Matthew Balan

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Contributing Writer


Matthew Balan was a news analyst at Media Research Center from February 2007 until February 2017. Previously, he worked for the Heritage Foundation from 2003 until 2006, and for Human Life International in 2006. He is an alumnus of the University of Delaware.

Latest from Matthew Balan

Nicole Winfield unsurprisingly slanted toward left-wing LGBT groups in her Monday article about the mid-term report of the Catholic bishops' synod on the family currently underway at the Vatican. Winfield played up how "gay rights groups hailed a 'seismic shift' by the Catholic Church toward gays on Monday after bishops said homosexuals had gifts to offer the church," and front-loaded three straight quotes from members of two such groups, along with a sympathizer.


ABC, CBS, and NBC punted on covering the poignant "bucket list" created by Jenna and Dan Haley for their son, Shane, who developed in his mother's womb with a major genetic defect. Shane Haley was born on Thursday morning, and died just a few hours later. The Big Three networks ignored the story on their Thursday evening and Friday morning newscasts, despite the couple gaining hundreds of thousands of followers on Facebook, who followed the Haleys checking off the items on their list.


In a Thursday column for The Daily Beast, former CNN contributor Roland Martin attacked the supposed "cowardly bullies" at the National Rifle Association for opposing President Obama's surgeon general nominee. Martin's op-ed follows in the footsteps of MSNBC's Krystal Ball and NBC's Anne Thompson, who politicized the Ebola crisis nearly a week earlier when they bemoaned that due to "Senate dysfunction and NRA opposition, we don't have a surgeon general right now."


Piers Morgan's former employers at CNN finally responded on Thursday to the former host's recent targeting of Anderson Cooper. Politico's Dylan Byers reported that in an e-mail, network publicist Megan Rivers "accused Morgan of making unjustified attacks on his former colleague [Cooper] in order to find a new job." The former CNN host is now editor-at-large at the Daily Mail.


MSNBC's Joy Reid set aside nearly six minutes of air time on Wednesday's The Reid Report to letting homosexual activists Larry Kramer and Dan Savage boast about their longtime involvement in the far-left LGBT movement. Reid gave Kramer a platform to wax ecstatic about his founding of the radical group ACT-UP, as well as boost his play/movie The Normal Heart. Savage hyped his It Gets Better Project, and sang the praises of Kramer during the segment


Wednesday's CBS This Morning promoted an Oregon woman's planned suicide, to the point that all three anchors of the morning show acted like cheerleaders for the cancer patient. Charlie Rose lauded the "powerful" testimonial-style video from Brittany Maynard, the "29-year-old newlywed with stage IV brain cancer," as co-anchor Gayle King described her. The newscast aired 47 seconds of Maynard's ad without any soundbites from opponents of euthanasia.


Left-wing academic Marc Lamont Hill blasted atheists Bill Maher and Sam Harris on Monday's CNN Tonight for their blunt views about the Islamic faith: "When he [actor Sam Harris] says that Islam is the mother lode of bad ideas, that is horrific; it is offensive; and, as Ben [Affleck] said...quite frankly, it's racist." Hill contended that "Islam is not uniquely violent or primarily violent or any more prone to violence than any other religion."


Samuel Burke touted Amazon's new streaming TV series Transparent on Monday's CNN Newsroom as "groundbreaking," and underlined that it's "tackling a topic that TV has rarely touched." The main character in the series, "Moira," is an elderly father who begins to dress as a woman. Burke acclaimed that "this role of a 70-year-old trans-gender character might just give Netflix a run for its money."


NPR's Sylvia Poggioli promoted the cause of dissenters inside the Catholic Church on Sunday's Weekend Edition, as she covered the beginning of special meeting of bishops at the Vatican. She featured seven soundbites from four such dissenters (and didn't identify three of them as such), and none from orthodox Catholics.

The correspondent also played up the "vehement response" from five cardinals to "the Pope's favorite theologian" over his proposal to loosen the Church's discipline regarding divorced Catholics.


MSNBC anchor Krystal Ball and NBC correspondent Anne Thompson shamelessly politicized the Ebola crisis in a Thursday op-ed on MSNBC.com. Ball and Thompson bewailed how due to "Senate dysfunction and NRA opposition, we don't have a surgeon general right now....during a time when, we not only have Ebola arriving on our shores, but are also dealing with the mysterious Enterovirus, which is infecting and contributing to the deaths of children in the U.S."


On Monday, Dr. David Agus injected the media's regular hype about climate change into CBS This Morning's coverage of the outbreak of Enterovirus D68 in the U.S. and the Ebola crisis in Africa. The CBS medical contributor admitted that science didn't have any answers at this point, but that didn't stop him from wildly speculating: "We don't know exactly why there was a dramatic spread this year, but something is happening now. We have multiple viruses. And together with global climate change, things are changing in the virus world, and we have to pay attention."


Wednesday's CNN Tonight spotlighted the lawsuit of a homosexual woman, who mistakenly received sperm from an African-American man – instead of a "blond-haired, blue-eyed [man]...resembling my partner," as guest Jennifer Cramblett put it. Hosts Don Lemon and Alisyn Camerota gave Cramblett a platform to promote her case. Camerota underlined that the plaintiff "live[s] in eastern Ohio, in a town that you say is 98 percent white and racially insensitive." However, Lemon actually played a bit of hardball with Cramblett, over whether the racial make-up of her daughter really matters or not.


Brian Palmer revealed what many secularists feel about Christian missionaries in Africa in a Thursday piece on Slate, especially the role on the front lines of the ongoing fight against Ebola. Palmer acknowledged how "missionary doctors and nurses...have undertaken long-term commitments to address the health problems of poor Africans," but added that "for secular Americans...it may be difficult to shake a bit of discomfort with the situation....It's great that these people are doing God's work, but do they have to talk about Him so much?"


Lauren Tuck unleashed against superhero-themed T-shirts that are supposedly "displaying blatantly sexist messages" in a Wednesday post in Yahoo's Style section. Tuck cited a blogger who ranted against one such shirt at Walmart that features the slogan, "Training to be Batman's Wife." The writer not only targeted "chauvinistic apparel" involving DC Comics characters, but also two shirts related to Marvel Comics' "The Avengers" series.


On Tuesday's The Kelly File on Fox News Channel, Maureen Faulkner, the widow of murdered Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner, berated the graduating students at Goddard College in Vermont for honoring her husband's killer, Mumia Abu-Jamal, as their commencement speaker: "I am just absolutely outraged that they would have such a hate-filled murderer on as a commencement speaker...he murdered my husband with malice and pre-meditation. He is evil."


Fans of the zany Tom and Jerry cartoons from the golden age of animation might be in for a shock, as the classic shorts now carry a politically-correct warning on Amazon's streaming video service. On Tuesday, BBC correspondent Sean Coughlan reported that on Amazon Prime, the "Tom and Jerry: The Complete Second Volume is accompanied by the caution: 'Tom and Jerry shorts may depict some ethnic and racial prejudices that were once commonplace in American society. Such depictions were wrong then and are wrong today.'"


On Monday's Fox News's Hannity, Islamist cleric Anjem Choudary accused the Western media and Blackwater of framing ISIS for the atrocities that the terrorist group has freely admitted to. When host Sean Hannity raised the beheading of British aid worker David Haines, Choudary contended that "the information that we received...is very biased....I don't take my news from Fox News or the BBC. If you look at the people on the ground, I think you'll find that they have a completely different story. The Christians and Jews are living quite peacefully, in fact, in the Islamic State."


Open Obama supporter Gayle King made sure she got her liberal viewpoint across on Monday's CBS This Morning as she interviewed Rep. Paul Ryan. King spotlighted an excerpt from the congressman's new book: "You said, 'In order for the Republican Party to save the country' – some people don't think it needs saving, by the way – but you said the GOP has to change from within. What do you mean by that?"


MSNBC host Al Sharpton will be the keynote speaker at the Council on American-Islamic Relations's (CAIR) 20th anniversary banquet on Saturday. Sharpton, who is President Obama's "go-to man on race," and who claims to be helping the White House pick outgoing Attorney General Eric Holder's successor, will be a guest of honor of the group, which was listed as a co-conspirator in a criminal case against an Islamic charity that raised millions for Hamas.


Mere hours before President Obama announced Attorney General Eric Holder's resignation, Sharyl Attkisson reported on Thursday that U.S. District Court Judge John Bates ordered the Justice Department to "turn over a list of withheld Fast and Furious documents by Oct. 22 [2014]." CBS Evening News mentioned Fast and Furious in their coverage of the Holder announcement that evening, but NBC Nightly News failed to mention the scandal (ABC's World News didn't cover the resignation at all).