Latest Posts

By Tim Graham | | June 26, 2016 | 7:49 AM EDT

Washington Post media blogger Erik Wemple took up a NewsBusters post on Thursday: “NPR issues large correction about stay-at-home mom/gun-control activist.” Wemple wrote “NewsBusters, the very vigilant group that monitors the mainstream media for lefty bias, appears to have pushed NPR toward this step.”

But the really jaw-dropping part of the piece was Wemple’s interview with Shannon Watts, the allegedly inexperienced new politico NPR originally presented. Watts spat: “Here’s what happens: There’s a story about me and then immediately the gun lobby and the trolls, they try to pick apart who I am.”

By Clay Waters | | June 25, 2016 | 9:07 PM EDT

After Britain’s shocking vote to leave the European Union, the country's leftist elites (and the New York Times) shouted bootless cries of “xenophobia” to the rafters. Inside the paper lurked doom-saying, paranoia, and “xenophobia,” among other plagues to be visited upon Britain for its reckless leap from the crushing embrace of the European Union, an unelected, unaccountable bureaucracy staffed by wealthy elites.

By Tim Graham | | June 25, 2016 | 7:08 PM EDT

The bizarre inaccuracy of reporting on transgender activists was demonstrated by a recent New York Times blog post (for their “Women of the World” project) headlined “Transgender man opens up about breastfeeding his sons.”

He breast-feeds? "He’d undergone surgery to have his breasts removed, but his body still produced milk and he was able to breastfeed — or chestfeed, as he puts it — both of his children. He even started a blog called Milk Junkies and chronicled his experiences."

By Brad Wilmouth | | June 25, 2016 | 3:38 PM EDT

Concluding his Real Time show on Friday, HBO comedian Bill Maher called on President Barack Obama to go on an "apology tour" around the world to "drive Republicans nuts" and, presumably if Donald Trump loses the presidential election, to send a message that America is "back on our meds." On one of his most anti-America rants, Maher asserted that America "did some bad s***" in its history and has "acted like a nasty drunk" toward other countries. Maher listed Iraq among the list of countries the U.S. should apologize to as he called it "our eternal drunken booty call" which the U.S. invaded because "We were pretty badly hooked on oil at the time, and it made us do some crazy things."

By Scott Whitlock | | June 25, 2016 | 3:00 PM EDT

The Washington Post on Friday railed with politically correct anger at the new Civil War-era film Free State of Jones. According to a headline for the Ann Hornaday review, it’s the “wrong time for a white Knight’s tale.” The true story, starring Matthew McConaughey, centers around Netwon Knight, a Missippian who wages war against he Confederacy and the slave-holding class. 

By Jerome Woehrle | | June 25, 2016 | 2:00 PM EDT

As the late Illinois governor Adlai Stevenson observed, the “truth is often unpopular,” and people will frequently choose “agreeable fantasy” over “disagreeable fact.” This is particularly true of liberal reporters writing about intractable racial problems, like the persistently high-rates of crime and misbehavior among black and inner-city students.

By Jeffrey Lord | | June 25, 2016 | 12:07 PM EDT

The media missed the story. And its the same story - whether the topic is Donald Trump or the Brexit vote that now has the United Kingdom on the way out of the European Union. For that matter, this story popped up earlier in, of all places, Wisconsin, when Governor Scott Walker took on public employee unions and defeated them in a furious fight that even had him running in - and winning - a recall election forced by his opponents.

By Christian Toto | | June 25, 2016 | 11:30 AM EDT

The star of “Inside Amy Schumer” and last summer’s “Trainwreck” made sure of that. Since rising to “It Comic” status, Schumer has used her platform to speak out on a number of causes. She wants to be taken seriously. Even if she turns serious issues into yuk-yuk satires (that flunk the fact-check test).

By Brent Bozell and Tim Graham | | June 25, 2016 | 8:01 AM EDT

After weeks of indecision, ABC decided on May 12 it would renew the Catholic-bashing sitcom The Real O'Neals, loosely based on the childhood of vehement gay sex columnist Dan Savage. But then Noah Galvin, a 22-year-old gay actor playing the fictional version of Savage, gave an interview to New York magazine's Vulture blog that was so rude that The Hollywood Reporter said ABC was reconsidering its options, like reducing the number of episodes ordered for Season 2.

An executive producer who had spent four years getting the series on the air was "begging the network not to take action," said a source to The Hollywood Reporter. One show source added: "He caused a grade-A s--t show. ABC screamed at him all afternoon."

By Melissa Mullins | | June 25, 2016 | 6:58 AM EDT

The Washington Post is already working on crafting Obama’s presidential legacy story once he leaves office next January – and it isn’t just any legacy they are attributing to him – it’s an “unusual” legacy. Why?  Well, The Post certainly couldn’t use Obama Care which was shoved down the throats of Americans and far exceeded projected costs.  They couldn’t use the issue of Immigration that Obama so passionately ran on during his campaign – especially after it was just smacked down by the Supreme Court earlier this week.  No – Obama’s “unusual” legacy was being “a good dad,” something that had nothing to do with his presidency.

By Tom Johnson | | June 24, 2016 | 11:20 PM EDT

Osama bin Laden routinely referred to his main Western enemies as “crusaders.” Conservative-bashing author Neal Gabler, the longtime Fox News Watch panelist, adapted OBL’s analogy in a Thursday Salon piece that originally ran at BillMoyers.com. Gabler also griped that if most Americans don’t understand just how fanatical Republicans are, blame the media.

“For three decades,” Gabler commented, “the MSM have been collaborators with the GOP, pretending” that it’s “a normal party,” when it’s really “closer to a religious cult…It operates on dogma, sees compromise as a moral failing, [and] views enemies as pagans who must be vanquished…That isn’t politics; it’s a modern version of the medieval Crusades, and as the ancient Crusades did to Europe, it has inflicted untold damage on our country.”

By Matthew Balan | | June 24, 2016 | 10:50 PM EDT

On Friday's CBS Evening News, Steve Hartman hinted that the Bible Belt — and specifically, Alabama — was a dangerous place for homosexuals. Hartman pointed out that "a lot of people came out after Orlando" terrorist attack, but touted how "few took as big a risk as Jesse Johnson. Jesse's family lives in Jemison, Alabama, in the heart of the Bible Belt. Fly a flag here, and it better have just red, white, and blue."

By Clay Waters | | June 24, 2016 | 10:19 PM EDT

Immigration is the issue where the New York Times' liberal slant is most obvious, and Friday's edition did not fail to provide it. The Supreme Court effectively doomed President Obama’s executive actions in 2014 to unilaterally shield some five million illegal immigrants from deportation, and the New York Times' front-page “news analysis," “Lines Drawn for November,” immediately pounced on what it considers a golden political opportunity for Democrats in November.

By Tim Graham | | June 24, 2016 | 9:51 PM EDT

Washington Post reporter Robert Barnes reported Friday that a deadlocked Supreme Court handed Obama a huge defeat: “President Obama suffered the biggest legal defeat of his administration Thursday when a deadlocked Supreme Court failed to revive his stalled plan to shield millions of undocumented immigrants from deportation and give them the right to work legally in the United States.”

But this was the large headline: “Plan to shield illegal aliens suffers loss.”

By Brad Wilmouth | | June 24, 2016 | 7:45 PM EDT

Given the dominant media fervor in favor of more gun control, plus the favorable coverage the House Democratic sit-in stunt has received, it would certainly not be a shock to find a CNN anchor asking a question or two to a Democratic congressman pressing that the protest should have lasted longer or that they should go back to protesting again later. But when CNN's Brianna Keilar repeatedly pressed a Democratic congressman -- posing 10 questions in just six minutes along the lines that the protest did not last long enough, or that it should be resumed in the near future -- this was at the MSNBC level of liberal advocacy and bordering on a liberal media bias caricature.