 | 4:40 PM EST

During his weekly address on Thursday, president Barack Obama followed the motto “Never let a good crisis go to waste” by advancing his intention to bring 10,000 Syrian refugees to America and giving a brief historical lesson regarding the Pilgrims who came to this country almost 400 years ago.

“In 1620, a small band of Pilgrims came to this continent, refugees who had fled persecution and violence in their native land,” the Democratic occupant of the White House began. Even now, “we remember their part in the American story -- and we honor the men and women who helped them in their time of need.”

By Curtis Houck | November 27, 2015 | 4:36 PM EST

Joining host Chris Hayes on Wednesday’s pre-Thanksgiving edition of MSNBC’s All In, MSNBC political analyst and former Democratic Vermont Governor Howard Dean tried to trash the Republican Party as nothing but “an authoritarian party” “for a very long time” due to their policy positions on voter I.D. and abortion to name a few.

By Tim Graham | November 27, 2015 | 2:46 PM EST

The New York Times has now editorialized that Woodrow Wilson had a "toxic legacy" as an "unapologetic racist" that the Left on the Princeton campus was right to repudiate.

James Taranto at The Wall Street Journal had a little fun with the same newspaper's endorsement in 1912, calling Toxic Woodrow "a man of high equipment for the office, worthy of the full confidence of the people.”

a man of high equipment for the office, worthy of the full confidence of the people.”

By Tom Blumer | November 27, 2015 | 12:49 PM EST

Economic news on Wednesday's pre-Thanksgiving "Getaway Day" was largely dismal. The government's report on October's personal income and outlays headed up the disappointing news. While incomes increased nicely — at a rate which needs to be repeated about two dozen more times before it can be seen as genuinely impressive — spending only rose by 0.1 percent, while prior months were revised significantly downward.

Perhaps because they were all in a pre-holiday hurry, the headline writers at the Associated Press and AP economics writer Martin Crutsinger had fundamentally different takes on the news. Additionally, Crutsinger was apparently in such a rush that he didn't worry about the fact that his first two paragraphs' characterizations of the result disagreed. Finally, the AP reporter failed to note that total consumer spending in October was lower than what was originally reported in September after the previously mentioned downard revisions.

By Clay Waters | November 27, 2015 | 11:54 AM EST

Sports and politics are an uneasy mix, but ESPN's "The Truth" columnist Howard Bryant sees no conflict from his end-zone perch at the back of ESPN's biweekly magazine. His column for the December 7 edition tackled a mini-scandal about the Pentagon paying for patriotic displays at professional ball games: "Are You Ready for Some Patriotism?" Bryant went beyond genuine concerns over the sub-rosa marketing by the Pentagon to criticize any such respectful acts as pandering to police. Going full p.c., Bryant even argued that Veterans Day was a slap in the face to American Indians.