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By Tom Blumer | November 27, 2015 | 11:24 PM EST

Twenty years of economic growth averaging less than 1 percent have failed to convince Japan's leaders — and apparently its citizens — that Keynesian-style government spending and handouts are not the answer to turning that long-suffering nation's economy around.

So the Shinzo Abe government, fresh from learning that the country is in yet another recession — its fifth since 2008 — is doing more of the same, while counting on press shills around the world like the Associated Press's Elaine Kurtenbach to be gentle in their coverage. Kurtenbach cooperated as expected early Friday morning (bolds and numbered tags are mine):

By Tim Graham | November 27, 2015 | 11:14 PM EST

The Hill reports that the League of Conservation Voters hired actors Jeff Goldblum and Ed Begley, Jr. for a new video mocking opposition to President Obama’s plan to curtail emissions from power plants. You’d have to be a “selfish reptilian nincompoop” to oppose Obama.

The web video, produced in tandem with Will Ferrell’s Funny or Die website, depicts nine utility executives who are angry about the Environmental Protection Agency’s plans.

By Tom Blumer | November 27, 2015 | 7:00 PM EST

Ever since the White House changed hands almost seven years ago, press reports on the U.S. economy have annoyingly overaccentuated whatever positives reporters might find (or think they have found), while ignoring glaring negatives and omitting key items.

One example of such biased reporting came from the Associated Press's Martin Crutsinger on Wednesday. In covering the Census Bureau's October Durable Goods report, Crutsinger praised its one-month seasonally adjusted increases in new orders and shipments. While that news was welcome, the AP reporter ignored the ugly fact that October's actual (i.e., not seasonally adjusted) year-over-year figure was lower than October 2014, marking the seventh straight month of year-over-year declines. He also didn't address shipments, which have been flat compared to to the same month last year for the past four months, at all.

By Brad Wilmouth | November 27, 2015 | 4:46 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Friday's Legal View with Ashleigh Banfield on CNN to discuss Chicago protests that threaten to disrupt Black Friday shopping, liberal CNN political commentator Marc Lamont Hill suggested that the police had arrested the killer of a nine-year-old boy to divert attention from the recent release of the police shooting of Laquan McDonald.

He also seemed to suggest that by shopping that blacks are "funding our own genocide" as he brushed off concerns about the protesters hurting the shopping season.

By Randy Hall | November 27, 2015 | 4:40 PM EST

During his weekly address on Thursday, president Barack Obama followed the motto “Never let a good crisis go to waste” by advancing his intention to bring 10,000 Syrian refugees to America and giving a brief historical lesson regarding the Pilgrims who came to this country almost 400 years ago.

“In 1620, a small band of Pilgrims came to this continent, refugees who had fled persecution and violence in their native land,” the Democratic occupant of the White House began. Even now, “we remember their part in the American story -- and we honor the men and women who helped them in their time of need.”

By Curtis Houck | November 27, 2015 | 4:36 PM EST

Joining host Chris Hayes on Wednesday’s pre-Thanksgiving edition of MSNBC’s All In, MSNBC political analyst and former Democratic Vermont Governor Howard Dean tried to trash the Republican Party as nothing but “an authoritarian party” “for a very long time” due to their policy positions on voter I.D. and abortion to name a few.

By Tim Graham | November 27, 2015 | 2:46 PM EST

The New York Times has now editorialized that Woodrow Wilson had a "toxic legacy" as an "unapologetic racist" that the Left on the Princeton campus was right to repudiate.

James Taranto at The Wall Street Journal had a little fun with the same newspaper's endorsement in 1912, calling Toxic Woodrow "a man of high equipment for the office, worthy of the full confidence of the people.”

a man of high equipment for the office, worthy of the full confidence of the people.”

By Tom Blumer | November 27, 2015 | 12:49 PM EST

Economic news on Wednesday's pre-Thanksgiving "Getaway Day" was largely dismal. The government's report on October's personal income and outlays headed up the disappointing news. While incomes increased nicely — at a rate which needs to be repeated about two dozen more times before it can be seen as genuinely impressive — spending only rose by 0.1 percent, while prior months were revised significantly downward.

Perhaps because they were all in a pre-holiday hurry, the headline writers at the Associated Press and AP economics writer Martin Crutsinger had fundamentally different takes on the news. Additionally, Crutsinger was apparently in such a rush that he didn't worry about the fact that his first two paragraphs' characterizations of the result disagreed. Finally, the AP reporter failed to note that total consumer spending in October was lower than what was originally reported in September after the previously mentioned downard revisions.

By Clay Waters | November 27, 2015 | 11:54 AM EST

Sports and politics are an uneasy mix, but ESPN's "The Truth" columnist Howard Bryant sees no conflict from his end-zone perch at the back of ESPN's biweekly magazine. His column for the December 7 edition tackled a mini-scandal about the Pentagon paying for patriotic displays at professional ball games: "Are You Ready for Some Patriotism?" Bryant went beyond genuine concerns over the sub-rosa marketing by the Pentagon to criticize any such respectful acts as pandering to police. Going full p.c., Bryant even argued that Veterans Day was a slap in the face to American Indians.

By Tim Graham | November 27, 2015 | 10:46 AM EST

USA Today Supreme Court correspondent Richard Wolf reported another one of those sob-story pieces about how women seeking abortions will have to drive more than an hour to have their babies “terminated.”

The headline was “In Texas, Going the Distance for an Abortion.” The star of the article was “Veronica” in San Antonio, but she “didn’t want her last name used because of the personal nature of the procedure.” She called the state a "big bully" because it's making the violence of abortion harder to achieve.

By Tim Graham | November 27, 2015 | 8:42 AM EST

Comcast is now using the “public service announcement” to push its leftist LGBT agenda. NBC Universal made an ad starring “Caitlyn” Jenner and fellow transgender activist Chandi Moore to mark the “Transgender Day of Remembrance" to remember those who died due to "anti-transgender hatred and prejudice."

Jenner concluded with action items: “Listen to trans people’s stories. Hire a trans person in your company. Support a trans person at your school. Love your trans child. Let’s all take action to put an end to hate and violence.”

By Melissa Mullins | November 27, 2015 | 7:47 AM EST

Since Stephen Colbert took the reins from David Letterman at The Late Show on CBS, he’s been proving to be serving comedy and commentary for the blue half of America. Kyle Smith of the New York Post penned a piece titled “Colbert’s Late Show has become propaganda for Democrats.”

Smith blamed the host for his interviews: “The pattern is familiar: When a Democrat is the guest, Colbert is Barbara Walters. When a Republican is on, he turns into Tim Russert.”

By Tom Johnson | November 27, 2015 | 12:23 AM EST

If frontrunner Donald Trump or currently surging Ted Cruz gets the 2016 Republican presidential nod, it may have a strange sort of bipartisan effect, according to Tomasky, who in a Wednesday column asserted that GOP bigwigs “despise” both Cruz and Trump to the extent that they’d “actually prefer” presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton to win the general election.

“No one’s ever going to say that publicly,” acknowledged Tomasky. “But half a lifetime of covering these people has taught me a few things about how they think…Intra-party personal hatred is much more visceral than inter-party personal hatred. The prospect of someone they hate in their own party having more power than they have is like the bitterest, foulest bowl of hemlock these people can drink.”

By Bryan Ballas | November 26, 2015 | 11:51 PM EST

On November 13th, the Supreme Court announced that it would weigh the constitutionality of Texas’ HB2 law, which mandates increased safety regulations for abortion clinics, and, according to its challengers, places an “undue burden” on women’s reproductive health. A mere five days later, several media publications including, Slate, The Guardian, The Washington Post, and Reuters covered the results of a recently released study that claimed that anywhere between 100,000 and 240,000 women in Texas attempted self-induced abortions since the passage of the HB 2 law.

By Clay Waters | November 26, 2015 | 3:00 PM EST

It took two weeks after the mass slaughter by radical Islamists in Paris, but the New York Times finally finds itself comfortable with raising the false spectre of American "Islamophobia," with an enormous assist from the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the so-called civil-rights organization many consider a Muslim pressure group, and whose ties to Hamas have been documented in federal court and by Democratic Sen. Charles Schumer. Reporter Kirk Semple breezed past all that to repeatedly cite CAIR in Thursday's Metro story: "'I'm Frightened': After Attacks in Paris, New York Muslims Cope With a Backlash." The group was mentioned no less than four times in different contexts, making one wonder just where the Times' "Islamophobia" angle originated.