Brad Wilmouth

Contributing Writer


Brad Wilmouth is a former Media Research Center news analyst and an alumnus of the University of Virginia.

Latest from Brad Wilmouth

Appearing as a guest on Friday's Hardball, MSNBC's Joy Reid claimed that Donald Trump's voters wanted him to "get all the brown people" off Obamacare instead of themselves. And then, following up on her AM Joy show the next morning, she hosted New York magazine columnist Frank Rich to discuss his latest article, "No Sympathy for the Hillbilly," in which he argued that Democrats are misguided in thinking that spending more time being sympathetic to Trump voters will lead them to future electoral success as they should work to boost their base turnout instead.


On Friday's Real Time show on HBO, far-left comedian Bill Maher made plenty of room for crass and hyperbolic attacks on President Donald Trump. The show featured everything from incest jokes about Ivanka Trump to offering a serious warning that President Trump might follow Adolf Hitler's lead in bringing "fascism" to America after a terrorist attack reminiscent of the burning of the Germany Reichstag building in the 1930s.


CNN political analyst David Gergen's recent hyperbolic claim that Donald Trump may have had the worst first 100 days of any President in history was so over the top that even his CNN colleagues are still laughing at him the day after.  On Saturday's CNN Newsroom, after right-leaning actor and former Gergen subordinate Ben Stein jabbed his former boss by recalling how bad Abraham Lincoln's first 100 days were, CNN political analyst Ron Brownstein joined in by noting that William Henry Harrison died in his first month, inspiring laughter from Stein and CNN host Ana Cabrera. Gergen notably made an appearance on CNN Newsroom a couple of hours later and doubled down, claiming Trump's first 100 days may have been worse than Lincoln's.


On Thursday's CNN Tonight, host Don Lemon picked up on Democrats hyping a photograph of President Donald Trump meeting with the House Freedom Caucus because all members of the conservative group are white men. Lemon recalled a friend of his who cracked that "the only thing brown in that picture is the table," while CNN analysts Nia-Malika Henderson and David Gergen also weighed in to fret over the lack of diversity. Debating three panel members who were arguing from the left, conservative CNN political commentator Jack Kingston only got a modest amount of help from CNN political analyst Mark Preston in making the point that the White House had met with other groups other than just the Freedom Caucus.


On Thursday's Tavis Smiley show, PBS host Smiley made one of the most over the top analogies one will hear in the health care debate as he likened the repeal of ObamaCare to a "drive-by" shooting that would "kill" people who are "innocent bystanders" as he hosted liberal activist Sister Simone Campbell as his guest. Smiley wondered how Speaker Paul Ryan views people who might suffer if ObamaCare were repealed: "They may not be the targets, but there are often innocent victims who are -- the bystanders.They get hit in a drive-by. Somebody came through there to kill somebody -- and you weren't the target, but you got killed as an innocent bystander. Does he not -- so if he doesn't see them as the targets, does he see them as potentially innocent persons who are going to get killed in this drive-by?"


As former New Hampshire Senator Kelly Ayotte appeared as a guest on Thursday's Andrea Mitchell Reports to discuss the Neil Gorsuch nomination for the U.S. Supreme Court, host Mitchell brought up "bitterness" from Democrats about the Senate's refusal to take up President Barack Obama's nomination of Merrick Garland last year. She ended up claiming that former Vice President Joe Biden was "taken out of context, with all due respect," after Republican Ayotte started to recall that, in 1992, then-Senator Biden advocated blocking action on any potential Supreme Court vacancies until after the election.


On Tuesday's Tavis Smiley show on PBS, as New York magazine's Andrew Sullivan appeared as a guest to discuss current political events, host Smiley at one point fretted that -- because Republicans denied President Barack Obama the chance to appoint Judge Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court -- they were "trampling" on the Constitution, and oddly asked if they might ignore other parts of the Constitution like the abolition of slavery or the right for women to vote. Suggesting that Republicans violated the Constitution in blocking Judge Garland, Smiley whined: "It was, to be sure, a violation of democratic norms, but it was more than that. To me, it was a trampling on the Constitution by the Republican party who did not give Mr. Garland a hearing. ... He was obligated to put forth that nomination, and they were obligated to take it up, I believe, and vote up or down. So it wasn't just a violation or an abrogation of norms, it was a trampling on one of our most precious documents."


On Saturday's AM Joy on MSNBC, during a discussion of the defeat of right-wing politician Geert Wilders's political party in the Netherlands, MSNBC analyst Christopher Dickey derided Donald Trump as a "right-wing extremist" and "lunatic" who is "nuts" as he theorized that Europeans are rejecting such politicians because of the U.S. President. And recurring MSNBC guest and Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin declared that GOP ideology under Trump is "abhorrent" as she declared that "I don't consider myself a Republican any longer."


On Friday's PBS NewsHour, the show's regular "Shields and Brooks" segment unintentionally summed up the major problem conservatives have with the show -- that there is no actual conservative panel member giving a contrasting point of view against liberal columnist Mark Shields as he and New York Times columnist David Brooks often show little disagreement when discussing the week's political news. As the two men were both critical of Republicans over both ObamaCare repeal and the White House budget, not only did Shields at one point declare that "I can't argue with any point that David (Brooks) made," but a bit later, host Judy Woodruff observed that "both of you are saying the same thing." Shields then joked: "What? I hope not. I mean, there's no point in watching."


On Thursday's CNN Tonight, Don Lemon hosted a discussion in which he suggested that black Americans would "lose" in President Donald Trump's budget in spite of Trump asking black voters during the campaign, "what do you have to lose?" As conservative CNN political commentator and Trump supporter Paris Dennard was outnumbered 4-1 -- facing off with two liberals guests, a liberal host and a right-leaning guest who was critical of Trump's budget -- Dennard jousted with Lemon and at one point was admonished by the host to "let other people speak" even though Dennard was not the one speaking at the time.


Appearing as a guest on Wednesday's CNN Tonight, comedian and CNN host W. Kamau Bell declared that he was "more offended" by Republican Rep. Joe Wilson shouting, "You lie!" at President Barack Obama than he was at the depiction of President Donald Trump being shot at, during a discussion of Snoop Dogg's controversial rap video. Host Don Lemon oddly proclaimed that he was not bothered by the video "except for the gun part where he shoots," even though that scene is the primary reason people are criticizing it.


Appearing as a guest on Monday's Charlie Rose on PBS, allegedly right-leaning New York Times columnist David Brooks was negative on House Speaker Paul Ryan's plan to replace ObamaCare as he hyperbolically claimed that it amounted to "declaring war on" those who voted for President Donald Trump as he predicted as many as 15 million people would be "denied insurance." 


Appearing as a guest on Sunday's CNN Newsroom to promote the latest episode of his series Believer, CNN host Reza Aslan tried to tie recent bomb threats against Jewish community centers to "rhetoric that's coming out of the White House." It was not mentioned that many of the threats are believed by law enforcement to have originated overseas, or that the one man who has been charged for a small portion of them was an anti-Trump liberal.


On Sunday's AM Joy, MSNBC host Joy Reid spent a couple of minutes fretting over the results of a recent Democratic mayoral primary in black-majority St. Louis in which a white Democrat endorsed by the local police union managed to win the primary because black voters were divided amongst several black candidates. 


Appearing as a guest on Saturday's AM Joy on MSNBC, Top Chef host Padma Lakshmi of the Bravo network bizarrely alluded to America having committed "crimes" and "felonies" against other countries as she lamented that people abroad have lost feelings of "goodwill" they used to feel toward the U.S,, while she and host Joy Reid fretted over the Donald Trump administration's crackdown on illegal immigration. Lakshmi: "Regardless of whatever crimes or felonies that Americans -- or the American government or policy -- may be, you know, guilty of doing abroad, America still has a lot of -- or had a lot of goodwill because, you know, there was always this example of being a hopeful, tolerant place."


On Thursday's Anderson Cooper 360, host Cooper got guest Jorge Ramos of Univision to admit that it is a "good thing" that illegal immigration has dropped 40 percent since President Donald Trump took office. But, after complaining that Trump's policies are "xenophobic," and that the President wants to "make American white again," Ramos ended up repeating the misinformation circulating on the left that illegal immigrants are less likely to commit crimes than the population in general in spite of studies showing the opposite.


On Wednesday's CNN Tonight, host Don Lemon was joined by fellow CNN host and comedian W. Kamau Bell to argue that Dr. Ben Carson deserved to be criticized for his recent comments that included African slaves with other "immigrants" as they argued that President Barack Obama's similar words highlighted by conservatives were somehow different and justifiable. Although Dr. Carson's use of the word "immigrants" in his speech to HUD was a large component of the lambasting he attracted from liberals, Bell shifted the focus away from the use of the word "immigrants" to Dr. Carson's comments about slaves dreaming of a better life -- as if it were unreasonable to think slaves would have hoped that their children would some day have a better life.


On Thursday's New Day, CNN personalities Chris Cuomo and Angela Rye demonstrated that there's just no convincing liberals that giving men a right to demand entry into women's restrooms, changing rooms or shower rooms is a bad idea, even if you cite examples of sexual predators taking advantage of liberal access policies to victimize women and girls. During a debate over efforts by the Texas legislature to require people to use public restrooms in schools and public buildings that correspond to their birth gender, both host Cuomo and CNN commentator Rye dismissed conservative CNN commentator Ben Ferguson specifying four examples of men filming women and girls in department stores, with Rye even chuckling about the four examples supposedly being an insignificant number.


On Tuesday's MSNBC Live, anchor Kate Snow hosted liberal political pundit Roland Martin of TV One to trash Dr. Ben Carson over his recent comments including African slaves among immigrants who traveled to America and faced hardships in the past. Martin -- who used to be a CNN political commentator -- called Dr. Carson's words "asinine," "idiotic," "stupid," and a "flat-out lie," and tried to link him to an alleged effort by conservatives to "soften" or "redefine" the history of slavery in America.


Appearing as a guest on Tuesday's All In with Chris Hayes, supposedly right-leaning Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin was at it again -- appearing on MSNBC to mostly agree with a liberal host -- as she joined Hayes in fretting over President Donald Trump's proposal for a government agency that tracks criminal activity by non-citizens. After oddly claiming that such an agency would likely be unconstitutional, suggesting that it would "create a mob mentality," Rubin -- who was even identified on screen as a "conservative columnist" -- took a swipe at Fox News, calling it a source of "nonsense" news consumed by President Trump.