Ken Shepherd lives in New Carrollton, Md., with his wife, Laura, and children Mercy and Abraham. Ken graduated cum laude from the University of Maryland in 2001 with a Bachelors of Arts in Government & Politics and a citation in Public Leadership. 

Ken has worked full-time for the Media Research Center since May 2001 and prior to that was an MRC New Analysis Division intern from October 1998 to May 2001. 

In his spare time, Ken enjoys karaoke, tennis, reading, and discussing theology or politics.

Latest from Ken Shepherd
April 29, 2011, 6:17 PM EDT

The pastor who preached the Easter sermon that Barack Obama heard this past Sunday is not another Jeremiah Wright, Time's Amy Sullivan insists in an April 29 blog "Swampland" blog post entitled "Conservatives Go After Another Obama Pastor."

Sullivan was responding to the complaints of conservative talkers Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity, who highlighted some controversial remarks Smith made to a college audience last year:

April 29, 2011, 3:14 PM EDT

If a 64-year-old former U.S. president rode 100 kilometers in the desert with more than a dozen wounded military veterans to raise awareness of and money for veterans charities, would it make headlines?

You'd think it would, but it didn't.

On Monday, April 18, the George W. Bush Presidential Center announced that the former commander-in-chief would ride with "fourteen United States servicemen and women who were seriously wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan" in a 100-kilometer mountain bike ride on April 25-27 in the Big Bend National Park:

April 29, 2011, 12:21 PM EDT

"Thank God for Jimmy Carter. He takes on the tough ones."

That's how "On Faith" moderator Sally Quinn ended her April 26 post "Does God hate women?"

Quinn insisted that it was "a question that never occurred to me until I began to study religion" and that the 39th president of the United States had a role in her examining the topic:

April 28, 2011, 5:03 PM EDT

Last week I noted how the Washington Post published on page A5 a story about how Obama Treasury officials tried but failed to influence Standard & Poor's credit analysts from downgrading the U.S. government's credit outlook from "stable" to "negative."

Today the Post buried on page A14 a story by staffer Zachary Goldfarb about a House of Representatives investigation into the matter:

April 28, 2011, 12:20 PM EDT

On Sunday, a Wikileaks document dump revealed files from Guantanamo Bay in which military commanders noted the Finsbury Park mosque in north London was a "haven" for Islamic extremists, "an attack planning and propaganda production base" that recruited jihadists to fight in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

But while the American mainstream media have been ga-ga over tomorrow's royal wedding, there's been little if any attention paid to this development by the very same reporters who were packing their bags for London.

A search of Nexis for ABC, CBS, and NBC news transcripts from April 25 through today reveals nothing on the Finsbury Park mosque, although other information from the latest wikileaks dump was discussed.

April 28, 2011, 10:15 AM EDT

Left-wing storylines generally are not box-office blockbusters, yet Hollywood liberals insist on making message movies anyway.

The same is true, and has been for decades, for comic books.

The latest example involves the quintessential American superhero, Superman (h/t e-mail tipster John Craig).

April 26, 2011, 5:53 PM EDT

A new poll finds one out of 10 Egyptians are sympathetic to Islamic "fundamentalists," 75 percent have a positive view of the Muslim Brotherhood, and 79 percent have a "very" or "somewhat unfavorable" view of the United States.

But Washington Post's Michael Birnbaum seems to portray this data as of little concern (emphasis mine):

April 26, 2011, 11:31 AM EDT

In his "Rewrite" segment last night, MSNBC's "Last Word" host Lawrence O'Donnell pounded out a 9-minute-long sermonette against conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh.

O'Donnell slammed Limbaugh as biblically illiterate, reacting to a monologue from his April 25 program in which Limbaugh complained about liberals co-opting Jesus Christ for political purposes in the federal budget debate, posing questions such as "What Would Jesus Cut" from the budget.

"What would Jesus take?" Limbaugh countered, answering "nothing." O'Donnell vehemently disagreed, going on to cite Scripture references -- divorcing them from context -- in order to argue Jesus was a fan of "progressive taxation," among other things.

April 25, 2011, 5:52 PM EDT

Disgraced former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich (D) may find a January 2009 appearance on Rachel Maddow's program coming back to bite him.

According to the Chicago Tribune's Bob Secter and Jeff Coen, federal prosecutors are hoping to use an excerpt of an interview in Blago's retrial:

April 25, 2011, 12:41 PM EDT

Until now, MSNBC's "Lean Forward" ad campaign had largely avoided wearing the network's leftward slant as a badge of pride. Sure, there were hints here and there that "Lean Forward" really means "left-leaning," but the older ads were subtle compared to the latest batch which beat you over the head with their liberal take on major political issues.

For example, you can expect to see MSNBC's Lawrence O'Donnell in this spot lamenting that ObamaCare didn't go far enough to the Left:

 

April 22, 2011, 3:06 PM EDT

Towards the Good Friday edition of the 12 p.m. hour of programming she anchors, MSNBC's Contessa Brewer highlighted a Louisville Disciples of Christ minister who refuses to sign off on marriage licenses until same-sex marriage is legal in the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

Brewer, the daughter of a Baptist minister, is an advocate for same-sex marriage.

As you can see from the video embedded after the page break -- given the biased title "Church takes a stand on marriage equality" by MSNBC -- Brewer failed to bring on a minister with an opposing perspective nor to sharply question Dr. Derek Penwell on his position:

April 21, 2011, 11:13 AM EDT

Are you a Christian who also is supportive of Rep. Paul Ryan's budget plan? Then you'd best repent of your sin and be renew your mind with the social gospel.

That's the pronouncement of liberal theologian Susan Brooks Thistlethwaite in an April 18 post at the Washington Post/Newsweek "On Faith" website.

Brooks Thistlethwaite -- who previously hit Tea Party conservatives as tribalistic -- apparently believes that politically conservative Christians are trying to serve two masters, Jesus and Ayn Rand (emphasis mine):

April 20, 2011, 4:36 PM EDT

Imagine it's April 2007 and President Bush's Treasury department lobbied unsuccessfully to deter credit analysts at Standard & Poor's from revising the credit outlook of the United States government from "stable" to "negative."

No doubt it would be front-page news as the election season was heating up and there's yet another piece of bad news to lay at the feet of Bush and the Republican Party.

Only that didn't happen to the former president, it has  happened to Barack Obama, just without the front-page treatment.

From the bottom half of page A5 of today's Washington Post:

April 20, 2011, 1:38 PM EDT

Damned if you do, damned if you don't.

That could accurately describe Republicans' relationship to the liberal media on budget matters.

While the mainstream media often raise a clamor about GOP plans to cut back on arts funding -- see this article from yesterday's Washington Post -- it seems any move to do the opposite will also face scorn.

Take ABCNews.com's "The Blotter" and its take on Rep. John Mica's (R-Fla.) proposal to expand funding the National Art Gallery:

April 20, 2011, 10:23 AM EDT

Does the hectoring of the leftist green movement know no bounds?

Apparently your stick of Juicy Fruit is a menace to the Earth now.

In his "The Green Lantern" column yesterday, the Washington Post's Brian Palmer took a look at how un-green chewing gum is.

April 19, 2011, 5:17 PM EDT

As part of its effort to "shore up" the backing of social conservatives, House Republicans today "issued a contract today to pay former Solicitor General Paul Clement $575 an hour, up to $500,000 to defend the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act," San Francisco Chronicle's Carolyn Lochhead insisted in the paper's Politics Blog.

"Republicans claim they will take the money out of the Justice Department's budget, as if that will hold taxpayers harmless. But a cost is a cost and taxpayers will pay it either way. Any funds removed from DOJ are funds removed from other work," Lochhead groused.

This from the same reporter who approved of Obama's fiscal year 2012 budget proposal as "centrist."

April 19, 2011, 12:12 PM EDT

Last week I noted how the Washington Post hyped Planned Parenthood as a provider of community health services in the District of Columbia although there were plenty of other full-service free or low-cost health clinics in the District run by other non-profit groups.

Today the Post is at it again, presenting Planned Parenthood as a crucial provider of health services in rural states like Montana.

But yet again, a quick Internet search shows Planned Parenthood isn't the only game in Big Sky Country when it comes to health clinics for the poor.

April 18, 2011, 4:35 PM EDT

Holy Week seems to be a favorite time of year for the liberal media to level challenges to the Christian faith, either in its theological claims or in some matter of ecclesial practice, or both.

So it's no surprise that Time's Tim Padgett used yesterday, Palm Sunday, to write his "Palm Sunday Plea: Let Priests Marry":

April 18, 2011, 1:50 PM EDT

With its latest discussion question, the Washington Post/Newsweek "On Faith" website explored the overly-broad and loaded question "What is religion's role in gender discrimination?"

So what's the news hook?

Why, none other than the most recent pontifications of America's favorite moralizing deacon, former President Jimmy Carter:

April 15, 2011, 5:16 PM EDT

Yesterday afternoon, the Bloomberg financial news service picked up on a study by PricewaterhouseCoopers showing that U.S. companies pay the sixth highest effective corporate tax rates in the world.

"The tax rate for the largest U.S. companies between 2006 and 2009 was 27.7 percent, compared with a non-U.S. average of 19.5 percent, according to the study," reporter Richard Rubin noted. "Excluding the U.S., companies based in industrialized countries had an average rate of 22.6 percent."

But when the Washington Post picked up the story, it condensed the 15-paragraph Bloomberg story to a two-sentence squib on the Economy & Business page on A17 (see screencap of print edition PDF below):