Tom Blumer

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Contributing Editor


Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer

On the left, there is obsessive talk of impeaching Donald Trump. Despite the fact that the press reports which supposedly form the foundation of such talk are almost always based on anonymous sources, and despite the fact that the Trump administration has successfully refuted most if not all of them, the obsession continues. On his Wednesday night show, after successfully swatting away pathetic pro-impeachment arguments made by guest Krystal Ball and her citations of weak-kneed Republicans who can't seem to resist bending with the Beltway wind, Tucker Carlson got fed up.


In a Tuesday post at the American Enterprise Institute's "AEI Ideas" blog, Marc Thiessen called out "The media hypocrisy over Trump’s intelligence leak." While acknowledging that the Trump-related leak, if true (very big if), would be "indeed a disaster" — though, as National Review's Andy McCarthy has noted, still within Trump's unreviewable authority" as President —Thiessen noted that the current hyperventilation is coming from "the same news outlets that regularly, and intentionally, published highly classified intelligence in recent years, based on leaks from the Obama administration."


Last week was a very bad week for the establishment press, and for the leftist politicians who can't resist repeating and relaying the media's questionable "news" its journalists have been reporting as if they are clearly established facts. But you wouldn't know it from the Associated Press, which, consistent with its practice during many previous weeks, directed all eleven of its "fact-checking" efforts to statements made by President Donald Trump or members of his administration.


On the heels of the dreadful performance this morning on New Day Curtis Houck at NewsBusters observed earlier today, CNN's Chris Cuomo, apparently convinced that President Donald Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey is the scandal of the century, actually went to Twitter and asked: "For the sake of argument, what did Obama do that compares to comey firing in your opinion?"


In an item likely targeted for mid-morning Saturday publication in the hope that few would notice it, the Associated Press's James MacPherson covered "SIGNS OF (an) OIL BOOMLET IN NORTH DAKOTA AFTER PIPELINE FINISHED." The "pipeline" in question is the Dakota Access Pipeline the hard-left so despises. Though it inexplicably took the AP reporter four paragraphs to identify the pipeline as the DAPL, the most remarkable aspect of the story was his specific identification of its vast economic benefits in the space of a mere three paragraphs.


In a Saturday op-ed in the Washington Post, Harvard constitutional law professor Laurence H. Tribe wrote that "The time has come for Congress to launch an impeachment investigation of President Trump for obstruction of justice." Tribe says it should happen now, because "To wait for the results of the multiple investigations underway is to risk tying our nation’s fate to the whims of an authoritarian leader." (Conviction first, trial later.) To make his case, Tribe distorted both past history and current reality, while the Post failed to disclose key matters about the professor's entanglement which readers deserve to know.


The Associated Press and reporter Julie Pace are among the last institutions and people on earth, respectively, with any credibility to harangue the public about the dangers of "a man willing to challenge - in dramatic fashion - the institutions created to hold the president accountable." But there they were on Wednesday morning, in the wake of President Donald Trump's decision to fire FBI Director James Comey, doing just that.


Time Magazine published a side piece by Michael Scherer and Zeke J. Miller accompanying its primary story on Miller's interview with the President. In "Donald Trump After Hours," the pair observed that "At the dessert course, he (Trump) gets two scoops of vanilla ice cream with his chocolate cream pie, instead of the single scoop for everyone else." Hard as it might be to believe, some unhinged members of the press have pounced on this sentence as proof of Trump's less than exemplary character.


Desperate to make a case that voter-ID laws kept "many" people who should be allowed to vote from casting ballots in Wisconsin in November, two reporters at the Associated Press claimed "it is not hard to find" examples of Badger State residents who were "turned away." Left unexplained is how reporters Christina A. Cassidy and Ivan Moreno apparently could only identify four people out of hundreds of thousands allegedly affected after six months of searching. Despite a headline claiming that those involved faced "insurmountable" barriers, each person cited could have successfully cast a ballot, but failed to do so because of inadequate follow-through.


Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announced on Tuesday that he will not run for reelection as the city's mayor because of mounting allegations that he sexually abused underage boys in the 1980s. Press coverage has either ignored Murray's Democratic Party affiliation or buried it in related stories' late paragraphs.

This outcome also exposes a double standard in the Evergreen State press, and should (but probably won't) lead management at these outlets, particularly at the Seattle Times, to question why they chose not to report multiple allegations against Murray which first surfaced almost a decade ago.


The Associated Press had a variety of howlers from Democrats and leftists it could have included in its May 8 (update on May 9) "fact check" roundup based on events of the past week. As those who have watched the wire service's conduct since the 2016 election campaign could have predicted, it included none, and instead solely went after the Trump administration and GOP politicians on nine different claims.


On Friday, the government reported that the economy added a seasonally adjusted 211,000 jobs, and that the unemployment rate dropped to a 10-year low of 4.4 percent. The day's press coverage had three noticeable highlights. The first was the headline at the Associated Press's coverage — "US JOBS DATA SHOW SOME SCARS FROM RECESSION FINALLY HEALING."


In a two-minute video posted at PJ Media on Sunday, MSNBC's Chris Matthews stated that he wants Donald Trump to succeed, and that he "used to think" that presidential preference polls were honest, but "they were wrong." This is pretty odd coming a guy who, as seen in several recent NewsBusters posts, has frequently compared the Trump family to the Romanovs, and who has seemed to encourage people at the IRS to leak Trump's prior-year tax returns, saying that doing so would be "a good leak."


On Thursday, an Investor's Business Daily editorial cited a long list of news outlets which have recently covered the calamitous events in Venezuela, but which, in IBD's words, "continue to obfuscate, if not totally ignore" the fact that the country's implosion can be laid at the feet of one simple cause: "Socialism." One particularly appalling example exemplifying the paper's complaint came Saturday morning from NBC News.


Democratic Party strategist Peter Daou is among the sorest of all the sore losers having a hard time handling Hillary Clinton's November electoral loss to Donald Trump. He has been ranting for weeks on Twitter about how sexism hurt Mrs. Clinton, how "THE PLAYING FIELD ... (was) TILTED AGAINST HER" (yes, the original was in all caps), and even that the media "helped Trump win." Friday, Daou took his act to Tucker Carlson's Fox News show, where, as would be expected, Carlson made valid points, while Daou had nothing but tired excuses and spin.


In a segment on media bias on his Wednesday evening Fox News show, there was an interesting juxtaposition between host Tucker Carlson's short opening flashback to a conversation with Reuters reporter and White House Correspondents Association President Jeff Mason at Reuters and the live conversation he had with Buzzfeed Editor Ben Smith. Smith incredibly insisted that "people don't get into the business of reporting ... because we are political activists."


Early Thursday morning, New York Magazine published an online item which claimed that "rape is a pre-existing condition" under the health care bill which has passed in the House. As Reason.com noted, "None of this is true. Like, not even a little bit." That appears not to be the point, though. The point of engaging in such irresponsibility appears to have been to get it out there so that at least some people who never learn about the "correction" end up believing the original false claims. In other words, it's shamelessly produced fake news.


The Associated Press's descent into an ever more reflexively anti-Donald Trump, anti-conservative outlet which disguises itself as a wire service continues. On Tuesday (apparently updated sometime on Wednesday, based on its current "Yesterday" label), the AP's Marcy Gordon used a shopworn argument that a Republican or conservative who generally supports reducing government regulations and red tape is a hypocrite if he or she ever supports, even tentatively, any form of stronger regulation.


ESPN's determination to dig its own grave continues to move at high speed. On Tuesday, SportsCenter 6 co-host Michael Smith intensely overreacted to the racist actions of a small contingent fans at a Major League Baseball game at Boston's Fenway Park, using what they did to tag every city in America as "racist."


On Thursday, Julia Seymour at NewsBusters noted that in his new, ridiculously hyped Netflix series, so-called "Science Guy" Bill Nye "preached gender fluidity as 'forward thinking.'" In what can hardly be a coincidence, Daniel Payne at the Federalist.com reports that "someone cut from a re-release of the episode" a 76-second segment from Nye's original 1996 program on "Probability" explaining how a child's sex is determined at conception.