Callista Ring

MRC Culture Intern


Latest from Callista Ring

Syfy’s new show, Blood Drive, centers itself on a dystopian world destroyed by climate change. As a result, anyone who wants a decent life must partake in a gruesome race using cars powered by human blood. Syfy's description of the show is: “The Future: where water is a scarce as oil, and climate change keeps the temperature at a cool 115 in the shade. It’s a place where crime is so rampant that only the worst violence is punished.” Wednesday night’s episode, “Welcome to Pixie Swallow,” revealed that fracking is what led to the violent, depraved world that exists in the show


Wednesday night’s episode of NBC’s The Carmichael Show, “Cynthia’s Birthday,” presented a unique perspective on the use of the n-word. Jerrod Carmichael's family is appalled that his white friend, Drew, who owns the fancy restaurant they are going to for Cynthia's birthday, greets him as “my nigga.” There is discussion about leaving over the remark, but Jerrod defends his friend, saying that he’s “completely cool with it.” Jerrod’s father, Joe, (David Alan Grier) on the other hand claims that Jerrod was “racially slurred,” an occurrence “much worse than a terrorist attack.”


The liberal taxpayer-funded PBS focused June 19’s episode of its Independent Lens film series on a teen’s transgenderism. Bennett (or Ben), formerly known as Rachael, transitioned from a girl to a boy because, as he it summed up, “I am a boy with the wrong body parts.” At 19 years old, Ben started taking testosterone to begin his transformation into a boy. But he says his decision was a long time in the making. He even claimed that when he was younger, he “hated using the women's restrooms.


In the wake of this morning’s shootings in Alexandria, Virginia and San Francisco, NBC pulled the episode of The Carmichael Show set to air today, “Shoot-Up-Able,” which was supposed to revolve around a mass shooting. Instead, NBC aired “Lesbian Wedding,” a more light-hearted episode originally set to air on June 28.  Unlike last week’s episode which promoted a clear liberal political agenda, having Joe (David Alan Grier) and his sons help Joe’s mother commit suicide, this week the show remembered it’s a comedy and offered some funny dialogue about a family member’s lesbian wedding


The writers of Hulu’s Casual are determined to stick in liberal propaganda wherever they see fit, as shown by Tuesday’s episode, “Troubleshooting.” While Valerie Meyers (Michaela Watkins) gets drinks with an old friend, the girlfriend of a man Valerie slept with confronts her at the bar, chastising Valerie for breaking “girl code.” Valerie responds, “Girl code? Really? Did you see who we elected as president?” Apparently Donald Trump’s election means it’s okay to cheat. Too bad Hillary Clinton didn’t win, or else Valerie could be off the hook completely


NBC’s The Carmichael Show has become the latest show to join Hollywood’s trend of endorsing euthanasia. On Wednesday night’s episode, “Grandma Francis,” grandsons Jarrod (Jarrod Carmichael) and Bobby (LilRel Howery) help Grandma Francis, suffering from Alzheimer’s, kill herself with painkillers. Grandma Francis receives pushback from her son, Joe (David Alan Grier), after she declares she’s going to “take matters into my own hands and end my life myself.” She insists, “I got to make this decision while I still can."


Ever since Donald Trump entered the political sphere, liberals have loved comparing him to the sleazy, power-hungry Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey). Released in its entirety on Netflix on May 30, the fifth season of House of Cards contained some eerie parallels between the Underwood White House and liberal fantasies of the Trump White House. The Hollywood Reporter tells us, “If this season of House of Cards feels prescient, that's because the minds behind the critically acclaimed series did their research.” The show runners “looked into what could happen based on what has already been simmering in America.” 


The season 3 premiere episodes of NBC’s comedy The Carmichael Show, “Yes Means Yes,” and “Support our Troops,” aired Wednesday night and presented a refreshing change from the liberal agenda driven TV shows we’re used to. The show managed to discuss numerous issues, including rape, Iraq, the troops, and slavery, in a comical yet meaningful way. First things first, both episodes have to attack President Trump, apparently obligatory for entertainment TV nowadays. Although the show has been pretty even handed in the past, the premier episodes took multiple shots at the President.


Joining the ranks of anti-Trump liberal TV shows is Hulu’s Casual. The most recent episode of its third season, “The Sprout,” which aired May 30, preached its liberal agenda while taking a few shots at the President. The show revolves around the lives of bachelor Alex Cole (Tommy Dewey), single mother Valerie Meyers (Michaela Watkins), and Valerie’s daughter, Laura (Tara Lynne Barr). Although the show is supposed to be a comedy, the writers have decided to make this season a more political one. 


The season finale of Fox’s race-baiting drama, Shots Fired, “Hour 10: Last Dance,” continued with its black=good, white=bad theme as it ended with this conclusion: it’s always about race. Wednesday night’s resolution was completely predictable. The black police officer, who was justified in killing unarmed white teenager Jesse Carr, is indicted. But there is no indictment for the wealthy white man who killed unarmed black teenager Joey Campbell.


The 2-part season finale of Lifetime’s Mary Kills People, “The Judas Cradle” and “Morning Glory,” which aired Sunday night, wrapped up the season with this message: Those in favor of assisted suicide are “the good ones.” Those against assisted suicide are “bad guys.” Even in the midst of a murder investigation, her partner turning on her, and her daughter never wanting to speak to her again, Holy Mary (Caroline Dhavernas) still finds the time to kill people. She meets a man suffering from cystic fibrosis in a hotel room, and the two proceed to push the show’s justifications for assisted suicide, likening “refusing to let people die” to medieval torture. 


Wednesday night's episode of Fox's Shots Fired, "Hour 9: Come to Jesus," continued to build on its storyline in which wealthy white donors are furnished with guns and tasers – as part of the "Tours" program—and take part in ride-alongs with racist police in the fictional town of Gate Station, North Carolina. To recap, a wealthy white donor executed black teenager Joey Campbell while he was helpless, on the ground, and crying for his mother. What else would you expect from a wealthy white man armed with a gun? In tonight's episode, we learn that the wealthy white donor – who also happens to be building a private prison (classic!) – thought he was taking out his taser, intending only to stun the boy. Instead, he slaughters the poor youth.


Sunday night’s episode of Lifetime’s Mary Kills People, “Raised by Wolves,” continued to praise Mary for her lethal mission despite her and her partner’s doubts. The episode also revealed that Mary helped her mother commit suicide when she was only 16. In the wake of her ongoing investigation for murder, Mary (Caroline Dhavernas) visits her sister and tells her about her side job. When her sister, Nicole, looks reasonably shocked, Mary explains, “These people need me okay? No one else will help them. I’m a doctor and it’s medicine.” Of course, Nicole quickly comes around to seeing the apparent good in the service Mary provides.


Wednesday night’s episode of Fox’s Shots Fired, “Hour 8: Rock Bottom,” took aim at police officers, again, making them out to be corrupt, greedy white men out to get black people. After Pastor Janae is arrested for the murder of black teenager Joey Campbell, she is questioned by main characters Special Prosecutor Preston Terry (Stephen James) and Investigator Ashe Akino (Sanaa Lathan). While it’s becoming clear that the white, racist police officers at the station are clearly using her as a cover-up, Pastor Janae makes a pointed comment about policing in general. 


Sunday night’s episode of Lifetime’s Mary Kills People, “Wave the White Flag,” championed the cause for passive euthanasia (withdrawing medical treatment with the intention of causing the patient’s death) with both a Bible verse and statements by the police officer investigating Mary for murder. After a man is placed on life support, Mary (Caroline Dhavernas) advises his significant other, Sonia, on how to proceed regarding the next step. Although the doctors can still do more to save the man’s life, Sonia worries about his earlier wishes not to “breathe through a tube or something.” Mary offers a statement said to her earlier by an elderly woman whose life she was ending: “There's beauty in the inevitable.” Although his death isn’t inevitable, as there are other surgical options, Sonia equates Mary’s advice to a bible verse to justify letting him die.


Wednesday night’s episode of Fox’s newest racially obsessed drama Shots Fired, “Hour 7: Content of Their Character,” took a short break from race-baiting to highlight the unnecessary destruction that comes from riots like Ferguson and Baltimore. In the wake of violent demonstrations in Gate Station, DOJ Special Prosecutor Preston Terry (Stephen James) becomes disheartened at the sight of the devastation of his kind friend’s restaurant. He states the obvious regarding the destructive riots: “I don't know what's supposed to be gained by all this.”


Reminiscent of Scandal’s 2015 winter finale episode, which showed an abortion set to the song “Silent Night,” the second episode of Lifetime’s Mary Kills People, “The River Styx,” had Mary end someone’s life to Sarah McLachlan’s “Full of Grace.” On Sunday night’s episode, the 15-year-old son of a woman suffering from ALS holds life-ending “nurse” Mary Harris’s (Caroline Dhavernas) partner, Des (Richard Short) at gunpoint. The son, Charlie, demands that Des and Mary kill his sick mother. When Mary finally shows up to deliver the life-ending drug, Charlie plays his mom’s favorite song, “Full of Grace,” while Mary injects her. 


On Wednesday night’s episode of Shots Fired on FOX, “Hour 6: The Fire this Time,” the town of Gate Station, North Carolina became the site of violent, racially motivated riots, to the delight of Pastor Janae. As racial tensions in the town escalate, Pastor Janae follows through on her desire for another Ferguson. She urges a crowd to action by calling for a “fire to burn down police brutality,” “racism,” and “injustice.” Although she uses the word “riot,” she claims that this will be a riot of peace, not violence.


In the wake of pro-assisted-suicide films like Me Before You and the media’s applauding of Brittany Maynard’s choice to die, Lifetime’s new euthanasia drama, Mary Kills People, is the latest show to champion the cause of assisted suicide. The first episode, reasonably titled “Bloody Mary,” premiered Sunday night and began with Mary Harris (Caroline Dhavernas) and partner Des (Richard Short) giving a man his life-taking drug in a glass of champagne. When the man hesitates, Mary calms him down by comparing the fear of death to the fear of flying in an airplane. .


Wednesday night’s episode of Shots Fired, “Hour 5: Before the Storm,” officially established the show as over-the-top, race-baiting nonsense. While DOJ Special Prosecutor Preston Terry (Stephen James) and Investigator Ashe Akino (Sanaa Lathan) delve deeper into their investigation of the deaths of black, unarmed teen Joey Campbell and white, unarmed teen Jesse Carr, their discovery about the white, racist police department out to get black people takes an inexplicable turn. Akino pieces together that rich, white people are hunting poor, black people for sport. Literally.