Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer
October 7, 2016, 1:03 PM EDT

Apparently Kurtis Lee and Seema Mehta at the Los Angeles Times have access to a special Newspeak news media version of the dictionary which contains a definition of "misleading" differing from the real dictionary: "deceptive; tending to mislead" ("mislead" as a verb primarily means "to lead or guide wrongly; lead astray"). They're using their Newspeak definition to claim that a completely factual statement by Republican vice presidential nominee Mike Pence about U.S. plans to accept Syrian refugees, which they label an "accusation" in their headline, is, well, "misleading."

October 5, 2016, 4:30 PM EDT

On Sunday, I posted on the saga of Andrew Spieles, a member of the Young Democrats at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia who admitted to submitting fraudulent voter registrations for 19 dead people, and the national press's virtually complete disinterest in covering the story.

Spieles' activities, which have gained the attention of but not yet prosecution by law enforcement, represent child's play in comparison to the horrible findings reported Friday by the Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) and the Virginia Voter’s Alliance (VVA) after an investigation relating to only a small portion of the state's voter-registration rolls.

October 4, 2016, 4:09 PM EDT

At the Associated Press Monday afternoon, Jim Suhr reported on the dismissal of a "civil rights lawsuit that alleged police used excessive force against protesters in Ferguson (Missouri) after the 2014 police shooting death of Michael Brown." The plaintiffs sought over $40 million from police, police officials, St. Louis County and the city of Ferguson.

Predictably, the plaintiffs will appeal. While anyone reading only Suhr's account might believe that the "protesters" have some basis for a complaint, coverage of the case's dismissal at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch makes it clear that their chances of any success on appeal are (or at least in a sane world should be) very small, That's because the Post-Dispatch reported that two of the three plaintiffs Suhr described with only their side of the story were shown to be lying.

October 3, 2016, 9:29 PM EDT

The press is going to extraordinary lengths to minimize the visibility of Hillary Clinton's damaging and disparaging February remarks at a fundraiser about how Bernie Sanders' supporters "are living in their parents’ basement," and how half of them don't know what ('just like Scandinavia') means" — stereotyping digs which don't survive even the most rudimentary efforts at fact-checking.

October 2, 2016, 6:02 PM EDT

The left continues to insist that voter fraud is a myth, specifically that "voter fraud is very rare, voter impersonation is nearly non-existent," and that "most allegations of fraud turn out to be baseless."

Part of the support system for that insistence comes from the press, where reports of election fraud routinely get ignored or downplayed.

October 1, 2016, 8:27 PM EDT

In a seven-minute segment on Friday, Democrat Howard Dean did not apologize for his speculation during Monday night's presidential debate about Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump's use of cocaine. The specific tweet: "Notice Trump sniffing all the time. Coke user?"

October 1, 2016, 1:29 PM EDT

On Thursday, in a story which made the front page of Friday's print edition, Jonathan Martin at The New York Times reported that Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton is "effectively acknowledging how difficult they think it will be to defeat Donald J. Trump" in Ohio.

September 30, 2016, 10:17 PM EDT

On Thursday, Federal Reserve Chairman Janet Yellen suggested in a videoconference call, as translated into plain English by the Wall Street Journal, that "there could be benefits to allowing the central bank to buy stocks as a way to boost the economy in a downturn."

September 30, 2016, 5:13 PM EDT

Official crime data released by the FBI earlier this week reveal that nearly 11 percent more Americans were murdered in the U.S. in 2015 than in 2014.

Leon Neyfakh at Slate.com is only secondarily interested in what the just-released stats say about the direction of public safety in the nation. What's far more important to him is making sure his readers know that "the FBI’s numbers do not prove Donald Trump right," and that there are "defensible journalistic reasons for keeping that 10.8 percent murder spike out of our headlines." I suspect the author would deny it, but if it is in the headlines, people might take their media-provided blinders off and learn that the Republican presidential nominee really is right — and we can't have that.

September 29, 2016, 11:32 PM EDT

Wednesday evening, Seattle TV station KING 5 erroneously broke what it thought was troubling news about Arcan Cetin, who has been arrested and charged with the murder of five people at the Cascade Mall in Burlington, Washington last Friday. The station reported that Cetin is not a U.S. citizen, but is instead "considered a permanent resident or green card holder," and that despite this status, Cetin "registered to vote in 2014 and participated in three election cycles, including the May presidential primary." Thursday evening, KING 5 backed away from its claim that Cetin is not a citizen. That's embarrassing, but the specific news about Cetin is hardly the most important thing KING 5 revealed on Wednesday. The big reveal, which remains the case, but which has seldom if ever been reported so bluntly, is this: "(Washington State) elections officials say the state's elections system operates, more or less, under an honor system."

September 29, 2016, 2:36 PM EDT

The government reported today that the US economy grew at an annual rate of 1.4 percent in the second quarter. That's a slight increase from the 1.1 percent reported a month ago, but certainly nothing to get excited about, especially given that annualized growth during the past three quarters has been barely above 1 percent. To make the Obama economy look better than it really is, the Associated Press's Martin Crutsinger today found "new-found strength" in a category that is contracting, completely ignored how out-of-control healthcare spending is artificially pumping up with little growth there is, and — as he and most of the establishment press has been doing for the past 7-plus years of Dear Leader's presidency — told us, once again, that prosperity is just around the corner.

September 29, 2016, 11:02 AM EDT

In a narrow sense, the item discussed here really shouldn't be newsworthy, because it's based on history which has for all practical purposes long been settled. But now that it's being treated as news, let's look into the can of worms at least two media outlets have chosen to open, perhaps without fully grasping the consequences of their doing so.

Leada Gore, an AL.com reporter who says she's "been covering Alabama news for more than 20 years," reported Tuesday morning that Ed Henry, an Alabama lawmaker who is also the state's Donald Trump for President co-chair, tweeted a sharp response to accusations of sexism directed at Trump by Hillary Clinton in Monday night's debate, specifically: "It is ironic that Lying Hillary blast (sic) Trump as a sexist when she is married to Bill, who is likely a rapist." We're supposed to believe that this tweet is controversial or over the top. It is, of course, no such thing.

September 28, 2016, 5:42 PM EDT

During Monday night's presidential debate, former DNC chairman and 2004 presidential candidate Howard Dean tweeted: "Notice Trump sniffing all the time. Coke user?" Even the tabloid site TMZ described Dean's tweet as a "low blow." Unbowed, Dean doubled down at MSNBC on Tuesday, to the point where a clearly uncomfortable Kate Snow tried to maneuver him into backing away a bit. He wouldn't, which is fine with Chris Cillizza of the Washington Post, who told the network's Peter Alexander on Wednesday that "we should probably be talking more about" Dean’s speculation.

September 28, 2016, 3:43 PM EDT

At Monday night's presidential debate, Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton made a big deal of how Republican nominee Donald Trump supposedly treated Alicia Machado after the 1996 Miss Universe winner gained a significant amount of weight during the year she held the title. Mrs. Clinton alleged that Trump called her "Miss Piggy" and "Miss Housekeeping." Trump denies it, and I could find no news account from that time showing that he used either nickname publicly.

Especially since the Clinton campaign is now actively using Machado to promote Mrs. Clinton's candidacy, even including her "story" in commercials, it's fair game to consider far heftier matters relating to Machado's history. The, uh, weight of the evidence leads one to seriously question, as the media won't, Team Clinton's judgment in associating so closely with Ms. Machado.

September 27, 2016, 4:31 PM EDT

It's quite funny in retrospect to remember how the press ridiculed the preoccupation of many people who questioned Barack Obama's eligibility to become and then to be President over the "birther" issue from late 2008 until early 2011.

Now look at who's obsessed. The press refuses to recognize that it has lost an issue it thought could use to bury the presidential candidacy of Donald Trump. They won't let it go, even though that train left the station on September 16. It would be hard to find a more obvious example of this obsession than was seen yesterday at MSNBC, when Chris Hayes refused to talk about anything else with Omarosa Manigault, the Trump campaign's director of African-American outreach.

September 27, 2016, 12:51 PM EDT

It's pretty hysterical how the left wants to set the rules for civil discourse over presidential candidates' health and habits.To them, it's really bad to talk, and virtually evil to speculate, about Hillary Clinton's demonstrations of frailty and other possible illnesses seen during the campaign, which are certainly not limited to her "medical situation" at the 9/11 anniversary ceremony two weeks ago. They think that responsible adults shouldn't engage in that ... with Democrats. But let Donald Trump show up at the first of the three presidential debates with some sniffling, and Howard Dean — former 12-year Governor of Vermont, 2004 Democratic Party presidential candidate, and former chairman of the Democratic National Committee — couldn't resist speculating that the GOP nominee was "on coke."

September 26, 2016, 7:36 PM EDT

Never let it be said that the folks at the Associated Press aren't on top of the news, making sure that readers as well as subscribers who use AP copy in their radio and TV broadcasts learn the most important developments of the day.

That's sarcasm, folks. Friday evening, in a story primarily about the FBI's grant of immunity to longtime Hillary Clinton assistant Cheryl Mills, the AP's Michael Biesecker blandly informed readers — in Paragraph 22 of 25 — that, in regards to her illegal and improperly secured private server, "The new FBI documents (released Friday) also reveal that Clinton occasionally exchanged messages with President Barack Obama, who used a pseudonymous email address." That's it. Nothing unusual here. Now move along.

September 26, 2016, 2:04 PM EDT

When will the highly left-politicized "fact checking" site known as Politifact evaluate a statement about the unemployment rate among young blacks as "Mostly True"? When Bernie Sanders says it.

When will Politifact take a very similar statement and determine that it's "Mostly False"? When Donald Trump says it — even though, if judged consistently by Sanders' strange definition of "real unemployment rate," Trump was closer to the mark than was the Vermont senator.

September 25, 2016, 10:32 PM EDT

In a "Fact Check" published Wednesday afternoon, the Associated Press's Thomas Beaumont insisted that Donald Trump's September 16 statement that "Hillary Clinton and her campaign of 2008 started the birther controversy," namely that then-candidate Barack Obama was not born in the United States, "is as untrue as his original lie." Some readers who don't get past Paragraph 3 might even believe that Trump started it all. And this is a "fact check"?

Beaumont's bluster appears to be in response to center-right bloggers and pundits who correctly refuse to let Hillary Clinton campaign and her gatekeepers in the press get away with revising history and ignoring new corroborating facts. To believe Beaumont, one has to believe that longtime Clinton aide and confidant Sidney Blumenthal's rumor-shopping to various members of the press doesn't matter, because he "was not officially part of the (Hillary Clinton 2008) campaign staff." What rubbish. The facts show that he was much more important to Hillary Clinton than that.

September 24, 2016, 3:45 PM EDT

On Wednesday, in response to news that violent people the press insists on describing as "protesters" in Charlotte were stopping traffic on Interstate 277, University of Tennessee law professor and Instapundit founding blogger Glenn Reynolds retweeted a related story with three words of advice: "Run them down." As a result, Twitter, which continues to allow the existence of and continued postings to hashtags like #killwhites and #killallwhitepeople, and has routinely done nothing about direct personal threats tweeted predominantly by leftists, suspended Reynolds' Twitter account.