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Hours after it was announced that Sean Spicer had resigned as White House press secretary, Anthony Scaramucci was announced as the new Director of Communications. In an inaugural press conference, journalists made it all about themselves.  ABC’s Jon Karl demanded, “Let me ask you a variation of what I asked Sean Spicer on his first day. Is it your commitment to the best of your ability give accurate information and truth from that podium?” 


It started Monday as a simple suggestion by former NFL quarterback Michael Vick that free agent Colin Kaepernick might rehabilitate his image with the league by cutting his afro. Now it's erupted into a war of words between ESPN and Fox Sports 1's Jason Whitlock, who called his former employer the "PC, Safe Space Network."

 


In an interview earlier this week, an MSNBC host appeared more worried than even Planned Parenthood’s president over the push to defund the abortion giant. On Tuesday, Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards appeared on Lawrence O’Donnell’s MSNBC show, The Last Word, to discuss the GOP health care bill and its inability to win enough support in the Senate.


Calling into CNN’s Inside Politics after news broke Friday afternoon Sean Spicer would resign from the position of White House press secretary, senior White House correspondent Jim Acosta trumpeted the reality that Spicer “was raked over the coals publicly” on Saturday Night Live and in the media (especially by people like Acosta). 


Appearing on MSNBC’s 11 a.m. ET hour on Friday, Republican North Dakota Congressman Kevin Cramer called out the “unhealthy obsession” the media have with accusations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, sending co-hosts Ali Velshi and Stephanie Ruhle into full freak-out mode. The liberal anchors dismissed the notion as “nonsense.”


The Dow Jones Industrial Average set its 26th record high of the year on July 19, prompting Fox Business anchor Stuart Varney to check in on the “Trump rally” and how much it boosted American wealth.

The rally began after Donald Trump’s presidential victory brought optimism that he would pursue tax reform and other pro-growth economic policies.


Roughly two hours after White House press secretary Sean Spicer announced his resignation, Reuters disturbingly set up shop outside Spicer’s house and provided a livestream for viewers to follow along with. It doesn’t take a whole lot of decency to conclude that this is a disgusting and tasteless display by an organization who’s White House correspondent (Jeff Mason) is the president of the White House Correspondents Association (WHCA).


Tinfoil hats are rarely a good look -- even the chic designer kind Hollywood celebrities can afford. But here come TV stars Alyssa Milano and Misha Collins, barking conspiracy theories and joining the throng of actors who want to be activists. Amber Tamblyn, see what you started?


New poll findings reveal that the liberal media, applaud abortion “healthcare” as “moral,” are out of touch with nearly half of the United States. And so, while the media readily cite polls supporting their agenda, it’s doubtful they’ll report this one.


MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews wasn’t done on Thursday night with the ridiculous comparisons involving Donald Trump, ending the show by comparing the President to O.J. Simpson in that he wants all government attorneys “to serve as his personal Johnnie Cochrans and Special Counsels named specifically to investigate him.”


Sean Spicer resigned as White House Press Secretary on Friday. Journalists immediately jumped on this as an example of yet more turmoil and harped on Spicer’s “missteps.” But White House tumult is hardly new, even for Presidents who would go on to serve two terms. ABC should know, considering that the network admitted in 1993 that then-President Bill Clinton “shunted aside” top aide George Stephanopoulos in favor of “grown-up” David Gergen. Stephanopoulos would go on to eventually host Good Morning America on the network. 


On CNN Tonight Thursday, a panel discussion on O.J. Simpson’s parole verdict earlier that day veered into politics, after one guest related the treatment of Simpson to Black Lives Matter. CNN legal analyst Areva Martin compared the reactions to yesterday’s verdict as racial, insinuating that whites angry over it were treating Simpson more harshly than they would a white person who did “much worse” things. After this comment, she got into a back-and-forth argument with former Simpson legal advisor Alan Dershowitz over the criminal justice system and Black Lives Matter.

 

For at least one New York Times political reporter, the Trump presidency is literally a joke. Matt Flegenheimer’s Washington Memo was headlined “Like a ‘Soap Opera,’ Only Not as Fun.” The text box longed for better, non-Trump days: “If only it were all just the figment of the imagination.” He wrote: It’s Iran-contra with a spray tan, Lewinsky with a grande covfefe. Exploring the studio space, Flegenheimer sounded like an improv comedian: "It's 'The Godfather,' but this time there’s a silent son-in-law in charge of Middle East peace for some reason."


At roughly nine o’clock Eastern Time Fox News Channel’s Ed Henry broke in with breaking news from the Aspen Security Forum in Colorado. At the forum, CIA Director Mike Pompeo took to the stage slammed The New York Times for putting the life of an officer at risk. “We had a publication, you work for Bret, that published the name of an undercover officer at the Central Intelligence Agency. I find that unconscionable,” he angrily declared to the applause of the audience.


As a show that’s supposed to be highlighting the downfall of social structure as monsters reign around the city, Spike’s The Mist is…surprisingly dull. Maybe it’s because the series depends on me caring about paper-thin liberal stereotypes as they dryly whisper through their been-there, done-that TV problems and are momentarily distracted by fog and the occasional gratuitous death scene. When that doesn’t work? Throw in another cliché!